Events archive

Random Inequity in School Mathematics Education: an insurmountable problem?

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18 June 2018 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Richard O’Donovan, Senior  Lecturer, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Convenor: Trevor Mutton

The issue of inequality within mathematics education has been an important area of research for many decades, however the focus has usually centred on identifiable sub-groups of the community based on factors such as gender, ethnicity, and location.  Analysis of data collected as part of a multi-year professional development program for mathematics teachers provides evidence for the possible existence of another, more general, form of mathematics education inequity, what might be called random inequity.  Given the potential prevalence of this type of disadvantage, it could prove to be an insurmountable problem for school based mathematics education.

 

English Medium Instruction Seminar (Title TBC)

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12 June 2018 13:00 - 14:01
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Nicola Galloway, Edinburgh University

Convenor: Dr Jessica Briggs

Childhood and Education in the United States and Russia: Sociological and Comparative Perspectives

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11 June 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Katerina Bodovski, Penn State University, USA

Convenor: Dr M, Department of Education

Utilizing sociological and comparative international perspectives, we will look at the ways childhood and education manifest themselves within the social reality of the contemporary US and Russia. In such investigation, the differences are as insightful as are similarities. The evidence on three main trends will be presented. First, over the last half a century, with the rapid expansion of higher education, we observe a greater emphasis on academic outcomes throughout childhood which, in turn, makes parenting further geared to academic success. Second, the sociological research shows profound inequality existing within and between countries that affects children’s everyday experiences, as well as their lifelong chances. Childhood is stratified, now more than ever, by the social background into which a child is born and also by the country in which they are raised. Finally, the emerging evidence shows the strengthening children’s agency, observed both in theoretical developments in sociology of education and childhood, and educational practice and parental strategies. The arguments are supported by quantitative analysis of the data drawn from several large datasets, both national and international.

Dr. Katerina Bodovski is an Associate Professor of Education in the Department of Education Policy Studies at the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Bodovski received her master’s in Sociology from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel, and her PhD in Sociology from the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Bodovski’s research interests lie in the intersection of sociology of education and comparative international education. She has published extensively in leading peer reviewed journals, and is a recipient of several prestigious research grants, including funding from the American Education Research Association, Foundation for Child Development and National Science Foundation.

Rethinking traditional survey-based research methods

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11 June 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Andrew Maul, University of California, Santa Barbara

Convenor: Dr Ariel Lindorff

Abstract: It is commonly believed that self-report, survey-based instruments can be used to measure a wide range of human properties of relevance to education and the social sciences, such as self-control, growth mindsets, and grit. However, the typical strategies employed for the validation of such surveys fall short of providing the kinds of rigorous tests of relevant hypotheses commonly expected in scientific research. This presentation will consist of three parts. In the first part, I will aim to illustrate the deficiency of common validation strategies by presenting a series of studies in which respondents were presented with survey items deliberately constructed to be uninterpretable, but the application of the mainstream validation procedures nonetheless returned favorable-appearing results. In the second part, I will attempt to diagnose some of the meta-theoretical issues that have contributed to the present state of affairs, in particular by examining the legacy of operationalist and behaviorist modes of thinking in the social sciences. In the third part, I will discuss some possible strategies for the improvement of surveys, and of survey-based research more generally.

A study into the use and accessibility of tacit knowledge within learning to teach

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07 June 2018 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Nicola Warren-Lee

Convenor: Katharine Burn

Abstract: This doctoral study focuses on ‘tacit knowledge’ understood as a personal form of knowledge, which plays a key role in the practice and professional development of beginning teachers. The role of and access to tacit knowledge in student teacher learning were investigated using a case study approach employing stimulated recall interviews wherein mentors were asked to reflect upon their teaching and explain their teaching actions.  Stimulated recall interviews involved student teachers taking on the role of interviewer. Thematic analysis of data revealed that student teachers probed key teaching episodes and encouraged mentors to reveal complex decision making which may otherwise have remained undisclosed. Both student teachers and experienced teachers valued tacit knowledge in the learning to teach process.  The interviews reveal that observable teaching actions had complex underlying reasoning and this was elicited via objective-led dialogue between student teacher and mentor, post-teaching.  Student teachers were able to independently select teaching events to examine further, and were able to understand their mentor’s actions and judgements more deeply as a result of stimulated recall interviewing. The implications arising out of this study include a need for change to observation and debriefing practices in school, with student teachers and mentors becoming more aware of the value and purpose of tacit knowledge.  The benefits of student teachers being instrumental in initiating and asking questions which can elicit experienced teachers’ tacit knowledge are clear; and findings show the potential for student teachers to become more pivotal in their own learning.  Where stimulated recall interviews were used mentors were encouraged to reveal embedded reasoning underpinning their classroom practice.

Creative applications of biographical research methods in social and educational sciences

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07 June 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker(s): Dr Lyudmila Nurse, Department of Education and Professor Maggie O’Neill, Department of Sociology, Wentworth College, University of York

Convenor: Alice Tawell

Talking Black In America

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05 June 2018 16:00 -

Documentary Screening and Panel Discussion Presented by University of Oxford’s Applied Linguistics Research Group Venue: Mary Ogilvy Theatre St Anne’s College, Oxford For more information and to book click here

Language development in children's writing from six to sixteen

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05 June 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Philip Durrant, University of Exeter

Convenor: Dr Jessica Briggs

The education system in England and Vietnam

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04 June 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speakers: Neil McIntosh CBE (Honorary Fellow, Department of Education) and Tony McAleavy (CfBT Education Trust)

Convenor: Professor Pam Sammons, Department of Education

The seminar will juxtapose current debates about education in England with aspects of the education system in Vietnam.

Neil will present his views about education as both a private good as well as a public good. Perhaps inevitably, most of the discourse about education focuses on maximising the public good. The danger is twofold, government gets increasingly intrusive in its attempts to drive up standards and parents increasingly perceive education as a service provided to or for their children rather than it being their joint responsibility with the schools and teachers. Neil will consider the connection between the nationalisation of accountability in England and the growing retention and recruitment crisis.

Tony will present a preview of findings from forthcoming research by Education Development Trust into the education system in Vietnam which strongly suggests that high levels of parental engagement contribute to the effectiveness of the Vietnamese school system. Parental involvement in Vietnam is multi-faceted and includes parent-teacher partnership on the progress of individual students, parental volunteering in school, parental involvement in accountability systems and fund-raising.

Neil McIntosh was for 22 years the Chief Executive of CfBT Education Trust now the Education Development Trust. During those two decades the Trust grew from a one product provider of English as a foreign language with a declining market to become Britain’s largest educational charity, combining the ability to compete with the commercial sector using surpluses generated by those operations to fund a major research programme. Neil was previously the Director of Shelter, the National Campaign for the Homeless and Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO).

Tony McAleavy is the Research and Consultancy Director of Education Development Trust (formerly CfBT Education Trust). He has worked for the charity since 2001. Tony has responsibility for the organisation’s public research programme. He also has oversight of a team of consultants who work worldwide on education reform programmes, particularly in developing countries.. Tony is the author of a forthcoming study of the government school system in Vietnam.

Changing ties: some techniques for investigating relational changes through social network analysis

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04 June 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Chris Downey, Associate Professor of Education, Southampton Education School

Convener: Dr Ariel Lindorff

This seminar will explore examples of the analysis of change within social networks. Examples will be drawn from research conducted in a range of education contexts. The linking theme will be measures of relational change, and will include discussion of some analytical methods that account for the interdependent nature of social network data.

In the DNA or missing gene? Devolution, local skills strategies and the challenge of inclusive growth in England

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31 May 2018 17:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Jonathan Payne, Reader in Employment Studies, De Montfort University

Abstract: A central challenge for devolution in England is whether it can contribute to ‘inclusive growth’ and address low-wage, low-skill and dead-end work. This paper approaches this through the lens of local skills strategies, which figure prominently in the devolution agenda. While skills cannot solve problems that are rooted in the wage earning structures of an economy, skills policies can contribute to ‘more and better jobs’ in combination with other policy interventions. At national level, skills policies have been dominated by a narrow skills-supply, target-led approach. There are important questions around how local actors understand a ‘skills problem’ that reflects weak employer demand for, and use of, skill in a neoliberal economy and polarised labour market, and whether they might evolve more holistic approaches that engage with ‘demand-side’ challenges. Drawing upon qualitative research with local actors in the Midlands, the paper explores their assumptive worlds in order to shed light on opportunities and constraints.

Social Media in Education Research: Facebook and WhatsApp as Research Tools.

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31 May 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Chloe Walker, Department of Education

Convenor(s): Ashmita Randhawa

Critical Debates around NESTs and LETs

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29 May 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Sue Garton, Aston University

Convenor: Dr Jessica Briggs

PGCE Open Evening

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24 May 2018 16:00 - 18:00
Department of Education 15 Norham Gardens Oxford OX2 6PY United Kingdom

The PGCE Open Evening is designed as an informal drop-in session for anyone looking to start a PGCE at the University of Oxford in September 2018. The admissions team and university tutors will be present to answer any questions. You can arrive at any point and are not expected to stay for the entire session. For more information, visit the our programme pages. To register your interest in the event, please email the PGCE Office at pgce.admissions@education.ox.ac.uk.

A multiple case-study of teachers’ learning experiences: observations, interviews and the challenges of discourse analysis

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24 May 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Laura Molway, Department of Education

Convenor(s): Jason Todd

OUCEA Annual Lecture 2018

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24 May 2018 -
Ashmolean Museum

The department's Centre for Educational Assessment is pleased to have Professor Derek C. Briggs as the guest speaker for this year's Annual Lecture, held at the Ashmolean Museum on 24 May. The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception in the Mallett Gallery. Derek Briggs is Professor and Chair of the Research and Evaluation Methodology programme at School of Education, University of Colorado at Boulder. He is also the Director of the Center for Assessment Design Research and Evaluation (CADRE).

Professor Brigg's talk will focus on “Tolerating Approximate Answers about Student Learning”, using recent and ongoing research on learning progressions in mathematics and science to illustrate how measurement provides a valuable frame of reference in our attempts to answer questions about student learning. While also emphasizing the danger of overselling measurement as an outcome when theories of learning are nascent and scoreable items are in short supply.

Tickets are free of charge and early booking advised to avoid disappointment. Click here to secure your place.

Transformative Activist Stance and Pedagogy of Daring

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22 May 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Anna Stetsenko (The City University of New York, the Graduate Center) Convenor: Professor Harry Daniels

In this talk, I will present the Transformative Activist Stance – a conceptual framework that features a transition from a relational worldview premised on the sociopolitical ethos of adaptation towards a transformative worldview premised on activism and transformative agency. Expansively developing Vygotsky’s revolutionary project steeped in the ethos of solidarity and equality, the Transformative Activist Stance integrates insights from a vast array of critical and sociocultural theories and pedagogies while interrogating their impasses to address the crisis of inequality in education and beyond. This approach captures the dynamics of social transformation and agency as a movement beyond the status quo that is part of the materiality of the world. The focus is on the nexus of people co-creating history and society while being interactively created by their own transformative agency. Revealing development and mind as agentive contributions to the ‘world-in-the-making’ guided by a sought-after future, this approach culminates in implications for research with transformative agendas and a pedagogy of daring. Along the way, the presently dominant theories of mind, development and education are challenged and radically reworked.

Anna Stetsenko is Professor in the PhD Programs in Psychology and in Urban Education at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She came to CUNY with years of experience in a number of leading research centers and universities in Europe (Switzerland, Germany, Austria and Russia). With her interdisciplinary expertise in psychology, philosophy, human development, and education combined with an international background, her writing cuts across many fields and connects cutting-edge developments and insights from a variety of frameworks. She is widely published in several languages and her recent book is The Transformative Mind: Expanding Vygotsky's Approach to Development and Education (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

Does contemporary character education rest on a mistake?

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22 May 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Dafydd Daniel, University of Oxford

Convenor(s): Professor Alis Oancea, Associate Professor Nigel Fancourt and Associate Professor Liam Gearon

From modular to linear GCSE exams: effects on standards and equity

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21 May 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speakers: Dr Michelle Meadows (Executive Director Strategy, Risk and Research, Deputy Chief Regulator, Ofqual) and Anne Pinot de  Moira (Consultant, Statistics & Assessment Research)

Convenor: Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Department of Education

Reforms to GCSE returned them to end of course, linear, assessments.  An evaluation project was conducted in collaboration with Ofqual to investigate the effect of the reforms on outcomes and on school practices.  This seminar focuses upon the quantitative findings relating to outcomes.  Part of the policy rationale for linearisation was concern about grade inflation.  There have also been fears that the linear examinations will be less equitable than the modular structure, particularly for low socioeconomic groups.  Using advanced statistical techniques, these issues have been explored.  Evaluation of these reforms is important, as they are costly public finance items.

Michelle is Deputy Chief Regulator of Ofqual.  She has responsibility for regulatory strategy and the maintence of standards over time.  Michelle is an active researcher and continues to publish work on educational assessment.  She is an Honorary Research Fellow of the Department of Education.

Anne is a chartered statistician with nearly 20 years’ experience working in the fields of assessment and education. She was Head of Assessment Research at the UK’s largest awarding organisation, AQA and is now an independent consultant.  Anne is an Honorary Norham Fellow at the Department of Education.

The relationship between A-level subject choice and league table score of university attended: the facilitating, the 'less suitable' and the counter-intuitive

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21 May 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Catherine Dilnot, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr Ariel Lindorff

Abstract: English students from less privileged backgrounds and state, rather than private, schools remain significantly under-represented at high-status universities.  There has been little work to date on the role of A-level subject choice, as opposed to attainment, in access to university. Using linked administrative data for three recent cohorts of English entrants to UK universities and correlated random effects models, I examine the relationship between league table score of university attended and A-level subject choices, using a taxonomy of A-levels categorized according to their published efficacy for Russell Group university admission as ‘facilitating’, ‘useful’ or ‘less suitable’.  I further examine the relationship of three ‘less suitable’ A-levels with league table score of university for related degree courses commonly leading to professional business careers (accountancy, business and law). Holding more facilitating A-levels is associated with attending a higher ranked university overall, even controlling for degree subject, and the converse is true for ‘less suitable’ subjects.   The heterogeneous relationships of professionally-related A-level subjects with university ranking make decision-making for aspirational 16-year-olds problematic: an apparently sensible subject choice for students wishing to prepare for a professional career may, in fact, put them at a disadvantage.

Book Launch - Learning to Teach In England and the United States: The Evolution of Policy and Practice

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17 May 2018 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room D

This seminar, held in conjunction with the Oxford Education Deanery, will celebrate the launch of the book 'Learning to Teach In England and the United States: The Evolution of Policy and Practice' (published by Routledge 2018).

Speakers: Teresa Tatto (Arizona State University), Katharine Burn, Ian Menter, Trevor Mutton & Ian Thompson

Abstract: Teacher education both in the United States and in England has become far more diversified in the past 20 years than ever before.  Programmes now include a broad range of institutions and theories of teacher learning. The origins of teacher education reform in England look very similar to that occurring currently in the United States and in other countries and, while teacher educators in England and in the U.S. share similar concerns, there has been little research-based exchange between them regarding their respective rationales and approaches to teacher education.  Adopting an explicitly sociocultural framework, the study on which this seminar is based, examines how policy has influenced the education of teachers and how it mediates the experience of prospective teachers as they negotiate the contexts of teacher preparation and the particular experiences of their school environments. The study examines the larger policy contexts in both countries and then focuses on one particular well-established institution in each context and one much newer provider of an alternative programme, along with their school-based partners. Using documentary data as well as questionnaires and videotaped observations of prospective teachers and their mentors in schools in the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 academic years, the analysis took a phenomenological approach to describe the meaning of individuals’ experiences as they engaged in extensive teaching as part of their field experiences. A key emerging issue is that of the alignment – or not – between the values and dispositions of the individuals and the institutions that are involved in teacher preparation. The study questions whether reforms that have introduced accountability regimes and new kinds of partnership have indeed contributed to more powerful learning experiences in schools for those entering the profession.

The seminar will include three short presentations that set out the theoretical framework and methodology of the study, present a number of the case studies and reflect on the implications of the comparison and on potential future trajectories.

Raising questions about coding qualitative data

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17 May 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Dr Velda Elliott, Department of Education

Convenor(s): Alice Tawell

Coding is a ubiquitous part of the qualitative research process, but it is often under-considered in research methods training and literature. I explore a number of questions about the coding process which are often raised by beginning researchers, in the light of the recommendations of methods textbooks and the factors which contribute to an answer to these questions. I argue for a conceptualisation of coding as a decision making process, in which decisions about aspects of coding such as density, frequency, size of data pieces to be coded, are all made by individual researchers in line with their methodological background, their research design and research questions, and the practicalities of their study. This has implications for the way that coding is carried out by researchers at all stages of their careers, as it requires that coding decisions should be made in the context of an individual study, not once and for all.

Digital Media, Culture and Education: Researching ‘Dynamic literacies’, ‘Third spaces’ and ‘Curation’

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16 May 2018 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr John Potter, UCL Knowledge Lab

Convenor: Dr James Robson

Everyday literacy practices with images and text onscreen are part of the lived experience of children from the earliest years, underscored by sounds, touch and movement at home, in school and through all the spaces in between in which they move. This talk will explore the use of three key terms employed in recent work in the field (Potter & McDougall, 2017).  Firstly, Dynamic Literacies as a way of framing all ‘literacy’; secondly, Third Spaces as a way of conceiving its locations and possibilities for shared meanings; and, finally, Curation as a way to think about identity, community and the digital, throughout the lifecourse, beginning in the earliest years.  The talk reflects on how these concepts could be mobilised in research to help us address the following key questions for researchers of digital learning lives:

Where do we focus our attention as researchers of literacy, pedagogy and identity and which kinds of methods are appropriate for the work?

What kinds of analytical language do we employ and which theoretical lenses do we place over the phenomena?

What do we look for in attempting to account for the various phenomena in “third spaces” and of what value is it to teachers, parents, carers and learners?

Reference

Potter, J & McDougall, J, (2017) Digital Media, Culture and Education: Theorising this space literacies. London: Springer/Palgrave Macmillan

Biography: Dr John Potter is Reader in Media in Education at the University College London Institute of Education, based in the UCL Knowledge Lab.  His research and publications are in the fields of: media education, new literacies, creative activity and learner agency; the changing nature of teaching and learning in response to the pervasive use in wider culture of media technologies in formal and informal settings. He is the author of a number of books and papers in the field, including the recently published “Digital Media, Culture and Education: Theorising third-space literacies” with Prof Julian McDougall (published by Palgrave/Springer in 2017). He is co-editor with Dr Rebecca Eynon of Learning, Media and Technology. Before working in the Knowledge Lab John taught in Primary Initial Teacher Education at both Goldsmiths and the University of East London. He was previously a local authority advisor and primary school teacher in East London.

More information here:

http://goo.gl/GTS0vB

Research Projects here:

http://darecollaborative.net

An experimental trial of the 'pedagogic spelling checker'

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15 May 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Miguel (Mika) Blázquez Carretero, University of the Philippines Diliman

Convenor: Dr Jessica Briggs

Exploring needs, costs and outcomes of services provided to vulnerable children and their families

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14 May 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Lisa Holmes, Director of Rees Centre Department of Education

Convenor: Dr Nigel Fancourt, Department of Education

This seminar will explore the relationship between the needs, services received and outcomes for children and families supported by children’s social care (CSC) services. Drawing on evidence from a programme of research, the presentation will explore the development of a standardised, nationally applicable conceptual framework to follow a child’s journey through different parts of the CSC system, as well as an examination of how practitioners use their time, and whether this should, and can be reconfigured. The seminar will also consider the application of the conceptual framework and use of ‘time use data’ to estimate unit costs for CSC and relate these to needs and outcomes.

Lisa Holmes is the Director of the Rees Centre. She has an international reputation for her research on child welfare and was until recently the Director of the Centre for Child and Family Research at the University of Loughborough. Over the past eighteen years, Lisa Holmes has undertaken a range of research and evaluations to inform child welfare policy and practice. She has been leading work nationally and internationally on the cost calculator for assessing costs of children’s social care services and relating these to needs and outcomes. She is also co-chair of the International Work Group for Therapeutic Residential Care.

