Dr Katharine Burn

Katharine taught history in schools in Oxford for ten years before completing a doctorate focused on beginning teachers’ professional learning. After four years’ working as a Senior Lecturer in History Education at the Institute of Education, she has returned to Oxford as a Fellow of St Cross College.

Katharine leads the PGCE history programme and teaches within the MSc in Learning and Teaching. She supervises Master’s and doctoral students, particularly focusing on history teaching and on teachers’ professional learning. Katharine is also Chair of the Secondary Committee of the Historical Association and a co-editor of the professional journal Teaching History.

Katharine would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Initial teacher education – beginning teachers’ learning, clinical practice, the integration of knowledge from different sources, mentoring strategies;
  • Teachers’ continued professional learning – the development of subject specific pedagogy, learning within and beyond subject departments, teacher engagement in and with research;
  • History education – including the impact of policy on curriculum and pedagogy; inclusive pedagogies (the value of history for all); curriculum planning and the integration of substantive and second order concepts.

Books

  • Counsell, C, Burn, K, Chapman, A, Brindley, S (2016) MasterClass in History Education Transforming Teaching and Learning. Bloomsbury Publishing.

  • Mutton, TA, Burn, K, Hagger, H (2015) Beginning Teachers’ Learning: Making experience count.

  • Harris, R, Burn, K, Woolley, M (2013) The Guided Reader to Teaching and Learning History. Routledge.

Book chapters

  • Burn, KC (2015) “The Gove legacy in the curriculum: the case of history”, In: M Finn (ed.) The Gove Legacy Education in Britain After the Coalition. Palgrave Macmillan.

Journal articles

  • Mutton, T, Burn, K, Menter, I (2017) “Deconstructing the Carter Review: competing conceptions of quality in England’s ‘school-led’ system of initial teacher education”, Journal of Education Policy. 32(1) 14-33.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02680939.2016.1214751

  • Burn, K, Mutton, T, Thompson, I, Ingram, J, McNicholl, J, Firth, R (2016) “The impact of adopting a research orientation towards use of the Pupil Premium Grant in preparing beginning teachers in England to understand and work effectively with young people living in poverty”, Journal of Education for Teaching. 42(4) 434-450.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02607476.2016.1215551

  • Burn, K, Childs, A (2016) “Responding to poverty through education and teacher education initiatives: a critical evaluation of key trends in government policy in England 1997-2015”, Journal of Education for Teaching. 42(4) 387-403.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02607476.2016.1215547

  • Harris, R, Burn, K (2016) “English history teachers’ views on what substantive content young people should be taught”, Journal of Curriculum Studies. 48(4) 518-546.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00220272.2015.1122091

  • Burn, K, Mutton, T (2015) “A review of ‘research-informed clinical practice’ in Initial Teacher Education”, Oxford Review of Education. 41(2) 217-233.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2015.1020104

  • Childs, A, Burn, K, McNicholl, J (2013) “What influences the learning cultures of subject departments in secondary schools? A study of four subject departments in England”, Teacher Development. 17(1) 35-54.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13664530.2012.753945

  • McNicholl, J, Childs, A, Burn, K (2013) “School subject departments as sites for science teachers learning pedagogical content knowledge”, Teacher Development. 17(2) 155-175.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13664530.2012.753941

  • Mutton, T, Hagger, H, Burn, K (2011) “Learning to plan, planning to learn: the developing expertise of beginning teachers”, TEACHERS AND TEACHING. 17(4) 399-416.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13540602.2011.580516

  • Hagger, H, Mutton, T, Burn, K (2011) “Surprising but not shocking: The reality of the first year of teaching”, CAMBRIDGE JOURNAL OF EDUCATION. 41(4) 387-405.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2011.624999

  • Mutton, T, Burn, K, Hagger, H (2010) “Making sense of learning to teach: learners in context”, RESEARCH PAPERS IN EDUCATION. 25(1) 73-91.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02671520802382912

  • Malmberg, LE, Hagger, H, Burn, K, Mutton, T, Colls, H (2010) “Observed Classroom Quality During Teacher Education and Two Years of Professional Practice”, JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 102(4) 916-932.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0020920

  • Burn, K, Mutton, T, Hagger, H (2010) “Strengthening and sustaining professional learning in the second year of teaching”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 36(6) 639-659.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2010.501140

  • Hagger, H, Burn, K, Mutton, T, Brindley, S (2008) “Practice makes perfect? Learning to learn as a teacher”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 34(2) 159-178.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03054980701614978

  • Burn, K (2007) “Professional knowledge and identity in a contested discipline: challenges for student teachers and teacher educators”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 33(4) 445-467.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03054980701450886

  • Burn, K, Childs, A, McNicholl, J (2007) “The potential and challenges for student teachers' learning of subject-specific pedagogical knowledge within secondary school subject departments”, Curriculum Journal. 18(4) 429-445.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09585170701687886

  • Burn, K, Edwards, A (2007) “Learning in and across the professions”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 33(4) 397-401.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03054980701562664

  • Burn, K (2006) “Promoting critical conversations: The distinctive contribution of higher education as a partner in the professional preparation of new teachers”, Journal of Education for Teaching. 32(3) 243-258.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02607470600782252

  • Burn, K, Hagger, H, Mutton, T, Everton, T (2003) “The complex development of student-teachers' thinking”, Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. 9(4) 309-331.
    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1354060032000097235

Reports

Category

  • Department staff

College affiliation

  • St Cross College

Position

  • University Lecturer in Education (History)

Subject area

  • MSc Learning and Teaching
  • PGCE History

Research groups

  • OSAT
  • Teacher Education and Professional Learning

01865 274009

Publications, books and other work