Investigating immediacy in multiple phase-change single case experimental designs using a Bayesian unknown change-points model

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14 May 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Prathiba Natesan, University of North Texas

Convener: Dr Ariel Lindorff

Abstract: Single case experimental designs (SCEDs) are widely used to test the effects of interventions/treatments in education, psychology , and medicine (as n-of-1 designs). Although immediacy is one of the necessary criteria to show strong evidence of a causal relation in SCEDs, no inferential statistical tool is currently used to demonstrate it for multiple phase change designs. In this talk I will demonstrate a Variational Bayesian multiple unknown change-points model to investigate and quantify immediacy in multiple phase SCED analysis. Results of statistical simulation studies and application to real data will also be discussed.

A review of current evidence on promising educational approaches which are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education

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11 May 2018 11:30 - 13:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Judith Hillier

Convener: Professor Gabriel Stylianides

Abstract: This talk will present key findings from a systematic and rigorous review of the research literature recently conducted to gather and evaluate the evidence for promising educational approaches which are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. The evidence reviewed suggests that interventions designed to support the development of students’  scientific reasoning, their literacy skills and their metacognitive skills can have beneficial effects, provided certain conditions are met, and that technology may make a positive contribution. There is also evidence to show the benefits of interventions designed from a socio-cultural perspective, and these can be categorised as follows: 1. Bringing students into a science ‘place’ e.g. university laboratories or a science museum 2. Bringing scientists or extra-curricular science activities into schools 3. Developing teachers’ understanding of students’ perspectives The implications of these findings for teachers, teacher educators  and policy makers will be discussed.

Ethnography in the craft workshop: Journaling the perception of materials

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10 May 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Tom Martin, Department of Education

Convenor(s): Velda Elliott

The craft workshop poses a challenge to education researchers in that learning often results from interaction between an individual and physical materials, rather than through social interactions between individuals. Ethnography of craft therefore calls for specific techniques for journalling one's experience of materials over time, recording the ways in which they present themselves to perception and reveal their hidden physical properties. In this workshop I recount my fieldwork in American wooden boat workshops, where I used a phenomenologically-inspired mix of ethnographic and introspective methods to record how I learned the trade from the materials themselves as well as from the experts I worked alongside.

Mobile game design to promote arithmetic fluency

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03 May 2018 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Tim Jay, Professor of Psychology of Education in the Sheffield Institute of Education, Sheffield Hallam University. Tim researches young children’s mathematics learning in formal and informal settings.

Convenor: Professor Gabriel Stylianides

Abstract: I will share progress on the RAIDING project (Researching Adaptivity for Individual Differences in Number Games). We have developed and are now evaluating a touch-screen game to help children (7 and 8 years-old) develop arithmetic fluency, drawing on principles from mathematical cognition, neuroscience of game-based learning, and computer game development research.   In the seminar I will talk about the iterative user-centred design process for the game, and the ways in which we have incorporated design elements to engage learners and to focus attention on the content to be learned. Early results suggest a significant effect of game-play on arithmetic fluency, and we are currently considering next steps for this research. I’m looking forward to discussing these next steps with the audience.

Where are we going and how do we get there? A study of Oxford University Press Pathways to School Improvement

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03 May 2018 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Susila Davies, University of Oxford (DPhil student)

Abstract:This study explores the workings of, and practitioner engagement with, a selection of online resources provided by the Oxford University Press (OUP) for school improvement. On 5 November 2013, the OUP launched ‘Pathways’, an online ‘four-step system’ to school improvement comprising the following phases: ‘audit’, ‘strategic planning’, ‘take action’ and ‘evaluate impact’. The resources aim to support primary schools through a range of whole school improvement and teaching and learning tasks. This research studies primary school practitioner perceptions and attitudes towards OUP Pathways and both collective and individual improvement practice via an embedded multi-method case study comprising a purposive sample of five primary schools that signed up to use Pathways. It also follows the evolution of the Pathways themselves using a “design-based research” (DBR) framework - which attempts to bridge the realms of academia and external, more practical contexts. The study also examines how practitioners, particularly school leaders, use different forms of evidence to inform their practice and support collaborative working with their colleagues, using a mixture of resources that may have included Pathways. In an era of growing interest in the use of online technology to support various aspects of educational practice including e-resources for pupils and parents, this research focuses on how teachers engage with technology in their school improvement practice and their perceptions of such technology in their professional development experiences. Hence this study aims to investigate the nexus between two important streams that are normally studied separately or in parallel: school improvement and its links with how knowledge is managed and applied within different teams, and practitioners’ use of digital technologies, particularly in relation to professional development tools designed for primary school practitioners.

Using classroom video data in collaborative research: supporting teachers to notice features of practice

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03 May 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Dr Jenni Ingram, Department of Education

Convenor(s): Nicole Dingwall and Velda Elliott

 

The Future of Publicly Funded Faith Schools : A Critical Perspective

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01 May 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Richard Pring, University of Oxford

Convenor(s): Professor Alis Oancea, Associate Professor Nigel Fancourt and Associate Professor Liam Gearon

Exploring cognitive writing processes and behaviours through mixed methods

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01 May 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Andrea Révész, UCL Institute of Education Convenor: Dr Jessica Briggs

Higher education and the Sustainable Development Goals: the case of the intercultural universities in Mexico

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30 April 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Tristan McCowan, Institute of Education, University College London

Convener: Dr Maia Chankseliani, Department of Education

In the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals, higher education has been given a key role in addressing societal challenges, reducing poverty, ensuring sustainable livelihoods and protecting the natural environment. Yet there has been a singular lack of imagination as regards the institutional forms that might help support this vision. This presentation reports on the findings of an exploratory study of the Intercultural University of Veracruz, one of a number of institutions created in Mexico to ensure access for indigenous populations, to promote local development and to provide a space for intercultural dialogue. The findings show a number of ways in which this innovative institution provides opportunities for supporting the SDGs that go beyond conventional universities. However, it also presents challenges to the global framework, highlighting the lack of attention to culture, language, identity and knowledge traditions. Finally, the presentation reflects more broadly on the relationship between higher education and international development in the contemporary era.

Dr Tristan McCowan is Reader in Education and International Development at the Institute of Education, University College London. His work focuses on the areas of access to and quality of higher education, alternative and innovative universities, citizenship education and human rights, and covers a broad range of contexts, particularly in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa. He is currently conducting multi-country research projects on higher education pedagogy, graduate destinations and the public good in Africa, and is also involved in research on indigenous education in the Brazilian Amazon and Mexico. He is the author of Rethinking Citizenship Education (Continuum, 2009) and Education as a Human Right (Bloomsbury, 2013), and is editor of Compare – a Journal of International and Comparative Education.

Analysing student progression in modern languages from GCSE to A-level: Bayesian multilevel models in R

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30 April 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Cesare Aloisi, Centre for Education Research and Practice, AQA

Convener: Dr Ariel Lindorff

Abstract: Maintaining standards in GCSE and A-level qualifications is a core function of the education system in England, as well as a lively and challenging research area. This presentation will show how methodological and technological advances might help with standard setting in the future. In particular, it looks at the strengths and weaknesses of multilevel logistic regression in a Bayesian framework using R and Stan. Firstly, some context will be provided about language qualifications and GCSE–to–A-level progression. This will include languages on offer, number of entries and how standards are currently set and maintained across the country. After a brief introduction on Bayesian multilevel modelling in R, the presentation will focus on the ‘predictive’ accuracy of multilevel models, in the sense that they achieve a higher correct classification rate than standard regression. A discussion will follow on the possibilities and limitations of this approach, such as its scalability and necessary trade-offs. The presentation will conclude with some practical advice for carrying out similar analyses.

Tensions and resolutions around the physical learning environment

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26 April 2018 17:00 -
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Peter Barrett (Emeritus Professor University of Salford and Honorary Research Fellow University of Oxford)

Convenor: Professor Harry Daniels

Abstract: Building from the findings of the EPSRC-funded HEAD (Holistic Evidence and Design) findings about the impact of the physical classroom design on the learning progress of primary school pupils, this talk will explore a range of practical implications.  Examples will be drawn from experiences of applying the findings in diverse settings, such as Norway, Spain and Romania, as well as in the UK. Broader tensions or issues linking to the physical environment focus, such as questions of health, implications for pedagogy and the dynamics of change will be considered.  A model incorporating all of these aspects will be proposed.

Biography: Professor Barrett is a past President of the UN-established International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction (CIB). He is Emeritus Professor of Management in Property and Construction at Salford University in the UK and Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education at Oxford University.

Peter is an international advisor to the OECD and the US-based Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture and American Institute of Architects. He has produced over one hundred and seventy single volume publications, refereed papers and reports, and has made over one hundred and ten presentations in around sixteen countries.

Professor Barrett has undertaken a wide range of research. He is currently focusing on the theme of Senses, Brain and Spaces with a particular interest in the area of school design and achieving optimal learning spaces. The findings of this work have, for the first time, isolated the significant influence of physical classroo design on variations in pupils’ learning. This has directly influenced, for example, the US Green Building Council and the Norwegian Education Directorate.

Peter now provides strategic advice on optimising the impact of school buildings on learning, most recently for the World Bank in Romania and, in the UK, for the Girls’ Day School Trust and the Haberdashers' Aske's Boys' School.

For more details of Professor Barrett’s work, including a fuller cv, see: https://www.cleverclassroomsdesign.co.uk

The meaning of Autonomy: Analysis of interviews and newspaper archives

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26 April 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Susan Divald, Department of Politics and International Relations

Convenor(s): Susie Davis

The dissertation as a whole compares the autonomy claims of Hungarian minorities living in Slovakia and Romania since 1990. The presentation itself discusses data gathered during elite interviews and archival research, and walks through the analysis and findings done using Qualitative Content Analysis in NVivo.

Teachers as Writers: research and implications for the classroom

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24 April 2018 16:30 -
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Professor Teresa Cremin (Open University) and Becky Swain (Arvon)

Based on their research with teachers Professor Cremin and Ms Swain will present the key research findings from the Teachers as Writers project.  They will discuss the implications of this research for young people in classrooms when teachers are writers. http://www.teachersaswriters.org/

The Untapped Potential of ‘Work’ for Looked After Young People – Challenges and Opportunities

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23 April 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Robbie Gilligan, School of Social Work and Social Policy, Trinity College Dublin

Convenor: Dr Lisa Holmes, Department of Education

The seminar will explore the transformative potential of ‘work’ (ranging from paid employment to internships to volunteering) for marginalised young people. Using evidence from the Care to Work Pathways Study and wider literature, the presentation will identify different ways in which early and later positive work experience can benefit the social and/or educational progress of young people in care. It will re-imagine some of our ideas about the sequencing, segregation and linking of ‘education’ and ‘work’. It will also consider how foster carers and other adults can help young people in care engage successfully with the world of work.

Professor Robbie Gilligan is co-principal investigator of the five country Care to Work Pathways study being conducted in Belgium, Czech Republic, Ireland, Spain and Sweden. It is investigating how young adult care leavers have made the transition successfully from care to the world of work, and how their experiences in the world of work have impacted on their lives. He is a member of the Board of the European Scientific Association for Residential and Family Care for Children and Adolescents, and of the International Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood for Young People Leaving Public Care (INTRAC).

Classifying out-of-home care histories using latent class and sequence analysis methods

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23 April 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Louise McGrath Lone, Department of Education, University of Oxford

Convener: Dr Ariel Lindorff

Background: Since 1992, data related to children in out-of-home care in England have been routinely collected through the Children Looked After return (CLA) in order to monitor care provision and outcomes for looked after children. However, official analyses of CLA data produce annual statistical ‘snapshots’, which cannot account for the complexity of care histories throughout childhood.

Methods: Using longitudinal CLA data for a large, representative sample of children born 1992-94 (N=19,848), I described their longitudinal care histories from birth to age 18. I then identified sub-groups of care histories using latent class and sequence analysis classification methods.

Results: Although childhood care histories were varied, seven latent classes were identified based on patterns of association between legal status, duration and stability of care. Most children (40.7%) had care histories that could be best classified as a ‘single, short, voluntary stay’ with a median stay in care of 5 months. Using sequence analysis methods, six clusters of care history were identified based on the timing, duration and stability of placements. Again, most children (58.4%) had care histories that could be best classified as a ‘short-term care’ with a median stay of 6 months.

Conclusions: Longitudinal analyses of administrative social care data can refine our understanding of how out-of-home care is used as a social care intervention among children in England. However, the utility of the CLA dataset for exploring care histories is limited by the range and nature of data it collects. Nonetheless, future work evaluating associations between outcomes and sub-groups of care history could help to inform policy related to care-experienced young people.

Students’ Perceptions of Democracy, Politics, and Citizenship Preparation in Upper Secondary Social studies

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22 March 2018 15:30 - 17:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Nora Elise Hesby Mathe Department of Teacher Education and School Research, University of Oslo, Norway

Convener: Dr Ian Thompson

Abstract: In this project, I have investigated how 16 – 17-year-old students enrolled in the obligatory subject social studies in Norwegian Upper Secondary school perceive and relate to the concepts of ‘democracy’ and ‘politics’, and how they view the role of social studies in terms of preparing them for citizenship. This is a mixed methods study, utilising individual and group interviews, as well as a quantitative survey. In this presentation, I will focus on the second sub-study, namely students’ perceptions of the concept of politics and their conceptions of the relationship between people and politics. This study has implications for citizenship education, particularly in view of research from the UK and other Western democracies raising concern about young people’s levels of political interest and participation.

Title to be announced

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20 March 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr Roger Barnard

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs

Deeply involved: social phenomena as a challenge for phenomenography

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08 March 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Kai Wortmann, PhD student, University of Tübingen

Conveners: Nicole Dingwall and Alice Tawell

Phenomenography is a qualitative research approach to investigate not a phenomenon itself but rather perceptions of a phenomenon. Its founder, Swedish educationalist Ference Marton (1986:31), describes it as “a research method for mapping the qualitatively different ways in which people experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand various aspects of, and phenomena in, the world around them”. In my talk, I will first introduce the basic ideas of phenomenography, then illustrate this with a study on student teachers’ experience as interns in schools abroad, and finally raise the question of ‘methodological object permanence’: What challenges occur given that the study’s participants were simultaneously part of the study’s phenomenon?

Reference:

Marton, F. (1986). Phenomenography – A Research Approach to Investigating Different Understandings of Reality, Journal of Thought, 21, pp.28-49.

CANCELLED | OSAT Reading Group

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07 March 2018 17:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, Oxford Sociocultural and Activity Theory (OSAT)

   

Pretend play and the development of children’s self-regulation and language skills

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07 March 2018 17:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker:Tanya Paes, University of Cambridge, UK

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou

The manner by which pretend play contributes to children’s cognitive development has garnered increasing interest recently. The present study examines the efficacy of a pretend play intervention on the self-regulation and language skills of 4- to 5-year-olds. Pretend play commonly includes a pretender consciously projecting a mental representation onto reality, and can be either a social or solo activity that can overlap with other types of play. The study aimed for a total sample size of 60 children from a school in the east of England. The children were randomized into two groups: (a) Experimental group- pretend play intervention; and (b) Treated control group- art activities. The small-scale intervention included sixteen 30-minute sessions over 13 weeks, in groups of six to seven children. Each session included: (1) shared storybook reading; (2) role-playing; and (3) review. During shared story-book reading the children were read a book and explicit phonological awareness (PA) and vocabulary instruction were presented for six words. Role-playing included providing the children with props to partake in pretend play. In terms of the review component, open-ended questions were used to go over the PA and vocabulary of the target words, and the pretend play activities that the children engaged in during the role-playing component. The children in the treated control group were given art supplies and engaged in crafts instead of the role-playing activities. Several measures were used pre- and post-intervention in two 20-min sessions to evaluate children’s self- regulation and language skills. The inclusion of self-regulation and language skills as presented in the format of a pretend play was hypothesized to relieve the pressure of the learning environment, and allow for development in these areas. The improvements that occurred in the children’s self-regulation and language skills in both groups are considered alongside other cognitive and educational factors so as to better comprehend the role of pretend play in educational settings.

Challenges of monolingual and multilingual education: cognition, numeracy and literacy skills in primary school children in India

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06 March 2018 17:00 -
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Ianthi Tsimpli, Cambridge

Convener: David Johnson, Bronwen Magrath and Monazza Aslam

This event is part of the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in the Education Systems of Developing Countries Research Programme Seminar Series

Despite the advances made in securing access to education for many more children around the world than was the case a decade ago, large numbers still do not have access to formal education; and where they do, many are not learning at all, or learning fast enough to make successful transitions through the education system.

And while there is a concerted effort to redress the learning gap, and indeed the learning divide, our understandings of those policies and interventions that are most likely to lead to improvements in learning for all, especially for the more disadvantaged learners remains partial.

So, how might we improve our understanding of what works to raise learning outcomes for all?

The ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme consists of a portfolio of 29 interdisciplinary research teams, each that undertakes cutting edge research on the manner in which the complex relationships between elements of the education system, the contexts in which they are embedded, and the dynamics operating within the system impact on efforts to raise learning outcomes for all.

This seminar series, organised by the ESRC-DFID Programme Research Lead brings together researchers from across the portfolio of research grants to present their questions, their thinking, and their learning.

For more details, please contact Bronwen Magrath or Gordano Kelava on prl@education.ox.ac.uk

POSTPONED | Tensions and resolutions around the physical learning environment (Public Seminar)

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05 March 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Peter Barrett, University of Salford

Convener: Professor Harry Daniels, The Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

Building from the findings of the EPSRC-funded HEAD (Holistic Evidence and Design) findings about the impact of the physical classroom design on the learning progress of primary school pupils, this talk will explore a range of practical implications.  Examples will be drawn from experiences of applying the findings in diverse settings, such as Norway, Spain and Romania, as well as in the UK. Broader tensions or issues linking to the physical environment focus, such as questions of health, implications for pedagogy and the dynamics of change will be considered.  A model incorporating all of these aspects will be proposed.

 

An introduction to Bayesian structural equation modelling

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05 March 2018 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Lars Malmberg, University of Oxford

Bayesian statistical modelling is on a sharp rise in the social science. Its philosophical basis rests on estimating the probability of parameter estimates given data, rather than the probability of data given a model (referred to as null-hypothesis statistical testing, NHST). It is a very feasible technique for situations in which (1) large-sample assumptions for Maximum Likelihood do not hold, or (2) models are complex resulting in misbehaved parameters (e.g., Heywood cases, negative residuals, correlations > 1). Bayesian techniques have been implemented in a range of freeware (e.g., R) and commercial software (e.g., SPSS, Mplus).  I will provide a gentle introduction to the modelling logic and a worked example for Bayesian structural equation models (BSEM).

CANCELLED | A multiple case-study of teachers’ learning experiences: observations, interviews and the challenges of discourse analysis

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01 March 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

This seminar will be rescheduled for the Summer Term.

Speaker:Laura Molway, DPhil and staff member, Education

Convener: Jason Todd

Laura will focus on the methods employed for a case-study of teacher learning in 6 school languages departments. She will describe and justify the methodological choices made when conducting observations in both structured and unstructured settings (departmental meetings and lunchtimes in the team room) and interviewing Heads of Department. Then she will focus on a discourse analysis approach to coding interview transcripts. In particular she will highlight how collaborative, competitive and coercive relationships between colleagues within subject departments shape the conditions for Professional Learning.

Title TBA

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28 February 2018 17:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker:Rossana Barros-Baertl Department of Education, University of Oxford

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou

 

School achievements and future life chances: using longitudinal register data of the Swedish population to explore the impact of school subjects

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28 February 2018 11:30 - 12:30
Seminar Room K/L, Bruner Building

Speaker: Dr Eva Lindgren, Umeå University

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs

Teaching for critical thinking: pedagogical innovation at universities in Kenya, Ghana and Botswana

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27 February 2018 17:00 -
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Rebecca Schendel, UCL

Convener: David Johnson, Bronwen Magrath and Monazza Aslam

This event is part of the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in the Education Systems of Developing Countries Research Programme Seminar Series

Despite the advances made in securing access to education for many more children around the world than was the case a decade ago, large numbers still do not have access to formal education; and where they do, many are not learning at all, or learning fast enough to make successful transitions through the education system.

And while there is a concerted effort to redress the learning gap, and indeed the learning divide, our understandings of those policies and interventions that are most likely to lead to improvements in learning for all, especially for the more disadvantaged learners remains partial.

So, how might we improve our understanding of what works to raise learning outcomes for all?

The ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme consists of a portfolio of 29 interdisciplinary research teams, each that undertakes cutting edge research on the manner in which the complex relationships between elements of the education system, the contexts in which they are embedded, and the dynamics operating within the system impact on efforts to raise learning outcomes for all.

This seminar series, organised by the ESRC-DFID Programme Research Lead brings together researchers from across the portfolio of research grants to present their questions, their thinking, and their learning.

For more details, please contact Bronwen Magrath or Gordano Kelava on prl@education.ox.ac.uk

Translanguaging as pedagogy: Insights from inside the classroom

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27 February 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr Tracey Costley, University of Essex

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs

A study of children starting school and the progress they make in their first year around the world: The iPIPS project (Public Seminar)

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26 February 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Peter Tymms, Durham University

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

The iPIPS project is an international study of children starting school around the world and the progress that they make in their first year at school. It is based on the Performance Indicators in Primary Schools (PIPS) baseline which has been used with about 3 million children and translated into more than a dozen languages. The talk will set out the large range of key cognitive and non-cognitive skills exhibited by children on entry to school and the great progress that they usually make during grade 1. It will reflect on the different educational systems found across the world, the differing approaches to education and discuss the challenge of making comparisons across cultures. Finally, some of the progress which has been made in overcoming technical, cultural and psychometric challenges will be outlined.

 

Children’s physical activity and mental health

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26 February 2018 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Jane Ahn, University of London

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg

The relationship between physical activity and mental health: findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study

Background

The benefits of physical activity (PA) on mental health in adults is well established, but less is known about this relationship in children. The aim is to examine the association between objectively measured sedentary time and PA, and mental health in children from the UK Millennium Cohort Study (MCS).

Methods

Accelerometer data were collected at MCS4 (age 7), and mental health was measured at MCS4 and MCS5 (age 11) using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Associations between mean daily PA minutes at different intensities at MCS4 and SDQ outcomes at MCS5 were estimated using multiple linear regression models.

Results

In fully adjusted models, increased PA at MCS4 was associated with fewer peer problems in boys and girls at MCS5. Greater sedentary time was associated with more peer problems and fewer hyperactivity symptoms in boys and girls. Increased MVPA was associated with more conduct and hyperactivity problems in boys and more hyperactivity in girls.

Where are we going and how do we get there? A study of Oxford University Press Pathways to School Improvement

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22 February 2018 15:30 - 17:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Susila Davies, University of Oxford (DPhil student)

This study explores the workings of, and practitioner engagement with, a selection of online resources provided by the Oxford University Press (OUP) for school improvement. On 5 November 2013, the OUP launched ‘Pathways’, an online ‘four-step system’ to school improvement comprising the following phases: ‘audit’, ‘strategic planning’, ‘take action’ and ‘evaluate impact’. The resources aim to support primary schools through a range of whole school improvement and teaching and learning tasks. This research studies primary school practitioner perceptions and attitudes towards OUP Pathways and both collective and individual improvement practice via an embedded multi-method case study comprising a purposive sample of five primary schools that signed up to use Pathways. It also follows the evolution of the Pathways themselves using a “design-based research” (DBR) framework - which attempts to bridge the realms of academia and external, more practical contexts. The study also examines how practitioners, particularly school leaders, use different forms of evidence to inform their practice and support collaborative working with their colleagues, using a mixture of resources that may have included Pathways. In an era of growing interest in the use of online technology to support various aspects of educational practice including e-resources for pupils and parents, this research focuses on how teachers engage with technology in their school improvement practice and their perceptions of such technology in their professional development experiences. Hence this study aims to investigate the nexus between two important streams that are normally studied separately or in parallel: school improvement and its links with how knowledge is managed and applied within different teams, and practitioners’ use of digital technologies, particularly in relation to professional development tools designed for primary school practitioners.

Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research Seminar (Details TBA)

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21 February 2018 17:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

TBA

OSAT Reading Group

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21 February 2018 17:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, Oxford Sociocultural and Activity Theory (OSAT)

Reading:

Myra Barrs (2017) 'Rediscovering Vygotsky’s Concept of the ZPD: Stanley Mitchell’s New Translation of ‘The Problem of Teaching [Obuchenie] and Mental Development at School Age.’  Changing English, 24:4, 345-358, DOI: 10.1080/1358684X.2017.1376448

Lev S. Vygotsky (2017) The Problem of Teaching and Mental Development at School Age [Problema obuchenija i umstvennogo razvitija v shkol’nom vozraste], Changing English, 24:4, 359-371, DOI: 10.1080/1358684X.2017.1395165

 

Mindfulness and Resilience in Adolescence: The MYRIAD Trial

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21 February 2018 17:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker:Dr Catherine Crane, Scientific Programme Manager, MYRIAD Project, University of Oxford & Liz Lord, Schools Liaison Lead, MYRIAD Project

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou

This talk will provide an overview of an ongoing Wellcome Trust funded MYRIAD trial, which is exploring the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a school-based mindfulness programme in adolescents. The talk will describe the mindfulness programme being evaluated and provide the background and rationale for the MYRIAD trial, its design and current status. We will also present preliminary findings of parallel research comparing different methods of training teachers to deliver a schools-based mindfulness programme and a qualitative study of the implementation of mindfulness in English secondary schools.

Analysis of qualitative data from an intervention study of feedback perceptions among students and teachers

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21 February 2018 13:00 -
Seminar Room G

Seminar with visiting Associate Professor Ann Karin Sandal Ann Karin Sandals presentation at this seminar relates to the analysis of qualitative data from a intervention study which is investigating assessment practice and responsive teaching in grade 9 mathematics in Norwegian lower secondary schools. The qualitative data was collected pre and post the intervention with students in focus group interviews and group interviews with all participating teachers. Nvivo software is used in the analysis, and the presentation will focus on challenges in the interpretation of data as well as handling 40 different transcripts.

Are children with disabilities in school learning?: Evidence from India and Pakistan

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20 February 2018 17:00 -
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Pauline Rose, Cambridge

Convener: David Johnson, Bronwen Magrath and Monazza Aslam

This event is part of the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in the Education Systems of Developing Countries Research Programme Seminar Series

Despite the advances made in securing access to education for many more children around the world than was the case a decade ago, large numbers still do not have access to formal education; and where they do, many are not learning at all, or learning fast enough to make successful transitions through the education system.

And while there is a concerted effort to redress the learning gap, and indeed the learning divide, our understandings of those policies and interventions that are most likely to lead to improvements in learning for all, especially for the more disadvantaged learners remains partial.

So, how might we improve our understanding of what works to raise learning outcomes for all?

The ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme consists of a portfolio of 29 interdisciplinary research teams, each that undertakes cutting edge research on the manner in which the complex relationships between elements of the education system, the contexts in which they are embedded, and the dynamics operating within the system impact on efforts to raise learning outcomes for all.

This seminar series, organised by the ESRC-DFID Programme Research Lead brings together researchers from across the portfolio of research grants to present their questions, their thinking, and their learning.

For more details, please contact Bronwen Magrath or Gordano Kelava on prl@education.ox.ac.uk

Supporting Students to Apply for English at University

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20 February 2018 16:30 -
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Catherine Redford (Career Development Fellow in English and Outreach Fellow, Hertford College) This session will look at some practical ways in which teachers can support students looking to apply to read English at Oxbridge and other universities. We'll consider what universities are looking for in potential students and think about how best to use electronic resources and supplementary reading lists to stretch and inspire A-level students. Catherine will be joined by an undergraduate English student who will reflect on his/her experience of preparing to apply to university.

Spot the difference: examining variations in writing style

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20 February 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Hilary Nesi, Coventry University

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs

Referential choice in bilingual and monolingual children: The effect of discourse and executive function skills (Public Seminar)

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19 February 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Ludovica Serratrice, University of Reading

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics

Seminar abstract to follow

Relationship effects: A cross-classified multilevel model that goes beyond teacher and student effects

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19 February 2018 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Tim Mainhard, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg

In line with the work of David Kenny, it can be argued that the specific relationship that evolves between a teacher and a student potentially drives students’ classroom experiences. Variability in student measures (like questionnaire or assessment data) can be decomposed not only into the commonly investigated student and teacher facets but also into facets representing specific pairings of teachers with classes and students (so-called relationship effects). Conceptually such an approach seems ecologically appropriate, as it goes beyond merely assuming stable teacher and student effects that stay the same no matter who is teaching or who is taught (i.e., the specific combination of a teacher and a student or a classroom group). These effects can be assessed with cross-classified multilevel models.  Consistent with our assumptions, we applied a cross-classified multilevel model of 8042 student ratings of enjoyment (1668  secondary school students, Mage = 14.94 nested in 91 teachers). Our findings showed that that a considerable amount of variability in student enjoyment that is usually viewed as a stable, idiosyncratic student effect, is actually due to relationship effects involving teachers. This indicates that teachers may be more important for students’ classroom experiences, like engagement or motivation, than previous research has indicated.

Enriching data generation using concept mapping

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15 February 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar A

Speaker: Dr Steven Puttick, Bishop Grosseteste

Convener: Jason Todd

Title TBA - topic related to early childhood

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14 February 2018 17:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker:Prof. Edward Melhuish, Department of Education, University of Oxford

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou

Education and aspiration in rural Lesotho, India and Laos

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13 February 2018 17:00 -
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Nicola Ansell, Brunel

Convener: David Johnson, Bronwen Magrath and Monazza Aslam

This event is part of the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in the Education Systems of Developing Countries Research Programme Seminar Series

Despite the advances made in securing access to education for many more children around the world than was the case a decade ago, large numbers still do not have access to formal education; and where they do, many are not learning at all, or learning fast enough to make successful transitions through the education system.

And while there is a concerted effort to redress the learning gap, and indeed the learning divide, our understandings of those policies and interventions that are most likely to lead to improvements in learning for all, especially for the more disadvantaged learners remains partial.

So, how might we improve our understanding of what works to raise learning outcomes for all?

The ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme consists of a portfolio of 29 interdisciplinary research teams, each that undertakes cutting edge research on the manner in which the complex relationships between elements of the education system, the contexts in which they are embedded, and the dynamics operating within the system impact on efforts to raise learning outcomes for all.

This seminar series, organised by the ESRC-DFID Programme Research Lead brings together researchers from across the portfolio of research grants to present their questions, their thinking, and their learning.

For more details, please contact Bronwen Magrath or Gordano Kelava on prl@education.ox.ac.uk

Separating Islam from Jihadist Extremism: An Educational Imperative

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13 February 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Terence Lovat, Emeritus Professor, University of Newcastle, Australia and Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Education, University of Oxford Convener: Professor Liam Gearon The seminar will explore the ease with which radical Islamist or Jihadist discourse has utilized Islamic sacred source material to promote its cause.  It will be proposed that such utilization is misplaced, based on poor knowledge of Islamic sources and having the practical effect of destroying Islam’s credibility in the public eye.  The seminar will attempt to unpick the method by which this malpractice has been achieved, one more commonly utilized in Western discourse than is often appreciated.  The seminar will move on to explore the educational ramifications of such methodological practice and the need for a form of religious and theological education that can counter its negative effects and provide much-needed enhanced literacy about the core beliefs, values and practices of Islam.

“It’s like they’re speaking a different language!” Investigating an accidental resistance to school mathematics reform

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13 February 2018 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Brent Davis, The University of Calgary, Canada

Convener: Professor Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Abstract: I examine multiple distinct-but-internally-coherent modes of talking about school mathematics in North America, focusing in particular on the vocabularies associated with “Standardized/Traditional Education” and “Authentic/Reform Education.” I use this analysis to interrogate a surprisingly popular “interlanguage” that seems to echo sensibilities from both Standardized and Authentic Education, but that lacks the coherence of either. Noting how modes of talking are associated with modes of teaching, I point to some of the troublesome implications for mathematics teaching as I draw an analogy between reforming one’s teaching practice and learning a second language.

Social Pedagogy in the UK today: where are we up to and where are we going? (Public Seminar)

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12 February 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Claire Cameron, UCL Institute of Education

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, Rees Centre

Social Pedagogy is often translated as ‘education in its broadest sense’, and brings an educational lens to social problems. This seminar will introduce Social Pedagogy from its origins in 19C Germany, discuss the findings of comparative research focused on looked after children in Denmark, Germany and England, and map recent policy and practice initiatives to adapt social pedagogic approaches to work with children, young people, and families in multiple settings in the UK. I will finish by presenting ongoing work to develop infrastructure for the development of social pedagogy in the UK.

Looking to like: A circumplex analysis of the gaze- and culture-specific nature of teacher interpersonal behaviour

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12 February 2018 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Nora McIntyre, University of Sheffield

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg

Teachers’ interpersonal behaviour plays a major role in student outcomes.  Teachers’ eye contact with students is likely to be one such behaviour. The current study uses mobile eye-tracking to investigate the link between teacher gaze and student-rated teacher interpersonal behaviour.  Twenty secondary school teachers participated in the UK; 20 participated in Hong Kong.  Teacher gaze was recorded for ten minutes during a teacher-centred part of a naturally occurring lesson.  The Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) was then administered for student reports of teacher interpersonal behaviour.  Linear and circular statistics were used in analysis. Student-rated teacher interpersonal behaviour leaned towards agency with increasing attentional gaze; it leaned towards communion with increasing communicative gaze.  UK students perceived greater agentic tendencies in their teachers, whereas Hong Kong students perceived relatively more communing tendencies in their teachers.  An exploratory mediation analysis showed that teacher gaze did not mediate the relationship between culture and teacher interpersonal behaviour.

TEPLRG Reading Group

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08 February 2018 14:30 - 16:00
Seminar Room D

Reading Group

Jim Hordern (2018): Educational knowledge: traditions of inquiry, specialisation and practice, Pedagogy, Culture & Society, DOI: 10.1080/14681366.2018.1428221

To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/14681366.2018.1428221

Email Katharine Burn for more details

*CANCELLED* Ethics and emotions: handling disclosures and other awkward moments in the group intervention setting

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08 February 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Andrew Marotta, DPhil Education

(Cancelled)

Convener: Alice Tawell

(Cancelled)

Current Topics in Theory of Mind: Implicit Mentalising and individual differences

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07 February 2018 17:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr. Geoff Bird and Jane Conway, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou

This lecture will examine two issues in the Theory of Mind literature: whether humans possess an automatic system to represent mental states (‘implicit mentalizing’); and, how to construe individual differences in the representation of other minds.

Theory of Mind allows us to understand what another person thinks, knows, or believes, and to use this information to predict their behaviour. It may involve explicit processes that require conscious deliberation, and implicit processes that occur automatically and subconsciously. Tests of 'implicit mentalising' have been conducted on nonverbal human infants and nonhuman animals, and such studies have led to suggestions of a potentially innate domain-specific mentalising module in humans. However, these studies cannot rule out alternative explanations of domain-general processes (e.g. automatic attentional cueing) that could account for the effects that have been attributed to implicit mentalising. We will present several tests of implicit mentalising designed to exclude non-mental state processes as an explanation for any effects found, the results of which cast doubt on the existence of an implicit mentalizing system.

To date, the majority of work on the representation of other minds has focused on mental state representation (‘theory of mind’), but has had limited success in explaining individual differences in this ability, and is characterized by the lack of a theoretical framework that can account for variability in the population of minds to which we are exposed. We draw analogies between faces and minds as complex social stimuli, and suggest that theoretical and empirical progress on understanding the mechanisms underlying mind representation can be achieved by adopting a ‘Mind-space’ framework; that minds, like faces, are represented as vectors in a multidimensional psychological space. This Mind-space framework can accommodate the representation of whole cognitive systems, and may help to explain individual differences in the consistency and accuracy with which the mental states of others are inferred. Mind-space may also have relevance for understanding human development, inter-group relations, and the socio-cognitive impairments seen in several clinical conditions.

Examining early development and school readiness of children with disabilities in Malawi through a bio-ecological systems theory

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06 February 2018 17:00 -
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Paul Lynch, Birmingham

Convener: David Johnson, Bronwen Magrath and Monazza Aslam

This event is part of the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in the Education Systems of Developing Countries Research Programme Seminar Series

Despite the advances made in securing access to education for many more children around the world than was the case a decade ago, large numbers still do not have access to formal education; and where they do, many are not learning at all, or learning fast enough to make successful transitions through the education system.

And while there is a concerted effort to redress the learning gap, and indeed the learning divide, our understandings of those policies and interventions that are most likely to lead to improvements in learning for all, especially for the more disadvantaged learners remains partial.

So, how might we improve our understanding of what works to raise learning outcomes for all?

The ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme consists of a portfolio of 29 interdisciplinary research teams, each that undertakes cutting edge research on the manner in which the complex relationships between elements of the education system, the contexts in which they are embedded, and the dynamics operating within the system impact on efforts to raise learning outcomes for all.

This seminar series, organised by the ESRC-DFID Programme Research Lead brings together researchers from across the portfolio of research grants to present their questions, their thinking, and their learning.

For more details, please contact Bronwen Magrath or Gordano Kelava on prl@education.ox.ac.uk

Realities of doing research in applied linguistics: negotiating methodological obstacles

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06 February 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr Jim McKinley, University of Bath

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs

System coherence and cohesion in English further education provision - glass half empty, or glass half full (and what's in the glass)? (Public Seminar)

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05 February 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Ewart Keep, Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, SKOPE

Convener: Professor Alis Oancea, Director of Research

VI form colleges and Further Education colleges in England are, yet again, facing a period of major uncertainty and turbulence as the impacts of:

• marketization;

• funding reductions;

• Area-Based Reviews of provision (leading to college mergers);

• reforms to apprenticeships and the shift to levy funding;

• the devolution of Adult Education Budget from central government to Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) and to Combined Authorities;

• Institutes of Technology (new tertiary institutions);

• the introduction of loans funding for post-19 level 3 plus FE;

• and the complete reform (yet again) of vocational qualifications in the shape of the new T-levels (the vocational/technical equivalent of A levels)

impact on provision and institutions.  These reforms are not a marginal issue.  More 16-19 year olds are in VI form and FE colleges than are in traditional school VI forms, and FE provides the vast bulk of certified adult learning. The speaker will seek to describe and analyse the latest high-stakes ‘skills revolution’, discuss whether the different policies join up, and suggest some of the likely implications that all this will have for learners, local communities, and for education providers.

Learning Analytics in R - with SNA, LSA, and MPIA

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05 February 2018 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Fridolin Wild, Brooks University

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg

This lecture introduces Meaningful Purposive Interaction Analysis (MPIA) theory, which combines social network analysis (SNA) with latent semantic analysis (LSA) to help create and analyse a meaningful learning landscape from the digital traces left by a learning community in the co-construction of knowledge.

The hybrid algorithm is implemented in the statistical programming language and environment R, introducing packages which capture – through matrix algebra – elements of learners’ work with more knowledgeable others and resourceful content artefacts. The lecture provides comprehensive package-by-package application examples, and code samples that guide the reader through the MPIA model to show how the MPIA landscape can be constructed and the learner’s journey mapped and analysed. This building block application will allow the reader to progress to using and building analytics to guide students and support decision-making in learning.

Understanding the developmental conditions afforded through playworlds: Dramatic contradictions between real relations and play relations

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01 February 2018 17:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Marilyn Fleer, Monash University, Australia

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels

Marilyn Fleer holds the Foundation Chair of Early Childhood Education and Development at Monash University, Australia, where she has been the research leader since 2001 for Child and Community Development. She was a former President of the International Society of Cultural-historical Activity Research (ISCAR) and is currently an honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

The original research of Gunilla Lindqvist introduced playworlds as a pedagogical approach for developing children’s play that others have developed further (i.e., Hakkarainen, et al., 2013). One unique feature is the role of teachers acting as play partners in the imaginary playworld. Despite the evidence showing that children welcome teachers’ involvement in playworlds (Lindqvist, 1995), it appears that teachers do not always felt comfortable in this role. What is missing from this research, is an exploration of how teachers and children make sense of their play role in playworlds. Vygotsky’s (1966) conception of play, Kravtsov and Kravtsova’s (2010) concept of subject positioning, and Hedegaard’s (2014) conception of child development (demands and motives), were used to better understand the developmental conditions afforded through playworlds. Specifically, the research examined what new demands were made upon children when teachers entered into their play, as well as studying what demands were made on teachers. Taken from a broader study of 37 Australian early childhood teachers from across six sites as they implemented scientific or engineering playworlds, this presentation will report on one case study of two classrooms over two years. Two teachers and 13 children consented to participate, 5 children were aged 5.9 years (5.5-6.4 years) and 8 were aged 5.1 years (4.7-5.5 years). The central finding of the study was that dramatic contradiction between the real relations and play relations of the teachers afforded new developmental conditions for the children. The results contribute to explaining how playworlds supports children’s development.

Hakkarainen, P., Brėdikytė, M., Jakkula, K. and Munter, H. (2013). Adult play guidance and children's play development in a narrative play-world, European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 21(2), 213-225, DOI: 10.1080/1350293X.2013.789189

Hedegaard, M., (2014). The significance of demands and motives across practices in children's learning and development. An analysis of learning in home and school, Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, 3,188-194,  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2014.02.008

Kravtsov, G. G., & Kravtsova, E. E. (2010). Play in L.S. Vygotsky’s non-classical psychology. Journal of Russian and East European Psychology, 48(4), 25–41.

Lindqvist, G. (1995). The aesthetics of play: a didactic study of play and culture in preschools. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala Studies in Education, 62, 1–234. Uppsala, Sweden: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis.

Vygotsky, L.S. (1966). Play and its role in the mental development of the child, Voprosy psikhologii, 12(6), 62–76.

Developing Scholarly Identity: Agentive Responses to Supervisor Feedback

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01 February 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Kelsey Inouye

Convener: Ashmita Randhawa

The thesis represents the culmination of doctoral education and provides evidence of the student’s competence as a researcher. In composing the transfer paper (research proposal), supervisor feedback is critical in prodding students to evaluate their research goals and expand their knowledge of research design and theory, thereby establishing scholarly identity—confidence, independence in thinking, and the ability to position oneself in relation to others. Situating the transfer paper as a site of scholarly growth, this longitudinal study of two first-year doctoral students investigated the relationship between response to supervisor feedback on the thesis proposal and the development of scholarly identity. Narrative analysis and open coding were used to produce in-depth portraits of the individual experiences and perceptions of each participant. The results suggest that the extent to which each participant was agentive in evaluating and seeking feedback is linked to the development of the student’s scholarly identity. Further, differences in the extent to which participants were agentive in relation to feedback appeared influenced by previous experiences with feedback. These results contribute a richer understanding of the relationship between use of supervisor feedback and growing scholarly independence.

Social and cultural influences on how young children's identities are shaped in a globalised world

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30 January 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Tony Eaude

Seminar Abstract: This session is based on preliminary thinking for a book on how young children’s identities are  shaped and the influence of culture on this. By young children, I mean pre-adolescents, though I tend to split this age group at around the age of 7. I present identity as a construct and a constantly changing narrative, with each person having multiple identities, distinguishing between substantive and situational identities. I shall explore the wider social and macro-cultural influences on how young children's identity is shaped, focussing primarily on aspects such as family breakdown, the fragmentation of communities and weakening of support structures, such as faith-based and community groups, and how images presented in the media including television, computer games and advertising may affect young children’s sense of identity. The approach will be interactive, inviting questions and contributions from different disciplinary and personal perspectives.

Can schools' accountability for learning be strengthened from the grassroots? Investigating the potential for community school partnerships in India

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30 January 2018 17:00 -
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Ricardo Sabates and Dr Ben Alcott, Cambridge

Convener: David Johnson, Bronwen Magrath and Monazza Aslam

This event is part of the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in the Education Systems of Developing Countries Research Programme Seminar Series

Despite the advances made in securing access to education for many more children around the world than was the case a decade ago, large numbers still do not have access to formal education; and where they do, many are not learning at all, or learning fast enough to make successful transitions through the education system.

And while there is a concerted effort to redress the learning gap, and indeed the learning divide, our understandings of those policies and interventions that are most likely to lead to improvements in learning for all, especially for the more disadvantaged learners remains partial.

So, how might we improve our understanding of what works to raise learning outcomes for all?

The ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme consists of a portfolio of 29 interdisciplinary research teams, each that undertakes cutting edge research on the manner in which the complex relationships between elements of the education system, the contexts in which they are embedded, and the dynamics operating within the system impact on efforts to raise learning outcomes for all.

This seminar series, organised by the ESRC-DFID Programme Research Lead brings together researchers from across the portfolio of research grants to present their questions, their thinking, and their learning.

For more details, please contact Bronwen Magrath or Gordano Kelava on prl@education.ox.ac.uk

The development of quantitive reasoning (Public Seminar)

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29 January 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Emeritus Professor Terezinha Nunes

Convener: Professor Gabriel Stylianides

Numbers have two types of meaning: a referential meaning, characterised by the use of numbers to represent quantities and relations between quantities, and an analytical meaning, which is intrinsic to the number system. Each of these meanings relates to a specific form of mathematical knowledge, quantitative reasoning and arithmetic, respectively. After discussing the difference between these two forms of knowledge, I will present in this talk a brief synthesis of research on the development of quantitative reasoning.

 

What do carers do to support the education of children in foster and kinship care?

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29 January 2018 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Aoife O’Higgins, Rees Research Centre, Department of Education, University of Oxford

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg

Children in care are at risk of low educational attainment (Trout, Hagaman, Casey, Reid, & Epstein, 2008). Interventions have been developed to address this problem but systematic reviews of the evidence find that their effectiveness is currently limited (Evans, Brown, Rees, & Smith, 2017). Research suggests that the processes underlying low achievement for this population, which are key to informing theories of change in interventions, are poorly understood (Liabo, Gray, & Mulcahy, 2012; Stone, 2007). This paper speaks to this gap in the literature by investigating risk and protective factors for children in care and in particular what carers can do to support children’s education. This study uses longitudinal secondary data analysis to examine the educational outcomes of 690 teenagers in care in Ontario, Canada. It explores the relationship between carer involvement and the educational outcomes of young people they care for. Latent growth curve modelling and cross-lagged models are used to analyse the course and predictors of educational trajectories and the direction of prediction between school performance and carer aspirations. Findings indicate that school performance remained relatively stable over time, and that special educational and carer aspirations were associated with whether trajectories were high or low intercepts but not the rate of change. In cross-lagged models, time-varying carer aspirations predicted school performance even after controlling for prior performance. This suggests that carer aspirations may be protective factor for educational outcomes for children in care.

 

Surrounded by ‘live data’- the challenges of conducting observations in civics courses for adult immigrants in Germany

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25 January 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Kristine Gorgen

Convener: Nicole Dingwall

According to Cohen & Manion (2011) observations are a data collection tool used “to gather ‘live’ data from naturally occurring social situations” (p. 456). Collecting data in civics courses for adult immigrants in Germany I found myself in constantly changing roles- not a teacher, not a course participant, not invisible, but neither fully involved. As an “observer-as-participant” (Gold, 1958) I engaged in social interactions, was sometimes included in course activities and was, on rare occasions, asked to share my opinion or contribute information.

When conducting observations and finding myself surrounded by live data I encountered two challenges: (1) The struggle to establish an undisruptive presence that allowed for my own natural, unaffected behavior without disrupting the “naturally occurring social situation” I was there to observe. (2) The challenge to separate what is important from what is white noise- because everything seems important. I will first present advice from methodological literature on how to deal with the above-mentioned challenges. Subsequently, I will share my own experience with researcher presence in observation settings as well as discussing how to establish and maintain focus when conducting observations.

Can phonological awareness transfer between languages? An intervention study

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24 January 2018 17:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Yu Wing (Brad) Chan, Department of Education, University of Oxford

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou

Phonological awareness, the ability to manipulate the component sounds of a language, is crucial to children’s language development. There is evidence that the phonological awareness of a language might have transferred to another language, even between English and Cantonese. In this talk, I will introduce the phonetic and orthographic differences between English and Cantonese. Despite these differences, I argue that learning English phonological awareness can improve Cantonese phonological awareness and vice versa because phonological awareness is a language-general ability across languages. A random control trial was conducted to test this hypothesis. In total 162 Cantonese-speaking 5-year-olds were randomly assigned to three experimental groups: English phonological training, Cantonese phonological training, and print concepts control. All children were pre- and post-tested by three types of phonological measures, namely rhyme oddity, onset phoneme deletion, and final phoneme deletion in English and Cantonese respectively. After the intervention, the English training group outperformed the control group in all Cantonese phonological measures, whereas the Cantonese group outperformed the control group in all English measures. Phonological awareness did transfer between languages. I conclude by highlighting the practical implications of teaching phonological awareness in bilingual settings.

Evidence of the Effectiveness of Teacher Education

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24 January 2018 14:15 - 15:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Professor Diane Mayer, Head of School & Dean of Education & Social Work, University of Sydney

Convener:Dr Katharine Burn

This presentation examines the current policy context of increasing attention to the quality of teachers and education globally and interrogates claims that there is little to no evidence of the value of initial teacher education. It examines the global policy context over the past decade and the increasing crisis discourse highlighting the ‘problem’ of teacher education, the perceived lack of classroom readiness of teacher education graduates and the lack of evidence about the impact and value of teacher preparation. The presentation focusses on the Australian context and presents a systematic literature review of relevant research to interrogate these claims, and considers possible directions for teacher education practice and research.

From development to vitalisation: multiliteracies research with deaf communities in India

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23 January 2018 17:00 -
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Ulrike Zeshan, Central Lancashire

Convener: David Johnson, Bronwen Magrath and Monazza Aslam

This event is part of the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in the Education Systems of Developing Countries Research Programme Seminar Series

Despite the advances made in securing access to education for many more children around the world than was the case a decade ago, large numbers still do not have access to formal education; and where they do, many are not learning at all, or learning fast enough to make successful transitions through the education system.

And while there is a concerted effort to redress the learning gap, and indeed the learning divide, our understandings of those policies and interventions that are most likely to lead to improvements in learning for all, especially for the more disadvantaged learners remains partial.

So, how might we improve our understanding of what works to raise learning outcomes for all?

The ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme consists of a portfolio of 29 interdisciplinary research teams, each that undertakes cutting edge research on the manner in which the complex relationships between elements of the education system, the contexts in which they are embedded, and the dynamics operating within the system impact on efforts to raise learning outcomes for all.

This seminar series, organised by the ESRC-DFID Programme Research Lead brings together researchers from across the portfolio of research grants to present their questions, their thinking, and their learning.

For more details, please contact Bronwen Magrath or Gordano Kelava on prl@education.ox.ac.uk

Foreign Language Enjoyment and Anxiety in British classrooms

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23 January 2018 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Jean-Marc Dewaele & Livia Dewaele, Birkbeck, University of London

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs

Interpersonal Relationships and Students’ Academic and Personal Wellbeing (Public Seminar)

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22 January 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Andrew Martin (University of New South Wales, Australia)

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

This presentation draws on a number of large-scale research projects investigating the shared and unique influence of diverse interpersonal relationships on students' academic and personal wellbeing. Data are presented exploring the distinct impact of same-sex and opposite-sex peers, parents and teachers on academic buoyancy, motivation, engagement, classroom climate, school attendance, achievement, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and mental health. The presentation concludes with a discussion of the role of diverse sources of interpersonal relatedness to optimally map onto the many important factors that traverse student development.

 

Growth goals and growth mindset in today's classroom - and in the Age of the Zombie Apocalypse: different perspectives from different methodologies

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22 January 2018 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Andrew Martin, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Australia

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg

Many assessment systems represent a zero-sum game in which some students’ success comes at the expense of other students’ success. To the extent this is the case, education runs the risk of becoming a constant sifting of “winners” and “losers”. Under a growth framework, however, all students have access to a sense of achievement and efficacy. That is, although a student may not outperform his/her peers, they can outperform their own previous efforts. This presentation substantively and methodologically explores academic growth mindset and growth goals and their role in students’ academic achievement and engagement. Recent promising research using diverse methodologies explores the role of growth mindset and growth goals in students’ academic outcomes, including for at-risk students. From an assessment perspective, novel and practical approaches to assessing and mapping students’ academic trajectories are also explored. The presentation emphasizes research in the classroom, but also presents emerging research identifying the role of growth goals in surviving a potential zombie apocalypse.

 

Task-based qualitative interviews

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18 January 2018 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar B

Speaker: Marianne Melsen, VP Graduate Students, Oxford University Student Union

Convener: Alice Tawell

In this presentation, I will explain how task-based interviews can be used in qualitative research. The presentation is based on my Master's research project, where I focused on university students' perceptions of employability. As part of this project, I was interested in exploring how students prioritise their time, and which activities students believe are important for their employability. Based on my research question and practical constraints (such as the timeframe), I decided to use task-based qualitative interviews as my method for data production. The presentation will focus on the benefits and problems of using tasks in qualitative interviews, and the design and analysis of task-based interviews.

 

Can we do more with technology to improve learning outcomes? Insights from 16 Countries in Eastern, Western, Central and Southern Africa

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16 January 2018 17:00 -
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speakers: Andrew Cunningham and Tom Beresford, Aga Khan Foundation

Convener: David Johnson, Bronwen Magrath and Monazza Aslam

This event is part of the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in the Education Systems of Developing Countries Research Programme Seminar Series

Despite the advances made in securing access to education for many more children around the world than was the case a decade ago, large numbers still do not have access to formal education; and where they do, many are not learning at all, or learning fast enough to make successful transitions through the education system.

And while there is a concerted effort to redress the learning gap, and indeed the learning divide, our understandings of those policies and interventions that are most likely to lead to improvements in learning for all, especially for the more disadvantaged learners remains partial.

So, how might we improve our understanding of what works to raise learning outcomes for all?

The ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme consists of a portfolio of 29 interdisciplinary research teams, each that undertakes cutting edge research on the manner in which the complex relationships between elements of the education system, the contexts in which they are embedded, and the dynamics operating within the system impact on efforts to raise learning outcomes for all.

This seminar series, organised by the ESRC-DFID Programme Research Lead brings together researchers from across the portfolio of research grants to present their questions, their thinking, and their learning.

For more details, please contact Bronwen Magrath or Gordano Kelava on prl@education.ox.ac.uk

Literacy and foundation learning in multilingual India (Public Seminar)

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15 January 2018 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker:Associate Professor Sonali Nag (Department of Education)

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL (Families, Effective Learning and Literacy)

In this lecture I will explore the opportunities and challenges afforded by the rich linguistic landscape that is India. I will examine theoretical accounts of literacy development with an eye on the visually distinct orthographies of the region and its unique architecture to capture spoken language. Pedagogical frameworks for supporting literacy development and the many gaps in research that still need addressing will be touched upon.

Airbag moderation: The definition and implementation of a new research hypothesis

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15 January 2018 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: James Hall, University of Southampton

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg

In research the hypothesis of "Moderation" is defined as: The relationship between two concepts varies as a function of a third.  We base the new hypothesis of "Airbag Moderation" upon this idea and define it as: The relationship between two concepts varies as a function of a third - and this third concept is caused by one of the others.  This talk will introduce researchers to this new hypothesis, explain how it challenges a number of conventions in educational and psychology theory, and ends by demonstrating how it can be easily tested using standard statistical software.  An example using 'real life' research data will be shown. UK households that experience greater financial disadvantage are more likely to contain preschoolers with internalising behaviour problems.  However, these households are also likely to use Children's Centres for longer, and this longer term use lessens the association between disadvantage and internalising behaviours.  Therefore, longer term use of Children's Centre functions in a manner analogous to a car airbag: Greater disadvantage triggers greater use of a Centre, and greater use lessens the association between disadvantage and behaviour problems in preschool aged children.

 

Oxford Symposium - Technology and the Language Barrier in Education: From Lebanon to the UK

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08 December 2017 09:30 - 16:00
St Cross College, University of Oxford

Host: Dr Yasmine El Masri

The event purposes are to:

- To disseminate the project led by Dr Yasmine El Masri in Lebanon on the use of technology to reduce the language barrier in science education for Syrian refugees

- Bring the issue back 'home' to the UK and discuss how technology has been used (effectively) in the UK to meet language challenges for migrants

Please see here for more information

Pleased note that spaces are limited. Email Eleanor Gasper to RSVP.

2016-17 Bath interns presentations

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06 December 2017 17:00 - 19:00
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Speakers: (titles to come)

  • Aghogho Omonigho
  • Bethan Thomson
  • Emma Powell

Using life story and life history methods in research on exclusion from school: the methodological benefits and challenges

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30 November 2017 12:45 - 13:45
Seminar Room A

Speaker:Alice Tawell, DPhil Education

Convener: Ashmita Randhawa, Qualitative Methods Hub

Inferentialism, Pedagogy and Knowledge

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29 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Jan Derry University College London/Institute of Education

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, OSAT

 

Executive Functions in Early Childhood: Links with SES and Mathematical Skills

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29 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr Emma Blakey, University of Sheffield

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Mediatising religious education: BBC radio and television for children and schools, c.1920s-1970s (Public Seminar)

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27 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Stephen G Parker, University of Worcester

Convener: Dr Liam Gearon, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

Drawing upon research carried out as part of a Leverhulme Trust-funded project, this lecture provides a selective account of religious educational broadcasting at the BBC between the 1920s and the 1970s. Against the background social change, policy and curriculum developments, it examines the changing aims of broadcasters, the style, content and modes of delivery of programmes, and considers how religious education on radio and television in schools was listened to and viewed by teachers and children in the past. Amongst the larger questions to be considered will be how was the sacred depicted for children; what influences did religious educational broadcasting have upon curriculum RE, and teaching practises; to what extent did religious educational broadcasting prove a vehicle for mooted dechristianisation; and what might be said to be the successes and missed opportunities of religious educational broadcasting?

Stephen Parker is Professor of the History of Religion and Education at the University of Worcester. He has published widely on aspects of religious education in schools, and the history of religion in the twentieth century.

He is a leading contributor to developing international perspectives on the history of religious education. In addition, he has published research utilising social scientific methodologies, and on aspects of the philosophy of education and religion. Stephen is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Beliefs and Values: studies in religion and education.

The research funded by the Leverhulme Trust upon which this lecture is based, will be published in 2019 by Oxford University Press, and titled: Religious Education in British Broadcasting: a history.

Trajectories of emotional-behavioural difficulties among children in care from age 5 to 11.

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27 November 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Eran Melkman, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Children in care are one of the lowest performing groups in terms of academic performance internationally. Nonetheless, little is known concerning stability or change in the developmental trajectories of academic performance as well as about individual, care and school factors related to deterioration as opposed to those related to stable or improved development. Recently, however, it has become possible to link national data sets on the academic performance and care experiences of these children in England. The current study exploited this new opportunity with the goal of: a) examining the overall growth trajectory of academic performance of children in care over three points in time (ages 5, 7 and 11) during their primary school years; b) identifying distinct subgroups of young children demonstrating different trajectories of academic performance during this period; and c) examining whether children’s early individual, care and school characteristics predict their membership in these groups.  To this end, the study linked the National Pupil Database (NPD) and the Children Looked after Database (CLAD) in England for the cohort who were in their KS2 year in 2016. At the focus of this study is a subsample of 1600 children who had been in care during their early years foundation stage on the 31st of March 2010.  National assessments of literacy and numeracy at age five (Early Years Foundation Stage Profile; EYFSP), seven and 11 (Key Stage 1 and 2) were examined, as well as potential child, placement, and school predictors (e.g., ethnicity, SEN, type or length of placement, placement changes, or school size).  The presentation will discuss the findings of this nationally representative longitudinal exploration and their implications for policy, practice and the databases used to monitor outcomes.

Cognitive interviews: peeping into children’s reasoning

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23 November 2017 12:45 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker:Diana Ng, DPhil Education

Convener: Nicole Dingwall, Qualitative Methods Hub

Cognitive interviewing seeks to understand the cognitive processes of respondents as they answer questions. Various researchers have noted that cognitive interviewing contributes to both the validity and reliability of measures by providing data on the relevance and clarity of survey items. Typically used in pre-survey testing with adults, the method has only been recently adapted, using insights gleaned from child development theories, for use with children in educational settings in attempts to probe and unpack their thinking processes. In the specific area of educational testing, researchers have incorporated such methodology for investigating how children understand, think, and respond to test items. This form of cognitive correspondence in assessment is a form of validity evidence variously termed as ‘cognitive validity’ or ‘substantive validity’.

This presentation discusses the use of cognitive interviews as part of a mixed method research design to validate a scientific reasoning test instrument when administered to primary school pupils from Singapore. During the interviews, a structured interview protocol was used to find out how and why pupils interpreted and responded to the questions in the test. This presentation will share some insights into the conceptualisation and design of an interview protocol using actual transcribed responses from the interviews. There will also be some concluding comments about the implications of adopting cognitive interviews as part of an overall research design.

Evaluating the effectiveness of morphological instruction for children with reading and spelling difficulties

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22 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr Danielle Colenbrander, University of Bristol

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Research suggests that instruction in the morphological structure of words can improve children’s reading and spelling skills. However, few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of such instruction for children with reading and spelling difficulties. Therefore, we ran a pre-registered randomised controlled trial comparing a method of morphological instruction called “Structured Word Inquiry” to a comparison treatment called “Motivated Reading”, which consisted of vocabulary instruction and guided discussion of written texts. In this talk, I will present preliminary results from the trial, and discuss practical issues associated with implementation of these interventions.

*UPDATED* Learning with Conversational Agents that Launch Multiple Intelligent Tutoring Systems and Learning Resources (Public Seminar)

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20 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Art Graesser - Psychology and the Institute for Intelligent Systems, University of Memphis

Convener: Dr Therese N. Hopfenbeck

Intelligent adaptive learning environments are destined to become more prominent with advances in artificial intelligence, big data, and learning analytics.

These sophisticated environments are needed for individuals to become proficient in self-regulated learning, communication, collaborative problem solving, systems thinking, reasoning, career planning, and other skills of the 21st century. This presentation focuses on conversation-based computer agents that incorporate advances in artificial intelligence, intelligent tutoring systems, computational linguistics, and discourse processes.  Two recent projects are highlighted: ElectronixTutor and Personal Assistant for Life Long Learning (PAL3).  ElectronixTutor is designed to help Navy sailors learn about electronic circuits; it integrates a collection of intelligent tutoring systems and learning resources on circuits in one integrated system.  PAL3 is designed to guide Navy avionics technicians in lifelong learning throughout their careers in the Navy. PAL3 recommends learning resources on subject matters that range from electronics to leadership.  Both of these projects weave in a broad spectrum of learning resources that have been developed in previous years by other researchers.

Who’s left? Why do some pupils appear to leave school before taking GCSEs?

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20 November 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dave Thomson, Chief Statistician, Fischer Family Trust

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

In January 2017, Education Datalab published an investigation into pupils leaving secondary schools before reaching compulsory leaving age, and before taking their GCSEs. The analysis was undertaken using the National Pupil Database (NPD), a longitudinal record of pupils’ enrolments, attainment in national tests, attendance and exclusions in state-funded schools. In this session I will:

  • Provide a brief overview of NPD and how it was used for this purpose
  • Quantify the extent of the problem and when in a pupil’s school career it is more likely to happen
  • Identify which groups of pupils are more likely to be affected
  • Examine where these pupils go to and the GCSE outcomes they achieve
  • Identify which types of schools are more likely to engage in such practice- and why
  • Discuss the implications for school inspection and research into school effectiveness

Crossing the divide: observer to participant

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16 November 2017 12:45 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Jessica Ogilvy Stuart

Convener: Nicole Dingwall, Qualitative Methods Hub

I will be talking about the challenges of carrying out case-study research in a boarding school which will be relevant to researchers working in bounded communities. One major focus was on the impact of the host environment's cultural values on sojourners. The school I  studied held similar values to those of the sojourners (or at least values which did not prevent progress) and, as a result a third space was created in which students of all backgrounds could renegotiate identities.

I also looked at the role of curriculum in creating intercultural identities. The school had a very particular curriculum which was fascinating to study and may be of interest to others!

Developing students’ understanding of scientific models and modelling competence

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16 November 2017 11:30 - 12:30

Speaker: Mei-Hung Chiu, National Taiwan Normal University

Convener: Professor Sibel Erduran, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Understanding of nature of models and developing modeling competence in science education have gained a lot of attention in the past two decades. Studies have emphasised their core elements around models and modeling in building up their conceptual framework and examining the impact of learning outcomes via modelling instruction. Science curriculum standards (such as NGSS) also pinpointed the importance and value of cultivating students’ modelling competence in school science practices. Taiwan is also aware of this trend in science education and highlighted modeling competence as one of the core competence in learning sciences. In this presentation, I will present a series of studies sponsored by Ministry of Science and Technology in Taiwan, in relation to understanding of the nature of models and modelling instruction. In addition to these studies, I will also present the use of technology (such as Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality) as scaffolds in facilitating students’ visualisation of abstract and complex scientific concepts, and constructing meaningful mental models.

Mei-Hung Chiu is a Professor of Science Education at the Graduate Institute of Science Education (GISE) of the National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU). She has a BS in chemistry (National Taiwan Normal University), Ed.M. and Ed.D. from Harvard University. She has published articles about science curriculum, students’ conceptual understanding and changes as well as mental models and modeling-based text in science learning in international well-known journals. She also co-edited or edited four books, anmely Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of Madame Marie Sklodowska Curie's Nobel Prize in Chemistry by Sense in 2012; Chemical Education and Sustainability in the Global Age published by Springer in 2013, Science Education Research and Practice in Taiwan: Challenges and Opportunities by Springer in 2016; Science Education Research and Practice in Asia: Challenges and Opportunities by Springer in 2016.

Her recent research topics include (1) elicitling students’ conceptional construction and conceptual change, (2) promoting students’ perceptions on scientific models and developing model-based inquiry and modeling competence, and (3) exploring whether facial microexpression state (FMES) changes can be used to identify moments of conceptual conflict scenarios, one of the pathways to conceptual change in science learning.

She was a recipient of the Distinguished Contribution to Chemical Education Award from the Federation of Asian Chemical Societies (FACS) in 2009. With her deep involvement in science education research and practice, she was a recipient of the Distinguished Contribution to Science Education Award from Eastern-Asian Science Education Association (EASE) in 2016.

Language assessment of children from diverse linguistic backgrounds: creating tests across different linguistic and socio-cultural contexts

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15 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr Kamila Polišenská, University of Manchester

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Language assessment of children with English as an additional language (EAL) poses unique challenges. Clinicians often see EAL children’s lower scores on standardised language tests as indicative of language impairment (LI), even when no impairment exists and there is only a need for sufficient exposure to English to catch up with their monolingual peers. Conversely, clinicians may use bilingualism as an excuse for poor language ability when an LI is actually present. Assessments in all of the languages spoken in the UK just do not exist, and even if they did, it would not be practical for teachers and/or clinicians (even with the assistance of an interpreter) to carry out all of the language specific assessments. Education is delivered through the medium of language and it follows that if a child struggles with the language of instruction, i.e. English in the UK, they will not be able to progress with their learning. In this session, I will introduce non-word repetition tasks and review evidence on what they can and can’t contribute to language assessment in the UK and cross-linguistically. Asking children to repeat nonsense has proved surprisingly informative about their language abilities, and has been put forward as a possible clinical marker for LI. A key motivation for developing this novel non-word repetition task, and a strength for clinical assessment, is that it taps verbal processing and memory skills rather than language knowledge and is therefore relatively unaffected by cultural and social differences. Aligned with this, I will also discuss the practical challenges of adapting a language test for particular contexts (e.g. cultural, linguistic, and social).

From knowledge production and policy to professional development and practice: recontextualisation of messages about mastery

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14 November 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Candia Morgan, UCL Institute of Education

Convener: Professor Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

In the last few years, “mastery” has become a feature of mathematics education in England. It is endorsed as an unquestionable part of government policy, and is promoted by both government funded and independent agencies providing resources and professional development for teachers. Schools and teachers identify themselves as “doing mastery”. Yet there is diversity in the characteristics of mastery and of pedagogies associated with mastery as these are manifested in texts from different sources. I shall trace some common themes and differences between discourses of mastery produced in the policy field and in the field of professional development, using Bernstein’s notion of recontextualisation to understand how and why the diversity arises.

Candia Morgan is Professor of Mathematics Education at UCL Institute of Education. She spent a number of years working in initial teacher education but now teaches mainly masters and doctoral students. Her research interests lie in the characteristics and uses of language in mathematics and mathematics education, considering how these function to construe mathematics, teaching and learning and to produce possible positions for students and teachers.

English Medium Instruction research: what do we know so far and what do we still need to find out? (Public Seminar)

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13 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Ernesto Macaro, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Alis Oancea, Director of Research

The exponential growth of English Medium Instruction (EMI) both in Higher and Secondary Education globally has resulted in a similar growth of empirical research on the subject. Of necessity this research to date has been exploratory, single institution-oriented and lacking a clear research agenda that a more established community of practice might have ensured. In this talk I will present some findings from a systematic review of EMI that we have carried out in the EMI Oxford Centre as well as some of our own research. I will conclude with recommendations of what research still needs to be done in order to ensure that decision makers in education are fully informed of its potential dangers as well as its possible benefits.

Ernesto Macaro is Professor of Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford where he is Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI Oxford) in the Department of Education. He teaches on the Masters in Applied Linguistics and on the Teacher Education Program. Before becoming a teacher trainer and researcher he was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years. His current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in classrooms where English is the Medium of Instruction. He has published widely on these topics. Ernesto was Director of the Department of Education from 2013 to 2016.

‘Persistence of the social’: the role of cognitive ability in mediating the effects of social origins on educational attainment in Britain

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13 November 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Erzsebet Bukodi, Department of Social Policy & Intervention

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Marks (2014), on the basis of a summary of existing studies across a range of societies, claims that there has been a general trend towards an increasing importance of cognitive ability for individuals’ educational attainment, net of their social origins. In this paper, we challenge this claim. We pose two research questions to be addressed in the British context on the basis of birth cohort studies. First, how large is the mediating effect of cognitive ability, and is there evidence of any change in its importance over recent decades? Second, does the extent of this mediating effect change over the course of individuals’ educational careers? As regards the first question, we find that only around half of the effects of individuals’ social origins on their educational attainment is mediated via their cognitive ability, as measured in early life. There has been some fluctuation in the mediation percentage over time, but there has been no sustained increase. Moreover, this is the case regardless of how we measure social origins. As regards the second question, we show that the mediating role of cognitive ability changes little in importance as individuals’ educational careers progress, with the possible exception that it declines in the case of an educational threshold relating to upper secondary qualifications. On this basis, we would reject claims that the strong and persistent association that exists in Britain between individuals’ social origins and their educational attainment can be accounted for predominantly by differences in cognitive ability – i.e. there is a ‘persistence of the social’.

He’s a tax evader, you’re just sensible: interviewing people on sensitive topics

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09 November 2017 12:45 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Daisy Ogembo, Law

Convener: Nicole Dingwall, Qualitative Methods Hub

Tax paying is a sensitive, emotive and complex subject; tax evasion is all of that…and illegal! Perhaps it is not the most sensible topic to pick particularly when you intend to interview possible tax evaders. I however set out on a mission to determine how self-employed professionals in Kenya view tax and tax compliance in the hope that I would discover what drives taxpayers to evade taxes and what drives them to voluntarily comply. This presentation tells the story of my fieldwork; I discuss the challenges I faced, the unexpected victories and the interviews that were total failure. I present here some lessons that I learnt about interviewing respondents on sensitive topics in such a way that you do not come across as offensive or off-putting but still encourage candid dialogue. I discovered that interviewing a tax evader may appear pointless but it can be done, with a little planning, tact, compromise on ideal research methods and plenty of flexibility!

Cultural historical activity theory and research

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08 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, OSAT

The role of input in language acquisition: Insights from computational and behavioural studies

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08 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr Jelena Mirkovic, York St. John and University of York

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Stability and change in developmental language disorders (Public Seminar)

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06 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Courtenay Norbury, University College London

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics Research Group

In this lecture I will present data from the Surrey Communication and Language in Education Study (SCALES), a population study of language development and disorder from school entry. From an initial population of 7267 children screened at the end of reception year, a stratified subsample (n = 529) received comprehensive assessment of language (vocabulary, grammar and narrative), non-verbal ability, and behavioral difficulties at 5-6 years of age (Year 1) and 95% of the sample (n = 499) were assessed again at ages 7-8 (Year 3). Language growth was measured using both raw and standard scores in children with typical development, children with developmental language disorder (DLD), and children with language disorder associated with other clinical conditions and/or intellectual disability.

Across the first three years of school there was strong individual stability of language scores (estimated ICC = .95). Linear mixed effects models highlighted steady growth in language (raw scores), and parallel rates of growth across all three groups. There was little evidence, however, that children with language disorders were narrowing the gap with peers (z-scores). Adjusted models indicated that while non-verbal ability, socio-economic status and behavioural skills predicted initial language score (intercept), none influenced rate of language growth (slope).

From school entry, rate of language growth was remarkably similar in three groups of children with diverse language and cognitive profiles. Importantly though, children with multiple developmental challenges were not falling further behind. These findings raise important questions about the timing and goals of specialist and targeted intervention programmes.

Courtenay Norbury is Professor of Developmental Disorders of Language and Communication at Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London. She is the Director of the Literacy, Language and Communication (LiLaC) Lab and is a qualified speech-language therapist. She obtained her PhD in Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford, working with Professor Dorothy Bishop on the overlapping language profiles that characterise autism spectrum disorder and ‘specific’ language impairment. Professor Norbury’s current research focuses on language disorders in a range of neurodevelopmental conditions and how language interacts with other aspects of development. She is also one of the joint editors of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and a founding member of the Raising Awareness of Developmental Language Disorder campaign (https://www.youtube.com/RALLIcampaign).

Helping Inattentive, hyperactive and impulsive young children to succeed at school

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06 November 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Christine Merrill, CEM, University of Durham

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity are behaviours that are commonly seen in young children. If children have severe and persistent difficulties, they may have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This presentation will report the findings of a longitudinal study which has followed the academic progress of a large cohort (around 45,000 children) in relation to teachers’ ratings of inattentive, hyperactive and impulsive behaviours. Children were assessed at the start of Reception and followed up to the end of primary school. The presentation will also describe a cluster randomised controlled trial which evaluated the effectiveness of two school-based interventions that aimed to help inattentive, hyperactive and impulsive young children succeed in the classroom. The long-term outcomes are reported. The implications for educational policy and practice are discussed.

‘The signs of ideas’: dimensions of vocabulary knowledge in English as an Additional Language (EAL) pupils

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01 November 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Professor Vicki Murphy, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Samuel Johnson famously said that ‘Words are but the signs of ideas’ and as such they arguably constitute the most important building blocks of Language.  Vocabulary knowledge is key to good communication and understanding for all pupils but especially so for EAL pupils who may have different levels of English lexical knowledge relative to nonEAL peers.  In this talk, I will discuss what we know about Paul Nation’s three dimensions of vocabulary knowledge - form, meaning, use -  in the context of EAL pupils, and I will argue that while EAL pupils are often as good as, or in some cases better than, nonEAL pupils on measures of form, we know far less about EAL pupils’ knowledge of word meanings and use in English.  Furthermore, the research we do have suggests there are considerable gaps between EAL and nonEAL pupils overall on these dimensions, contributing to gaps in academic achievement.  I conclude by highlighting the need for more research on these under-explored areas and greater effort in developing appropriate pedagogical approaches suitable to multilingual learners.

First language mediated teaching strategies for EAL learners: a systematic review and exploratory randomised trial

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31 October 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Hamish Chalmers, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

English across borders (Public Seminar)

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30 October 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr Mario Saraceni, University of Portsmouth

Convener: Professor Ernesto Macaro, EMI Oxford

A growing amount of attention has been devoted in sociolinguistics to what we may call linguistic border crossings in the last decade or so. With clear references to sociocultural aspects of globalisation, a sizeable body of scholarship has developed specifically examining phenomena such as language hybridity, translanguaging and, in general, language practices in conditions of (super-)diversity. Especially with regard to English applied linguistics and TESOL, this can be seen as being part of a broader process of reconceptualizations of the English language as a trans-national entity which has gone on since at least the mid 1970s.

With this in mind, in my talk I will do two things:

  1. trace the history, and provide a critical overview, of the analytical frameworks within which such reconceptualizations have been theorized and discussed, such as World Englishes and English as a Lingua Franca;
  2. discuss challenges in the ways this scholarship on “English across borders” can (should?) get its message(s) across to audiences beyond the borders of academia: how do we talk about language, nationality, identity, belonging? How do we talk about language change? How do we talk about messy language data?

Mario Saraceni is Associated Head for Research in the School of Languages and Area Studies at the University of Portsmouth, which he joined in 2004. He previously worked in Bangkok, Thailand and in Nottingham, where he received my PhD in 2001. He has travelled extensively in Southeast Asia (Thailand, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Hong Kong), and has also conducted research and presented papers at international conferences.

Dr Saraceni's main research interest is in English and globalisation and his scholarly activity focuses on the political, ideological and pedagogical implications of the forms and functions of the English language outside its traditional "cultural base" (UK, USA, etc.). In particular, he is interested in the ways in which English is de-colonised, de-nationalised, re-nationalised, and trans-nationalised; in the ways in which it is idealised, fetishised, criticised and how all these narratives interface with the lives and the identities of those who use this language. He is interested, too, in the ways in which English is used translingually and how this invites us to re-conceptualize the very notion of 'a language'. In this area he has published several books, chapters and articles. His most recent book, World Englishes: A Critical Analysis (Bloomsbury, 2015), was awarded the British Applied Linguistics Association (BAAL) Book Prize in 2016.

What can genetically-informative research designs tell us about environmental risk?

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30 October 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Lucy Bowes, Department of Psychology

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Longitudinal, epidemiological studies have identified robust risk factors for psychopathology, including exposure to stressful experiences such as bullying. Nevertheless, because the literature is largely based on observational studies, it remains unclear whether these risk factors have truly causal effects. A failure to adjust for all relevant confounders – including genetic confounders – will typically inflate associations between exposure and outcome. This talk will focus on quasi-experimental designs, particularly those using genetic epidemiology to show how such studies can inform our understanding of environmental risk, using examples from my own research on bullying and exposure to poor parenting practices.

Culturally responsive pedagogy: shifting ideas, shifting practice

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26 October 2017 16:00 - 17:30

Speaker: Dr Jane Abbiss, Senior Lecturer, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

STEM and the Studio: an exploration of the role of Studio Schools in technical education

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26 October 2017 12:45 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Ashmita Randhawa, DPhil Education

Convener: Dr Jason Todd, Qualitative Methods Hub

In an effort to promote continued innovation and productivity, the English government has called for a renewed focus on the development of STEM skills. Amongst the surge in new institutions that appear to respond to this call, Studio Schools are a new type of establishment that delivers a 14-19 curriculum blending the academic curriculum with technical specialisms. Designed to tackle the twin challenges of missing skills and youth disengagement, 28 of the 36 Studio Schools open at the time of writing are in fact, STEM-focused. All Studio Schools, in particular, STEM-focused schools, have enjoyed a high degree of parliamentary support; yet, very little is actually known about the role that these schools play in the diverse and busy landscape of English technical education.

This talk will outline the background to and the initial data collection for a multiple case study that seeks to understand how the enactment of STEM policy has shaped the role of Studio Schools. Data collection (semi-structured interviews) for the preliminary study was conducted at two different STEM Studio Schools to build understanding and context for this innovative type of education. Findings from the interviews indicate that the role of the Studio School and the very model itself is in flux; shaped by local, regional and national policies - there is no ‘typical’ STEM Studio School. It was also evident that the role STEM Studio Schools play is, in reality, dependent on the perspective from which they are viewed. These findings are discussed in detail in this talk, with an explanation of how they have been used to guide the design of the larger case study.

Kindergarten of the future in Bavaria: program and evaluation

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25 October 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Professor Hans-Günther Rossbach, University of Bamberg, Germany

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

If “The Youth of the Country are the Trustees of Posterity” (Benjamin Disraeli, 1845), do we need to do more to support young people who are NEET in the UK? (Public Seminar)

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23 October 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Sue Maguire, University of Bath

Convener: Professor Ewart Keep, SKOPE

While some nineteenth century commentators pointed to the social divide that existed, in terms of children’s access to a basic education and their predisposition to experience early labour market exploitation, the challenge currently facing policymakers is to reduce unacceptable levels of social and economic exclusion that threaten to blight many young people’s lives. The purpose of this seminar will be to provide a greater understanding of the label ‘NEET’ (not in education, employment or training), with regard to why the term was first adopted in the UK and why an increasing cohort of young people are assigned this status. It will examine policy initiatives, in terms of early intervention programmes in schools that are aimed at preventing young people from becoming NEET, reintegration or ‘remedial’ programmes, and active labour market policies. Ongoing research undertaken at the University of Oxford highlights a disparity across the four countries within the UK, relating to the support and intervention currently offered to young people in the NEET group. Finally, the continued relevance of the term ‘NEET’ and whether it is helping to disguise, rather than highlight, present levels of youth disengagement will be discussed.

Sue Maguire is Honorary Professor at the Institute for Policy Research, University of Bath, Associate Fellow at the University of Oxford’s Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance (SKOPE) and a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Social and Economic Research (CASE) in Poland. She has been engaged in policy-related research focusing on education, employment and training since 1988. Her research expertise in youth transitions, and specifically the needs of disadvantaged and disengaged groups of young people, has made a significant impact on academic thinking and policy formation nationally and internationally. In the UK, she has provided written and oral evidence to select committees in the House of Commons and House of Lords and is regularly invited to advise on policy development e.g. Cabinet Office, HMT, Department for Education, the former Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, and the Welsh Government.  She has published widely, including journal articles, book chapters and over 40 reports for government departments and other agencies.

The educational progress of looked after children in England: linking care and educational data

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23 October 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Nikki Luke, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

In a recent study (Sebba et al., 2015), we investigated the relationships between young people’s experiences in the care system and their educational achievements in secondary school. In this presentation I will focus on the quantitative aspect of the study, which linked the English National Pupil Database and the data on Children Looked After for a cohort of young people who completed exams in 2013. The presentation will cover the key factors that contributed to young people’s educational outcomes, including individual characteristics, early environment, and experiences in care and at school. Some of the challenges of working with these administrative datasets will also be discussed.

Lessons learnt from working with NGOs in developing contexts

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19 October 2017 12:45 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Yasmine El Masri, OUCEA

Convener: Dr Jason Todd, Qualitative Methods Hub

Carrying out research in developing countries can be very challenging especially when the research context is highly politicised and when access to informants can be best ensured through a mediator like local or international non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Some challenges can arise from the misalignment between the investigator’s research agenda and the NGO’s goals and from the gap between the researcher’s expertise and the NGO’s practices. If not handled properly, this could lead to the difficulty in accessing data and could compromise the investigator’s research plan with potentially serious funding implications.

This session draws on a positive experience collaborating with a local NGO in Lebanon on a project funded by ESRC GCRF “Using Technology in Science Tasks: Reducing Language Barriers for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon in Spring 2017.  Issues relating to research quality, research ethics and diverging priorities will be highlighted and some lessons learnt from working in such a challenging context will be discussed.

‘Uprooted from everything that attaches you’: long-term outcomes of former child migrants

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18 October 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Elizabeth Fernandez, Professor of Social Work, University of New South Wales

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, Rees Centre

This presentation reports research which examines the in-care and post-care experience of people who lived in Australian child welfare institutions and other substitute care as children between 1930‒1989. It will cover specifically the experience of the former Child Migrant cohort within the study. The study’s key findings indicate that trauma and attachment disruption experienced by children upon removal to long-term placements in the United Kingdom often intensified following forced migration to Australia. Upon relocation, many child migrants found themselves living and labouring in large institutions located in remote rural or regional areas. The Australian institutions were almost always socially and emotionally alienating and were often characterised by oppressive child rearing practices that gave licence to serious abuse of all types and gross neglect. The consequences of maltreatment in care extended well beyond their childhoods persisting into adulthood. Addressing the needs of this vulnerable ageing cohort is clearly an urgent social justice imperative. The presentation will draw on both quantitative findings and voices of research participants. Implications of the findings for redress and reparation, and for policy and practice in contemporary out of home care systems will be discussed.

Elizabeth Fernandez is Professor of Social Work, School of Social Sciences (Social Work Programme), University of New South Wales, Australia. Her research focuses on child and family poverty, pathways and outcomes for children in care, early intervention and family support, reunification of separated children and outcomes of care leavers. She has led several Australian Research Council funded research studies focusing on these themes, and most recently serves as the Principal Researcher on a national study of the long-term outcomes of adult care leavers. She has been a research advisor to major research projects in child welfare and undertaken consultative roles to the Government and Non-Government Sector and the Judiciary. She is Associate Editor of Journal of Child and Family Studies and serves on the Editorial Boards of Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Children Australia, She is a Board Member of the International Society for Child Indicators (ISCI), Founding Member and Executive Board Member of the International Association for Outcome Based Evaluation and Research on Family and Children’s Services (IAOBERfcs) and Chairs the Scientific Committee of the Association of Children’s Welfare Agencies (ACWA), Biennial National Conferences and its Research Forum.

2016 MSc CDE dissertation projects

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18 October 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Speakers:

  • James Beaufils Staff perceptions of education and educational improvement for young people while under the supervision of Secure Children’s Homes
  • Lily Fritz Children’s use of personal knowledge and adult testimony in fantasy/reality distinctions
  • Pinar Kolancali Bilingual children’s language and literacy skills following naturalistic experiences and a sound awareness intervention delivered in their dominant language: a case study in a Turkish-English kindergarten
  • Valeria Ortiz Villalobos The relationship between the home literacy environment and children's school readiness in Costa Rican families: An exploratory study

Interventions for pupils with difficulties in arithmetic

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17 October 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Ann Dowker, Department of Experimental Psychology

Convener: Professor Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Difficulty with arithmetic is a common problem for children and adults. I will discuss some of the research that has been done over the years on interventions for pupils with difficulty in numeracy. The majority of interventions involve primary school children, though there are also an increasing number of interventions with preschool children and with secondary school pupils. Interventions can be of various levels of intensiveness, ranging from whole-class approaches that take account of individual differences through small-group and limited-time individual interventions to extended-time individual interventions. Interventions may emphasize peer tuition and group collaboration; board and computer games; and/or assessing children’s strengths and weaknesses in different components of mathematics; and targeting remedial activities to the assessed weaknesses. In particular, I will give some description of Catch Up Numeracy, an intervention that I have developed in collaboration with Graham Sigley and others at Catch Up, a not-for-profit educational charity. This is a targeted component-based, relatively light-touch intervention for primary school pupils struggling with numeracy, which is delivered by teaching assistants in two fifteen-minute individual sessions per week.

Ann Dowker is University Research Lecturer at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford. She has carried out extensive research on mathematical development and mathematical difficulties. She is the lead researcher on the Catch Up Numeracy intervention project. She has published numerous academic articles; produced two reports for the British government on ‘What works for children with mathematical difficulties?’; and is currently completing a review of mathematics interventions for the Education Endowment Foundation. She is author of ‘Individual Differences in Arithmetic: Implications for Psychology, Neuroscience and Education’ (Psychology Press, 2005).

Integrating emotion into the debate around bilingualism and cognitive control: a bilingual advantage in salience detection?

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17 October 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Anna Niedbala, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Research surrounding ‘bilingual advantages’—enhanced cognitive performance associated with proficiency in more than one language—has been fraught with controversy. This is due to a lack of replicability, caused by inconsistent definition and insufficient differentiation of the construct of ‘cognitive control’. This research project lays out a detailed framework for understanding cognitive control, paying particular attention to the often-neglected role of emotion. It tests the hypothesis that bilingualism leads to adaptations in salience detection and selective attention ability in the presence of distracting emotional stimuli. 24 English monolinguals and 24 highly proficient German-English bilinguals completed a combined flanker/go-nogo task: Sets of three faces—male/female and expressing either positive, negative, or neutral emotion) —were shown side-by-side in the centre of a computer screen. Participants were instructed to press a button when the central, neutral face appeared to be the target gender, while ignoring the flanking images, which were gender-congruent or -incongruent and expressed one of the aforementioned emotional states. Results indicated significant group differences in selective attention in emotional flanker conditions: among monolinguals, the difference in reaction times between incongruent and congruent trials (the flanker effect) was significantly larger in positive and negative conditions than in neutral conditions. Meanwhile there was no difference between the positive/negative and neutral conditions in the bilingual group. This supports the hypothesis that bilinguals have an advantage in detecting the task-relevance (or salience) of stimuli and allocating attention accordingly. Results are discussed in terms of the Adaptive Control Hypothesis (Green & Abutalebi, 2013), Pessoa’s (2009) Dual-Process model of cognition—emotion, and Ochsner, Silvers, and Buhle’s (2012) Model of the Cognitive Control of Emotion.

Measurement with no standards: reflections of an unconventional psychometrician (Public Seminar)

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16 October 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr Joshua McGrane, Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA)

Convener: Dr Therese N. Hopfenbeck, OUCEA

The concept and process of measurement has fascinated physical scientists, social scientists and philosophers of science alike, and has been argued to demarcate the scientific status of a discipline of inquiry. As a consequence of this privileged status and attention throughout the 20th century, particularly in the social sciences, the concept of measurement evolved beyond the standard definition that stood (at least implicitly) for millennia, to a far more liberalised form.  In this talk I will argue that these recent transformations have rendered measurement linguistically, semantically and methodologically ambiguous, and encouraged an attitude of expediency by social scientists with respect to their measurement claims, despite the numbers often being used and interpreted in a standard way. As part of this, I will lay out what I believe are some necessary conditions for measurement, and provide my own empirical examples of the measurement of social attitudes and primary-level numeracy to demonstrate the conceptual and practical importance of bringing more rigour to our measurement practices.

Audience participation is encouraged and I have prepared a very brief survey to inform my presentation. Participation is entirely voluntary and confidential, and will be greatly appreciated! - https://goo.gl/forms/o5G87donQ7p8M3B03

Teacher self-efficacy in student engagement, instruction and classroom management in 32 OECD countries: investigating teacher, classroom, principal and school effects

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16 October 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Sina Fackler, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Teacher self-efficacy (TSE) is specified as to which extent teachers believe in their own abilities to successfully teach students, although students might be difficult or unmotivated. It is supposed to be associated with the quality of teaching and is subdivided into three dimensions that reflect key aspects of the teachers work: TSE for student engagement (ETSE), instruction (ITSE) and classroom management (MTSE). In this study we used the second sweep of the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) carried out by the OECD in 2013. The sample consists of 104.358 teachers of upper secondary students, nested in 6.455 schools across 32 countries. Both teachers and principals filled in self-assessment questionnaires. We specified three-level structural equation models (MSEM) using MPlus to (1) take into account factors from the teacher (e.g., teaching experience), classroom (e.g., classroom climate) and school level (e.g., state vs. private school), (2) extend the previously emphasised North American context and (3) investigate jointly predictors that have been used in single studies so far and show the following results: Not all predictors seem to be equally associated with all three dimensions of TSE. Most differences seem to appear among the classroom characteristics with respect to the three dimensions of TSE. Most variance could be explained among teachers, least among schools. Accordingly, the school a teacher works in seems to make a big difference.

An introduction to Vygotsky

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11 October 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, OSAT

This seminar will be based on a reading of:

  • Daniels, H. (2005) Vygotsky and Educational Psychology: Some Preliminary Remarks. Educational and Child Psychology, 22 (1): 6-17.

Please come prepared with questions and Harry and Ian will respond and encourage a discussion.

Collaborative research on classroom talk: opportunities for teachers' learning

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10 October 2017 16:30 - 18:00

Speakers: Dr Nick Andrews and Dr Jenni Ingram, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Nick and Jenni will be reporting on a collaboration between teachers from one mathematics department and two teacher educators. This involved eight meetings over two years and was part of a wider project across two schools that focused on developing students’ talk in lessons (the Talk in Mathematics Project). They will refer to three of the discussion prompts that they used in meetings, including the way in which they worked with video clips of lessons that the teachers themselves had selected and present the findings from their analysis of the talk that followed these prompts. This analysis draws on Clarke and Hollingsworth’s (2002) model of teacher professional growth in order to describe teacher learning.

 

Department of Education Research Poster Conference

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09 October 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Rooms A, B, G & H

The poster conference represents a major opportunity for research staff and students as part of their Research Groups, Forums and Centres to present their work in accessible and interesting ways for the benefit of new staff and students and also to update each other on new work and the progress of existing projects. All are welcome.

The potential of teacher-led randomised controlled trials

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09 October 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Richard Church, Education Development Trust

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Randomised controlled trials in education have tended to follow a similar design - a six months or longer treatment period, pre- and post-test and randomisation of participants to either the control or intervention. However, there are many more options with the possibility of tighter controlled laboratory-style studies and single lesson treatment windows. Education Development Trust gave teachers involved in the DfE Closing the Gap: Test and Learn programme training to conduct experimental research using a wide range of research designs. 48 teachers completed studies. In total, there have now been around 100 teacher-led experimental studies. This presentation will tell you about the types of design teachers use and will also explore the potential of teacher-led randomised controlled trials to promote evidence engagement, teacher voice and agency.

Disputed narratives and contested conversations: Bruner’s influence on the study of language development

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16 September 2017 17:00 - 18:00
Wolfson College

Speaker: Catherine Snow, Patricia Albjerg Graham Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Creative research methods symposium

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28 June 2017 -
Seminar Room A

Oxford Teachers Early Career Development Conference 2017

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24 June 2017 -
St Anne’s College

The professional learning of mathematics teacher educators

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22 June 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Dr Nick Andrews, Charlotte Cooper, Claire Morse, Clare Tope and Amanda Wilkinson

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

This seminar will focus on the professional learning of four mathematics teacher educators who are approaching the end of their second and final year of a part-time MSc in Teacher Education at the Department of Education in Oxford. The opportunities for professional learning afforded by the course will be introduced by Nick Andrews, the course leader. The teacher educators will then each present an overview of the research and development studies with which they have been engaged, and which are now drawing to a conclusion. These will be works in progress, but they offer an interesting mix of studies covering both primary and secondary phases, and working with either in-service mathematics teachers or pre-service undergraduate or postgraduate teachers. Together they give a sense of the scope of what we refer to after Shulman as the knowledge base of mathematics teacher educators and how this is distinct from the knowledge base of mathematics teachers.

Mathematics Education Reading Group

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22 June 2017 15:30 - 16:30
Seminar Room E

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group

Reading: Beilstein, S. O., Perry, M. & Bates, M. S. (2017). Prompting meaningful analysis from pre-service teachers using elementary mathematics video vignettes. Teaching and Teacher Education 63, pp. 285-295.

English Medium Instruction: building bridges for a better understanding

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22 June 2017 -

Value learning trajectories: negotiations on values and memberships

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20 June 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Arniika Kuusisto, University of Helsinki

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

This paper introduces an interdisciplinary examination on value learning trajectories, presenting personal experiences on value learning and value negotiations from various research projects.

The data cover a variety of perspectives to value collisions between personal and social norms and expectations, often closely connected to shared values and thereby the external and internal definitions of memberships and belonging. The critical battle, then, often comes down to one's personal agency and the resilience of individual values when facing pressures for adjusting these.

Besides providing examples on children's and youth's negotiations on values and memberships, the presented data includes examples of value negotiations related to educators' professional trajectories.

The methodological approach derives from mixed methods design combining quantitative and qualitative methods.

‘Meta-ethnography’: an approach to interpretative synthesis

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15 June 2017 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Sonali Nag, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Since 2013, a team of researchers have been attempting an interpretative synthesis of ethnographies conducted in schools, homes or communities of children in low- and middle-income countries.  The outputs from this effort provide a rich description of the contexts within which children’s learning develops, and prompt an elaboration of the circumstances that shape trajectories of children’s learning.  In this presentation I will show the methodology we followed starting with our approach to literature search, the quality appraisal of individual studies and the development of a synthesis framework. I will then show how we ‘put together’ information using two examples: the first focuses on classroom practices around language and literacy learning1 and the second on home environments2.  In both syntheses we juxtapose a socio-cultural perspective and a psycholinguistic framework to examine the underpinnings of literacy and foundation learning.

  • 1Sonali Nag, Margaret J. Snowling & Yonas Mesfun Asfaha (2016), Classroom literacy practices in low- and middle-income countries: an interpretative synthesis of ethnographic studies, Oxford Review of Education, 42:1, 36-54, DOI:  10.1080/03054985.2015.1135115)
  • 2Sonali Nag, Shaher Banu Vagh, Monica Melby-Lervag & Margaret J. Snowling (in preparation), Home Language and Literacy Environments in low- and middle-income countries.

Community playgroup social media and parental learning about young children’s play

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14 June 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr Karen Mclean, Learning Sciences Institute, Australia

Convener: Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL Research Group

Logarithmically decelerating growth in mathematics achievement

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14 June 2017 12:30 - 13:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor David Andrich, Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of Western Australia, Visiting Fellow, OUCEA

Convener: Student Assessment Network (StAN)

The study of growth in educational achievement has relied largely on correlational and descriptive modelling, methods of the social sciences. Using these methods researchers have concluded that achievement in mathematics is greater in earlier than later years of schooling, and that achievements in the two periods are related. However, there is no single mathematical equation that distills the essence of the relationship between variables, the kind found in the natural sciences. This paper demonstrates that growth in means in mathematics achievement of five cohorts decelerates logarithmically; that the rate of growth, therefore, is inversely proportional to the time spent in formal schooling; and that, as shown in compelling graphical depictions, it is crucial to begin a trajectory of achievement during the most rapid growth in the early years. Specifically, means of two large cohorts of Australian students and means of cohorts from two large studies in the USA and one from Hong Kong, all follow a virtually perfect logarithmic growth. In addition, although the rate of growth of educationally disadvantaged groups in the Australian cohorts is greater than that of the educationally advantaged ones, the gap stabilises and those disadvantaged initially remain relatively very disadvantaged. We suggest that a logarithmic characterisation of growth on a quantitative scale as a function of time in schooling may unify the understanding and development of improvement in school mathematics achievement. In addition, it might be a starting point for studying how to capitalise on the rapid growth in the potentially critical period in the early years, and might lead to acknowledging in large scale, high profile assessment studies that the growth on a quantitative scale in the later years of schooling is inevitably slower than in the earlier years.

Getting involved with The Sopranos: television series as medium for self-reflection

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13 June 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Markus Rieger-Ladich, University of Tübingen, Germany

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon, Professor Alis Oancea and Lorraine Foreman-Peck, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

Television series can become a medium of self-reflection. Shows like The Sopranos can function as a mirror of our inner self. They confront us with inconvenient observations and painful discoveries. They know things about us that we didn’t want to know which gives them the potential to work against our self-betrayal. They raise the issue of the human condition. They open up spaces of self-reflection – and confront us with abysses of human existence. They reveal our worst possibilities. They depict human beings as ambivalent creatures that are capable of anything.

Using The Sopranos as an example, I will argue that these characteristics make television series a subject of educational studies and a suitable medium for philosophy of education.

Professor Markus Rieger-Ladich holds the chair for philosophy of education and is director of the Institute of Educational Studies at University of Tübingen, Germany. In his research he is interested in critical theories of education and post-modern aesthetics, especially contemporary novels, television series and architecture.

Assessing practical work in science (Public Seminar)

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12 June 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Neil Wade, OCR and Stella Paes, AQA

Respondent: Dr Sean Page, Head of Science, Lord Williams’s School, Thame, Oxon

Convener: Dr Judith Hillier, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

This public seminar will be given by representatives from two awarding bodies for A-levels and GCSEs in England: OCR and AQA

Each will give their perspective on the following:

  • the challenges of assessing practical work
  • the opportunities afforded by the current system and some of the remaining difficulties
  • how they would choose to assess practical work, and indeed assess science in general, if they could design an assessment system from scratch.

This seminar arose from discussions at the Royal Society educational research conference on assessing experimental science in 11-18 education October 2016, and will endeavour to engage with some of the principles and intellectual challenges of assessment, as well as the pragmatics.

Controlling bias in both constructed-response and multiple-choice items when analysed with the dichotomous Rasch model

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12 June 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor David Andrich, University of Western Australia

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Even though guessing biases difficulty estimates as a function of item difficulty in the dichotomous Rasch model, assessment programs with tests which include multiple-choice items often construct scales using this model. Research has shown that when all items are multiple-choice, this bias can largely be eliminated. However, many assessments have a combination of multiple-choice and constructed-response items. Using vertically scaled numeracy assessments from a large scale assessment program, this paper shows that eliminating the bias on estimates of the multiple-choice items also impacts on the difficulty estimates of the constructed response items. This implies that the original estimates of the constructed-response items were biased by the guessing on the multiple choice items. This bias has implications for both defining difficulties in item banks for use in adaptive testing composed of both multiple-choice and constructed-response items, and for the construction of proficiency scales.

The ethnographer as English teacher: reflections on anthropological fieldwork with young North Koreans in Seoul [PLEASE NOTE CHANGE OF DATE]

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08 June 2017 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Jenny Hough, Department of Anthropology

Conveners: Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

South Korea is a context where proficiency in English carries both practical and symbolic value, serving as a marker of class and associated with social mobility and cosmopolitanism (Park & Abelmann 2004).  In this presentation, I critically reflect on 21 months of ethnographic fieldwork with young North Koreans in Seoul, who frequently interacted with me as an English teacher or conversation partner.  In considering how my position structured our relationships, I draw attention to issues of power, including the question of the role that English played in an ongoing educational campaign which sought to modernise North Koreans as a precondition to their acceptance by South Korean society.

Transitions between school design/practices

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07 June 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Professor Harry Daniels and Hau Ming-Tse, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

Ethical complexities of classroom and professional life: the case of gossip

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06 June 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Patricia White, UCL Institute of Education

Conveners: Alis Oancea, Liam Gearon and Lorraine Foreman-Peck , Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

This paper examines the claim that gossip is damaging to individuals and disruptive to the ethical life of educational institutions.

A rough delineation of gossip and small talk is offered and the suggestion is advanced that gossip, in its disrespect for the lives and experiences of other people, strikes at the heart of moral life: for this reason, it should be avoided by individuals and proscribed by professional codes of conduct.

In the rest of the paper a discussion of five examples suggests that rather than a blanket prohibition a nuanced approach to gossip is more beneficial for the ethical life of an educational institution. The five examples move the discussion away from black and white certainties to highlight the ethical grey areas in which teachers must operate daily. In this way, the immediate topic of this paper, gossip, works as a lens to focus on its underlying concern, the ethical complexities of a teacher’s professional life.

Patricia White is an Honorary Senior Research Associate at the UCL Institute of Education.

She is a former Chair of the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain, an Honorary Vice President of the Society and a member of the Editorial Board of the Society’s journal, The Journal of Philosophy of Education.

Her publications include Beyond Domination: an essay in the political philosophy of education (Routledge, 1983); Civic Virtues and Public Schooling: educating citizens for a democratic society, (Teachers College Press, 1996) and a four-volume international collection of work in philosophy of education, Philosophy of Education: Themes in the Analytic Tradition, (Routledge, 1998) co-edited with Paul Hirst. She has written many papers on ethical and political aspects of philosophy of education. Most recently she has co-edited a Virtual Special Issue of The Journal of Philosophy of Education, which celebrates and opens up the archive of work in Philosophy of Education contained in the first 50 volumes of the Journal.

Education, inequality and institutions: evidence from international assessments 1995-2015 (Public Seminar)

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05 June 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Robin Shields, University of Bath

Convener: Dr Maia Chankseliani, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

This seminar will present recent research the relationship between economic inequality and educational achievement as measured by large scale assessments. We begin by identifying a debate within the literature between those who advocate a "skills premium" for achievement and those who warn against the harmful consequences of inequality for achievement. We use a more extensive empirical dataset and more robust statistical models to show that the relationship between achievement and inequality is moderated by income: in other words, the relationship is different in high-income and low-income countries. The former demonstrates a relationship consistent with the “skills premium” literature, while the latter suggest that inequality has negative consequences for achievement. We then evaluate possible models of the causal relationships involved, looking at varieties of capitalism and capabilities as two alternative explanatory frameworks.

Robin Shields' research investigates global trends in education, with a focus on the application of new or innovative quantitative methodologies. Recently, he has published on international trends in higher education such as flows of international students and communication networks on social media. He is particularly interested in the application of multi-level statistical models, and the statistical analysis of social networks. He has undertaken research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, the European Commission, the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education, and the Higher Education Academy. In 2014, Robin received the George Bereday award for the most outstanding article in the Comparative Education Review, and he currently serves as co-editor of the journal. He is Senior Lecturer at the University of Bath and Director of the Doctoral Programme in Higher Education Management.

Using secondary data to examine the transition of science graduates into highly skilled STEM jobs

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05 June 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Emma Smith, Department of Education, University of Leicester

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Concerns about shortages of highly skilled science, engineering, technology and mathematics graduates are well established and have persisted for some time. Although these claims have been challenged, they have formed the basis of policies directing considerable resources to STEM education at compulsory and post-compulsory levels. In this paper we consider a range of secondary data sources (including data from HESA, the 1970 British birth cohort study and the annual population survey) across a three decade period  to review what they can tell us about the persistence of long term and widespread shortages of highly skilled STEM graduates.

Identifying and disseminating context-appropriate ELT pedagogy: a bottom up enhancement approach

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30 May 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr. Harry Kuchah Kuchah, University of Bath

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

In recent years, ELT professionals and researchers have called for contextually appropriate forms of ELT pedagogy to be developed, arguing that the dominant discourse on ELT methodology, as promoted by local Ministry of Education policy makers around the world, has been largely generated in ideal (North) contexts and so does not reflect the challenging realities of the majority of language teaching and learning contexts in which they are being imposed. Despite these calls, there has been very little research that shows how contextually appropriate ELT pedagogies can be developed especially in the context of large under-resourced primary classrooms in sub-Saharan Africa. In this talk, I report on a research study that attempted to fill this gap by exploring the practices and perspectives of both learners and teachers about what counts as good and appropriate English language teaching in two English medium primary school contexts in Cameroon. In presenting the findings of this study, I highlight the potential contribution of a bottom-up research approach to teacher development which recognises both learner and teacher agency as well as takes account of context in the process of identifying and disseminating good practice.

Questionable research practices, low statistical power, publication bias, and the current replicability crisis

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30 May 2017 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Ilan Roziner, Tel Aviv University

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, Rees Centre for Research in Fostering and Education

In recent years, there is a growing understanding that empirical sciences are in a state of crisis: the replicability crises. In diverse areas, such as cancer research, neuroscience or social psychology, systematic attempts at replicating pivotal research findings fail in the majority of cases. In this talk, I will present the scope of this problem and then attempt to map its causes. These include data fabrication, as well as honest errors in data analysis and reporting; "Questionable Research Practices" (QRP, techniques that allow to reach the Holy Grail of p < .05), especially HARKing (Hypothesizing After Results are Known); and thoughtless application of the dominant Null Hypothesis Statistical Testing (NHST) approach. Then I will review several practices intended to improve the quality of reported research that currently gain in popularity: using larger samples; pre-registration of research hypotheses, methods, and analyses; formal statements assuring the full report of all relevant information in a publication; detailed method description in on-line supplements; public data sharing; and having statisticians involved in all the stages of research planning and implementation. The change in existing practices is slow, but it is confidently spreading to more and more scientific disciplines.

Ilan Roziner is a lecturer in the Communication Disorders Department at Tel Aviv University, Israel, where he also earned his Ph.D. in Social Psychology. His interests focus on practices of assessment and evaluation, research methodology, and advanced statistical applications, such as Structural Equation Modeling and Random Coefficient Modeling. In the past, Ilan served as a head of the Organizational Surveys Sector in Government and was a co-founder and director of a private applied research service. He consults government agencies, non-profit organizations, and academic researchers in the methodology of assessment and evaluation of programs in social welfare, education, and public health. He is a happy father of two, drinks craft ales, and shoots recurve bow.

Recent developments in reading assessment in the USA national assessment of educational progress: an analysis of conceptual, digital, psychometric, and policy trends

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25 May 2017 17:45 -
Ashmolean Museum

Speaker: Professor David Pearson, University of California, Berkeley

Convener: Dr Therese N. Hopfenbeck, OUCEA

The theory practice nexus in teacher education: learning across contexts

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25 May 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Anton Havnes (Visiting Research Fellow), Centre for the Study of Professions, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

The presentation explores students’ conceptions of the relationship between theoretically oriented learning in the higher education setting and the more practice-based learning in students’ placement learning in schools. Based on students’ descriptions of what they learn, and how they learn, in these contexts, four dimensions of the complexity of the theory-practise nexus in teacher education are identified: (1) From the general to the concrete, particular and contextual. (2) From relating to rules and laws about school, pupils and teaching/learning to meeting individual pupils and unique situations. (3) From understanding to application; from knowing to doing. (4) From making plans of upcoming teaching to responding ad hoc to what happens in class. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the traditional notion of “bridging the gap” between higher education does not do justice to these students’ descriptions of learning across contexts. Rather than searching for a “shared vision” (Hammerness 2008), students were concerned about the differences between the contexts. The analysis emphasises discontinuities as a key dimension of the relationship between higher education and work, the need to understand the two systems as functionally diverse, and the importance of preparing students to understand and make sense of the learning opportunities of each context as well as their interrelatedness and their disparities.

Velma and the teapot: generating visual data in qualitative research

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25 May 2017 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Nigel Fancourt, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

In this session, I will explore methods for generating visual data in qualitative research.  First, I consider role of visualisation in research – previously discussed last year in the Qualitative Hub by Alis Oancea - and especially the distinction between participant and researcher generated data.  Then I outline the role of visual data in a recent project on ethical quandaries, which adopted a conversational model of understanding ethical issues.  Four stages of research are described: the process of crystallising a theoretical model of conversation into pictorial designs; the participants’ initial uses of the designs; their visual re-interpretations of these designs; subsequent uses of other designs in further responses. The value of a pictorial design process for allowing participants to engage with the underpinning theoretical model and to reflect on their own ethical quandaries is considered.  Those attending will also be given the opportunity to try out the pictorial designs for themselves.

The social construction of a teacher support team: an experience of teacher education in STEM

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24 May 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Elvia Castro-Félix, Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education, Mexico

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

There is considerable interest in understanding and explaining how a group of university engineering and science teacher educators learn and assimilate new conceptions about their role facing the forces of globalization that are transforming the system of higher education. This presentation adopts the notion of the Teacher Support Team (TST) grounded in Vygotsky’s sociocultural account of the social formation of mind. These structures of meaning provide insight into the role played by the context, the interactions, the needs and the demands of actual activities, agreements and learning processes that this group of STEM teachers undertook as they sought to transform their usual teaching methods that were focused on individual and isolated work in order to create more innovative practices and impact their students’ performance. This experience, based on the epistemological principles of the sociocultural approach, was focused on the educational model that emerges from needs that are perceived and shared through the professors’ interactions, as well as the transitions that such a team undergoes in its actions and decisions.

(E)FL reading from the Croatian perspective

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23 May 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Associate Professor Renata Šamo, Faculty of Teacher Education, University of Zagreb

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

This lecture deals with the research into reading conducted with the Croatian young learners of English as a foreign language, and its focus is on their strategy use as the source of useful insights into the perception of L1 versus L2 reading, the strategic behaviour of L1 readers as opposed to L2 readers, and the identity of accomplished versus less accomplished L2 readers. In addition, it touches upon some implications that the main findings can have in teaching young learners how to read in both languages. The key conclusions have resulted from the lecturer’s continuous interest in reading as a dynamic interactive process, especially related to age as one of the crucial learner factors but also contextualised within the given language learning environment. Since this has been the first systematic research into reading of this type in Croatia, its contribution to the development of conceptual, terminological and methodological suggestions with regard to the Croatian learners of foreign languages in general cannot be neglected

What is this thing called ‘science’ and what should be included in education about science? (Public Seminar)

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22 May 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Sibel Erduran, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Ann Childs, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Science has been a central topic in school curricula around the world. Despite decades of reform on curriculum and pedagogy, science continues to be a problematic subject for many students even at advanced levels. In this the talk, I will argue that a significant shortcoming in school science is limited exposure to how science works, resulting in lack of understanding of what science is about. In order to unpack this argument, I will focus on an area of research called “nature of science” that investigates some fundamental questions about how science works including how scientific knowledge is produced and what community practices scientists engage in. NOS is a subject that has infiltrated curriculum policy documents, such as the recent Next Generation Science Standards in the United States and curriculum strands such as “How Science Works” and “Ideas and Evidence” in the previous versions of the English National Curriculum. The difficulty in addressing NOS in science education is conflated by the factor that the precise definition of NOS is a contested territory itself. In the last few years, the debate around what counts as NOS has been escalating. I will outline some of the recent debates on NOS and argue that the contemporary accounts are limited in their depictions of science. I will illustrate a new framework on NOS that promotes a broad and holistic account of science such that students are equipped with a broad range of understandings and skills about the epistemic, cognitive and social-institutional dimensions of science. I will discuss theoretical and empirical work on NOS particularly with implications for how science education can infuse more coherent and holistic accounts of science.

Sibel Erduran is a Professor of Science Education at University of Oxford and a Fellow of St Cross College. Prior to her move to Oxford, she served as the Director of EPI-STEM, National Centre for STEM Education based at University of Limerick, Ireland. Currently she holds a Distinguished Chair Professor position at National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan and previously, she held Visiting Professorships at Kristianstad University, Sweden, and Bogazici University, Turkey. She is an Editor for International Journal of Science Education, Section Editor for Science Education, serves on the Executive Board of European Science Education Research Association. Her work experience also includes positions at University of Pittsburgh, USA, King’s College London and University of Bristol. Her higher education was completed in the USA at Vanderbilt (PhD, Science Education & Philosophy), Cornell (MSc, Food chemistry) and Northwestern (BA, Biochemistry) Universities. She has worked as a chemistry teacher in a high school in northern Cyprus. Her research interests focus on the infusion of epistemic practices of science in science education including professional development of science teachers. Her work on argumentation has received international recognition through awards from NARST and EASE, and has attracted funding from a range of agencies including the European Union, TDA, Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Foundation and Science Foundation Ireland. Her recent co-authored book entitled “Reconceptualizing the Nature of Science for Science Education: Scientific Knowledge, Practices and Other Family Categories” was published in 2014 by Springer.

YES to linear mixed effect models in psycholinguistics: but how to best use them?

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22 May 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Annina Hessel, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Linear mixed effect (LME) models have become the gold standard in psycholinguistic data analysis, replacing ANOVA and linear regression (Baayen, Davidson, & Bates, 2008). While agreeing on the value of LME in principle, the field has seen lively debates on (1) how to establish the random structure and (2) how to deal with non-convergence. The question is how to best balance power and the risk of a type 1 error, and the answers are varied.

In her presentation, Annina Hessel will review ongoing debates in her field. She will go on to present two prominent ways to implement LMEs on her own eyetracking data, a maximal random structure approach (Barr, Levy, Scheepers, & Tily, 2013), as well as a model selection process adapted from the field of ecology (Pérez et al., 2016). The talk will conclude by reflecting on the appropriateness of each approach to different experimental designs and the possibilities and limitations of applied researchers to make statistical decisions.

Interprofessional learning: finding the patient voice

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18 May 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Helena Ward, Senior Lecturer in Medical Education, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

Interprofessional learning (IPL) in the health professions is defined as two or more professions learning from with and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of patient care.  IPL has been identified as a major focus for educating and training health workforces due to the growing need for more collaborative and patient-centred care.  However a number of challenges to IPL have been noted, including different accreditation frameworks, resourcing, and logistics such as timetabling.  This seminar will report on a partnership between a primary health service and a university whose shared goal was to prepare students and graduates for interprofessional learning and practice.  This collaborative process led to the development of an interprofessional capability framework.  The role of the patient in IPL and the issue of researching the patient voice will also be discussed.

Re-visioning history education

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18 May 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room C

Speaker: Dr Jason Todd, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Drawing on my doctoral study exploring how young people’s engagement with history outside of the classroom shapes the development of their historical consciousness, I address the implications of this engagement for history teachers and young peoples' learning.  My study, building on socio-cultural perspectives, examined the ‘lived experience’ of young people’s memory work. It used the First World War as a context and adopted a mixed methods approach that included work with several small groups of students who constructed their own ethnographic accounts of societal and familial remembering and their emerging historical consciousness. Drawing on the findings I challenge some orthodox conceptualisations of the purposes of history education, and argue for a greater engagement with young people’s affective desires and the remembering  done outside the classroom. While the work has quite specific implications for history teachers related to the ways in which they could enable young people to engage with the complexity of the First World War and understand its continued resonance in the contemporary world, the main aims of this seminar are to:  explore the implications for teachers of better understanding how young people orient themselves in time; and to make the case for a history pedagogy that is more responsive to young people’s needs and their process of making and remaking their identities.

How to stay ‘objective’ (and not become depressed!) when researching your peers: the journey of a junior researcher analysing junior researchers’ journeys

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18 May 2017 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Isabelle Skakni, Visiting Researcher, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

This presentation addresses the ethical and methodological challenges of being part of the population you are studying. Drawing on my doctoral research conducted with PhD students and on my current postdoctoral research on post-PhDs’ experiences, I firstly illustrate some typical issues that characterise the junior researchers’ journeys. Secondly, I discuss the benefits and risks of researching your peers as well as the necessary self-reflection it entails. I finally share thoughts on the trustworthiness criteria (Morrow, 2005) of qualitative research.

Morrow, S. L. (2005). Quality and trustworthiness in qualitative research in counselling psychology. Journal of Counselling Psychology, 52(2), 250.

Continuous time structural equation modelling using CTSEM (2 days)

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18 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Latent transition analysis

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17 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Education and the sacred: Jewish ideas of holiness and the dynamics of teaching and learning - an ethnographic study from Jerusalem

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16 May 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Isaac Calvert, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

In order to concretely explore the relationship between educational practices and the sacred, I specifically investigated the relationship between Jewish ideas of holiness and the dynamics of their teaching and learning as practiced in Jerusalem. Of so many communities that could have served as a first, specific study in this line of inquiry, Judaism in Jerusalem embodied the paramount importance of both education and the idea of holiness within its philosophical and theological traditions. As Jerusalem was especially, perhaps uniquely suited to exploring sanctity and its interactions with lived experience (including teaching and learning), especially within the Jewish tradition, and through the prolonged engagement characteristic of an ethnographic approach there, the connections between sanctity and education were more readily discernible.

While the backdrop of Judaism in Jerusalem may evoke intense and divisive debate in fields as diverse as geo-politics, archaeology, and international relations, all these elements remain peripheral and subsidiary to my more central focus, which is the relationship between the sacred and education. I hope that Judaism’s interpretation of the sacred and the dynamics of its relationship with educational practices will contribute to a deeper understanding of the role and influence of the sacred and belief therein as manifest in and connected to educational practice more broadly conceived, be it religious, secular or otherwise, and serve as a catalyst for further exploration into how other religions, cultures and communities address this topic.

Investigating the impact of extensive reading with data-driven learning

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16 May 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Gregory Hadley, Niigata University

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Data-Driven Learning (DDL), developed in the 1990s by Johns (Johns, 1991), has been shown in numerous studies to be effective among advanced and intermediate learners (Braun, 2007; Charles, 2012; Granger, Hung, & Petch-Tyson, 2002; Sun & Wang, 2003). However, it has had only limited impact among “false beginners”, although small-scale studies have suggested that, with significant levels of scaffolding, DDL has the potential for positively enriching their second language learning experience (Boulton, 2009; Hadley, 2002; St. John, 2001). To date, the linguistic difficulty of currently available corpora has been a major barrier that has precluded these lower-level learners from truly embracing the full potential of this form of second language learning.

I report here on the second iteration of an on-going research project into the use of DDL within an extensive reading program at a Japanese university. The participants were Japanese, French, Chinese and Korean “novice-high” learners, defined here as students of B1 CEFR proficiency level, but who frequently exhibit borderline A2 aspects in classroom interactions. The corpus was developed by Oxford University Press from their Bookworms Graded Readers, thus ensuring that the data presented to students was at an appropriate linguistic level. An experimental group of 12 students used DDL materials based on the Bookworms corpus, while a control group of 11 students had no DDL input. Both groups read extensively (a minimum of 200,000 words over 15 weeks), and participated in similar in-class tasks, the difference being that experimental class also engaged in DDL activities.  The aim of the study was to ascertain whether the use of DDL materials would lead to enhanced vocabulary knowledge and English proficiency in the experimental group. A pre-test/post-test experimental design was employed, using Nation & Beglar's (2007) Vocabulary Levels Test and a C-test (Klein-Braley & Raatz, 1984) constructed from an upper-level Bookworms reader. The results of the pre-test indicated that the experimental group was statistically at a lower proficiency than the control group. Post-test results found that the experimental group caught up with the control group to become essentially the same statistical group, as indicated by C-test and vocabulary levels test results.  The control group, however, improved more in terms of speed reading than the experimental group.

Some possible reasons that could account for these results are considered, based upon a study of student attitudes and constructs through the use of Personal Construct Repertory Grids (Hadley & Evans, 2001; Jankowicz, 2004; Marsden & Littler, 2000). The presentation concludes with a discussion what the further steps are being taken to enhance language learning among novice-high learners through the use of DDL within the context of extensive reading.

The role of university researchers in 50 top inventions, 1955-2005

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16 May 2017 11:00 - 12:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Steven Brint, Distinguished Professor of Sociology & Public Policy, University of California, Riverside

Convener: Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education Research Group

The paper investigates the role of university researchers in the development of 50 top inventions following the Atomic Age.  The list of top inventions comes from the vote of an expert panel convened by an American magazine and includes such familiar inventions as the World Wide Web, genetic engineering, and industrial robots. I compare the centrality of academic researchers in these inventions to that of corporate, government, and non-profit researchers.  I also examine the role of government grants, corporate funding, and philanthropic funding in these inventions.  I find that university-based researchers were the central figures or very important figures in 40 percent of the inventions studied.  Academic researchers were not highly concentrated at the top 50 world universities, but rather were spread over a wide range of universities.  Nor were their contributions limited to early stage (or downstream) research, but instead were distributed throughout the early and refining stages of research, as well as in development activities.  The paper draws out implications of the findings for current policies encouraging academic entrepreneurship as a central mission of research universities and compares the dominant organizational system of academic professionalism to the emerging system of “academic innovationism”.

Longitudinal SEM: higher-order and nested factor models

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16 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Bright Spots Project: the subjective well-being of looked after children and survey development (Public Seminar)

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15 May 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Julie Selwyn, University of Bristol

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, Rees Centre for Research in Fostering and Education

It is increasingly recognised that understanding subjective well-being  (SWB) – or asking people how they feel about their own lives - is key to developing policy that supports our quality of life.  The Measuring What Matters programme (Office of National Statistics, 2011) concluded that people’s objective circumstances can improve but this does not necessarily translate into feeling that life is improving. For example, crime can go down, but people do not report feeling more secure. The ONS and the Children's Society have done a great deal of work on  the SWB of children in the general population but little is known about the SWB of children in care.  Currently only objective measures are collected by the DfE such as educational results, number of teen pregnancies and we do not know how children themselves feel about their own lives in care. Do they identify the same elements as important to their well-being as do children in general population and how might their well-being be measured? What is important to children in care?

This seminar focuses on  the development of an on-line survey  Our Lives Our Care  to measure the SWB of children in care and the findings from the first 611 children to complete it. Eighteen focus groups were held involving 140 children and young people to understand their perceptions of what was important to their well-being. Although there were domains of well-being that were held in common with children in the general population, looked after children identified other domains and their emphasis differed. The work is the product of the Bright Spots Programme, a long-standing partnership between the Children’s Rights charity Coram Voice and the University of Bristol with the generous support of the Hadley Trust. The programme aims to improve the care experiences of young people by enabling local authorities to find out directly from young people about how they are doing in the areas that are important to them and what needs to change for the better. During 2016. 611 children and young people completed the surveys with some surprising results.

Julie Selwyn CBE is the lead author of the ‘Our Lives, Our Care’ research report and Professor of Child and Family Social Work and leads the Hadley Centre for Adoption and Foster Care Studies in the School for Policy Studies at the University of Bristol. She began her career in the 1980s as a social worker before joining the University. She has published widely on looked after children including: the placement of minority ethnic children; young people’s view of foster care; outcomes for older children placed for adoption; contact; and kinship care. Julie provides advice to governments around the world, local authorities and agencies and is a member of the adoption leadership board.

Download the Powerpoint slides as a pdf

Machine learning in digital health

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15 May 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr. Maarten de Vos, Institute of Biomedical Engineering

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

There is currently an exponential growth in numbers and types of connected devices such as tablets, wearables and hand-held devices, that have the potential to revolutionize the amount of data we collect about our health and potentially empower people to live healthier lives. This offers an unprecedented opportunity for consumers to take control of their own health in a highly personalized manner.  Despite the enormous potential, there are also still several challenges that have to be dealt with, in particular around compliance, around extracting robust information from noisy datastreams, deriving powerful biosignatures for different diseases and building machine learning models that can predict disease state. We will illustrate how embedded algorithmic power allows to turn different wearable devices into clinical grade systems for improved diagnosis and management of mental health conditions like bipolar disorder, as well as for objective assessment of neurological disorders like Parkinson’s or Multiple Sclerosis.

Multilevel Structural Equation Modelling

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12 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Playback theatre as change agent: student teachers act out in the English language classroom

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11 May 2017 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Amy Gelbart, Herzog College

Conveners: Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Massada Visiting Fellow, Dr. Amy Gelbart, Head of the English Department of Herzog College, will be discussing her research, which explores the extent to which introducing improvisation and playback theatre to pre-service English teachers during their academic studies encourages the development of student-teacher professional identity and self-efficacy, classroom management and communication skills, as well as enhancing resilience and reflective skills.

Structural Equation Modelling of longitudinal data

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11 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Introduction to Structural Equation Modelling

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10 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

A comparative study of religious education policy in Turkey and England

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09 May 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Abdurrahman Hendek, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

It has long been recognised that education policy has been questioned, critiqued and reformed in response to a variety of supranational and national factors. In the field of religious education, in recent years, there is a growing argument for comparative works to study this relationship between wider factors and religious education policy. In this study, I seek to present a comparison of religious education policy in state schools in two strikingly different countries, Turkey and England, by interviewing various policy actors, to unravel some of the complexities and contestations around supranational and national factors and their influence on religious education policy.

The study reveals that wider factors have shaped religious education policy by constraining and enabling policy actors. Yet, religious education policy can be better understood through a conflict theory lens, because policy actors still respond and interpret wider factors and their influence on religious education policy widely and contradictorily, reflecting their deeply held worldviews and values. Furthermore, in the context of the collision of wider factors and rival policy actors, religious education policy in Turkey and England has tended to converge on confusion, marginalisation, charge of indoctrination and unabated reform talk.

The study suggests that there is a need for sensitising for plurality across and within societies and that plural societies need more open and plural religious education policies.

Developing digital literacy by mapping controversies: revealing echo chambers and the machinery of the internet

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09 May 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Dr Thomas Hillman, Learning and IT Group, Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg.

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon Learning and New Technologies Research Group

This talk will discuss ways that engaging students in a process of systematic mapping of online socio-scientific controversies, such as fracking and vaccines, can help to reveal the actors, structures and machinery at play as controversial issues are performed on the Internet. It will be based on work from a classroom intervention project that aims to investigate what it means to learn about science and engage with issues of technoscientific innovation in a world that relies heavily on digitized information. Scientific findings, arguments and claims from different fields are available through digital media raising issues of concern and controversy that are not only part of science-in-the-making but also generative of new dilemmas in the lives of citizens. The project introduces to classrooms and investigates a digital method where rather than browsing the web in an unstructured fashion to gain information about a particular controversial issue, students use tools to track their online movements as they search for information and then graph or map the resulting network of interacting actors. This invites students to engage with the complexity of issues as they are performed online, to investigate the relationships between actors of differing viewpoints, and to reflect on the technologies of the internet and their role in how controversies are performed.

Introduction to Item Response Theory and Rasch modelling

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09 May 2017 10:00 - 15:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Standards in national examinations: what do they mean? (Public Seminar)

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08 May 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Department of Education and Dennis Opposs, Ofqual

Convener: Dr Therese N. Hopfenbeck, OUCEA

Processes of standard setting and maintaining within curriculum-related assessments form a key strand of educational assessment policies and programmes, and debates about standards are often at the heart of educational reform. Many countries use curriculum-related examinations to select learners for higher education, work and other study options. Some countries also use these examinations as tools to measure school system performance. Given the high stakes nature of these examinations, it is surprising that the ways in which examination standards are conceptualised and operationalised differently across nations has not been given sufficient attention. This is an interesting area because globalisation has begun to impinge on examination systems, but public examination standards are still largely a bastion of the local. The meaning of standards varies between countries and the stated value positions and processes relating to examination standards differ markedly. Additionally, the processes used to set examination standards vary greatly between countries.

The public seminar will present some of the findings from a joint project on Setting and Maintaining standards in national examinations. As part of the project, a three-day symposium was held in Brasenose College, Oxford in March of this year. Experts from around the world came together to discuss the setting and maintaining of standards in national examinations. The project aims to illuminate similarities and differences in conceptual bases and operational approaches to examination standards. In this presentation, we will focus upon the different ways in which examination standards have been defined and outline current work on an ecological model that shows promise in making the current literature more coherent.

Jo-Anne Baird is Professor of Educational Assessment and a member of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She was the Standing Specialist Adviser on Education to the House of Commons Education Select Committee and is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice. She was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Dennis Opposs is Standards Chair at Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation, which is the exams regulator for England. Most of his responsibilities concern standards and assessment aspects of GCSEs and A levels. Recently his main focus has been how reformed GCSEs should be awarded using a new grading scale and on the comparability of standards between subjects. He is currently a member of the executive committee of the International Association for Educational Assessment (IAEA).

Dennis previously held various senior roles in the regulation of examinations, including for QCA - the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority. In his early career, Dennis taught chemistry and other sciences in comprehensive schools in Barnet and Hertfordshire.

Learning analytics in R: with SNA, LSA, and MPIA

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08 May 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr. Fridolin Wild, Brooks University

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

This lecture introduces Meaningful Purposive Interaction Analysis (MPIA) theory, which combines social network analysis (SNA) with latent semantic analysis (LSA) to help create and analyse a meaningful learning landscape from the digital traces left by a learning community in the co-construction of knowledge.

The hybrid algorithm is implemented in the statistical programming language and environment R, introducing packages which capture – through matrix algebra – elements of learners’ work with more knowledgeable others and resourceful content artefacts. The lecture provides comprehensive package-by-package application examples, and code samples that guide the reader through the MPIA model to show how the MPIA landscape can be constructed and the learner’s journey mapped and analysed. This building block application will allow the reader to progress to using and building analytics to guide students and support decision-making in learning.

Longitudinal qualitative study

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04 May 2017 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Professor Lynn McAlpine, Oxford  Learning Institute

Conveners: Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Longitudinal qualitative research is not that common a research approach. So, in this session, we will explore the following questions: What do we mean when we say qualitative longitudinal research? How long is long? What qualitative data collection might you use? What are the strengths and weaknesses?

Developing, sustaining, and scaling up successful classroom-based interventions in mathematics teaching

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03 May 2017 10:00 - 11:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Professor Merrilyn Goos, University of Queensland, Australia

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Education research journals regularly report on small-scale studies that have been successful in changing mathematics teachers’ classroom practices. But it is rare to find large-scale transfer of research knowledge into practice in mathematics education (Begg, Davis, & Bramald, 2003). This presentation will share some early findings from research into an established, research-informed, large-scale professional development project initiated and sustained by a state education system in Australia and involving a large number of schools and teachers. The project has developed a cluster model for bringing primary and secondary school teachers and principals together to analyse student performance data, create diagnostic tasks that reveal students’ current mathematical understanding, and promote teaching practices that improve students’ learning of mathematics. Between cluster meetings teachers try out new approaches and tasks in their own classrooms. The effectiveness of this approach is evidenced by reported improvements in teacher confidence and knowledge and in student achievement and enjoyment of mathematics, changes to mathematics teaching and assessment practices, and an ever increasing number of schools volunteering to join the project and commit professional development funding. Our research seeks to identify critical factors that support these mathematics teachers in instructional improvement on a large scale.

The presentation will begin with an overview of the cluster model and then present some insights from interviews we have conducted with teachers and principal to investigate the following research questions (based on Cobb & Jackson, 2011):

  1. What practices are effective in establishing a coherent instructional system supporting mathematics teachers’ development of ambitious teaching practices?
  2. How and to what extent do teacher networks within and between schools support changes in mathematics teaching practice?
  3. What features of school and district leadership contribute to the scalability and sustainability of a cluster-based professional development model?
  4. What is the role of research and researchers in shaping the classroom interventions?

References

  • Begg, A., Davis, B, & Bramald, R. (2003). Obstacles to the dissemination of mathematics education research. In A. J. Bishop, M. A. Clements, C. Keitel, J. Kilpatrick, & F. K. S. Leung (Eds.), Second international handbook of mathematics education (pp. 593-634). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • Cobb, P., & Jackson, K. (2011). Towards an empirically grounded theory of action for improving the quality of mathematics teaching at scale. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development, 13(1), 6-33.

Merrilyn Goos is a Professor of Education at The University of Queensland, Australia. She is an internationally recognized mathematics educator whose research is known for its strong focus on classroom practice. She has led projects that investigated students’ mathematical thinking, the impact of digital technologies on mathematics learning and teaching, the professional preparation and development of mathematics teachers, and numeracy across the curriculum. In 2004 she won a national award for excellence in university teaching for her work as a mathematics teacher educator. Currently she is Editor-in-Chief of Educational Studies in Mathematics, and a Vice-President of the International Commission for Mathematical Instruction.

Process and product of engaging in video-mediated intercultural exchanges: a case of eTandem interaction between learners of Japanese and English

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02 May 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Yuka Akiyama, Georgetown University/Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

In this talk, I will demonstrate the multifaceted nature of online intercultural exchanges (i.e., “telecollaboration”) by revealing the process (i.e., what happened during interaction) and product (i.e., how participants’ language developed). Specifically, for the former, I trained the participants to provide six different types of corrective feedback (i.e., error correction) and examined (1) how their beliefs about error correction changed (e.g., preference of a particular correction method) and (2) if such beliefs were reflected in the actual practice. For the latter, I examined what linguistic aspects did and did not improve as a result of engaging in telecollaboration for one semester by focusing on comprehensibility (i.e., ease of understanding) and four linguistic constituents that contribute to comprehensibility (i.e., lexical appropriateness, lexical richness, speech rate, grammatical accuracy). The analysis of both the process and product of telecollaborative interaction highlighted the need for telecollaboration research and practice to consider factors that range from personal (e.g., individuals’ beliefs, identity) and socio-institutional (e.g., culture, facilities) to assessment (e.g., “what” to measure).

Children: aspiration, agency, future

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27 April 2017 12:45 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Anne-Marie Sim, Department of Anthropology

Conveners: Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Children's aspirations/futures and children's agency are frequently discussed topics in childhood studies. However, they are infrequently discussed together, and researchers still struggle with their conceptualisations. In this talk, based on a recently completed DPhil, Anne-Marie will use fine-grained ethnographic examples to show how these concepts are fundamentally interlinked: in their everyday practices, children develop a sense of agency through commonplace statements of aspiration and invocations of future.

Anne-Marie's research involved a year and a half of participant-observation with a small number of children aged from 9-12, living on the outskirts of south London. Participating alongside her participants in their everyday practices, she sought to understand the place and meaning of aspiration and future amongst the children themselves, given overwhelming adult concern with children's aspirations and futures. Her detailed ethnography uncovers the fact that claims to agency lie at the heart of children's aspirations.

A masterclass in close reading

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25 April 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Andrea MacRae, Senior Lecturer in Stylistics, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education

Close reading is one of the mainstays of literary study because it requires independent interpretative skill and knowledge. For many students, engaging in close detail with a short extract of ‘unseen’ prose threatens to expose their lack of confidence in their own abilities to understand and communicate meaning. Too often students get stuck at the point of feature spotting, or search desperately for big themes, or feel that they need to demonstrate sophisticated insight into multiple ‘hidden’ layers of meaning mysteriously buried beneath every phrase.

This session will present some principles and practices which can help students overcome some of these fears, misconceptions and hesitations. We’ll look at foregrounding, patterns and cohesion as ways to demystify meaning, and we’ll pitch interpretative impressions against the impressionistic to help students understand the relationships between language, form and interpretation. The approach will be modelled using an extract from The Great Gatsby, and will focus in particular on characterisation and point of view. The session will provide practical, tried and tested take-away tips grounded in stylistic scholarship and pedagogical experience and expertise.

From Financial Literacy to Financial Capability and Financial Well-being: more than a semantic change (Public Seminar)

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24 April 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Elaine Kempson, University of Bristol

Convener: Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Director, Department of Education

There has been a gradual shift in responsibility for social protection of individual citizens from the state to the individuals themselves, who must now operate in an increasingly complex financial marketplace to meet their own social protection needs and those of their household.  This has raised concerns about the extent to which they are equipped to do so and a large body of research relating to financial literacy, financial capability and financial well-being. as well as a burgeoning financial education sector  Elaine will explore the conceptual and practical differences between these three areas of research and how they relate to one another.  To do this she will be referring to qualitative and quantitative research that will be published next month and drawing out what this means for educators and other policy makers.

An introduction to matrix algebra for multivariate statistics

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24 April 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Researching participation in teachers' Facebook groups: Sharing, suggesting, and supporting

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20 April 2017 15:30 - 17:00
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Dr Thomas Hillman, Dr Mona Lundin, Dr Annika Lan-Andersson, Dr Louise Peterson, and Dr Annika Bergviken Rensfeldt, Learning and IT Group, Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg.

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon Learning and New Technologies Research Group

Teachers are increasingly participating in social media to discuss their teaching and instructional issues, particularly in relation to IT. The question is what support for professional learning such discussions offer over time in forums like thematic groups on Facebook. Based a study of a corpus of three years of posts, comments and likes from a Facebook group with almost 13,000 members combined with extensive ethnographic engagement, this talk will discuss issues of methodology and research ethics, along with highlighting findings related to when and how teachers use the group as part of their professional practices.

For more information about this project, please see: http://ipkl.gu.se/english/Research/research_projects/fem/?languageId=100001  

Texts and Teachers: A level English Literature conference

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25 March 2017 09:45 - 15:45
Oxford Spires School

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education

In conjunction with the Faculty of English and the Oxford Education Deanery, the Forum is hosting an event to connect teachers of A level English Literature with researchers working on A level texts. On the day teachers will take part in two 3 hour seminars, each on a different topic in the reformed A level English Literature specifications. Researchers from the English Faculty will design seminars to connect teachers with current research and up to date critical thinking, which will refresh their knowledge, stimulate their thinking, and provide resources for future teaching.  A plenary question and answer session with Professor Elleke Boehmer on diversity and the literature curriculum will top off the day.

The choice of seminars can be found by following the link below. Teachers are asked to opt for their top four options, and will be placed in two of them.

The structure of the day will be:

  • Registration 9.45
  • Plenary with Professor Elleke Boehmer 10-11am
  • Seminar 1: 11-1.30
  • Lunch: 1.30-2.15
  • Seminar 2: 2.15-3.45
  • End of day: 3.45

Lunch will be provided.

Cost: FREE

Thanks to the generosity of the Oxford University Public Engagement with Research fund, the event is completely free and open to all teachers of English Literature A level

There are a maximum of 150 places, and the deadline for registration is March 15th.

Join us for what promises to be a fantastic day of subject-based learning and development!

Register here (https://oxford.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/a-level-day-sign-up-sheet)

Oxford Spires is a member of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Some parking is available at the school but we recommend sharing lifts if you can.

Tablets in mathematics education: a study investigating how teachers view and use tablets in their teaching

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14 March 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Kinga Petroval, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

As mobile digital technologies, such as tablets, are quickly becoming more sophisticated, they hold great potential for teaching and learning. However, digital technologies are being introduced into schools with little guidance for their implementation. It is unsurprising then, as teachers are not given enough information on how to use technologies in their teaching, that there is little evidence of digital technologies having an impact on students’ learning. Recently there is increasing attention on the need for a greater focus on the role teachers play in the way digital technologies are used in the classroom. This talk will draw on my DPhil study in which I spent a year at a comprehensive British school that has implemented a one-tablet-per-student program. My study investigates the way a group of four Year 8 mathematics teachers view and use tablets in their teaching, the changes that may occur in their use and views over time, and the factors that contribute to any possible changes. Preliminary results highlight an important dimension of digital technology use in the mathematics classroom that builds on existing frameworks in the field.

Mathematics Education Research Reading Group

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14 March 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room J

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group

Reading:

  • Ira Raveh, Boris Koichu, Irit Peled & Orit Zaslavsky (2016) Four (algorithms) in one (bag): an integrative framework of knowledge for teaching the standard algorithms of the basic arithmetic operations, Research in Mathematics Education, 18:1, 43-60, DOI: 10.1080/14794802.2016.1141313

STORIES 2017

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14 March 2017 -

Dealing with task uncertainty: complex demands in schools and teachers’ responses

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09 March 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

A substantive-methodological synergy: some highlights of recent research

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09 March 2017 13:00 - 15:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Herb Marsh, Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University.

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub.

In this talk Professor Herb Marsh will present his recent research on substantive-methodological synergies. Synergies occur when existing data is analysed using cutting-edge statistical techniques or new statistical techniques for analysing complex multilevel data in the structural equation modelling framework (the extended alignment method and the generalized latent variable model). Substantive highlights of the presentation include: • the “Cube” model of self-concept which merges previous theoretical models of self-concept (i.e., the Internal/External Frame of Reference model, the reciprocal effects model and the Big-Fish-Little-Pond model), • Long-term Positive Effects of Repeating a Year in School: Six-Year Longitudinal Study of Self-Beliefs, Anxiety, Social Relations, School Grades, and Test Scores • Temporal ordering effects of adolescent depression, bullying and victimisation showing depression is a selection factor that leads to being bullied rather than a consequence of being bullied • New big-fish-little-pond effects showing the negative effect of school-average achievement on subsequent achievement as well as academic self-concept.

Professor Herb Marsh (BA Hons, Indiana Univ; MA, PhD, UCLA; DSc UWestSyd; HonDoc, Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munich ) Professor of Psychology,Institute for Positive Psychology and Education at the Australian Catholic University, and Emeritus Professor at Oxford University. He is an “ISI highly cited researcher” (http://isihighlycited.com/) with 610+ publications, 73,000+citations and an H-index = 135 in Google Scholar (Google Citations), co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series, and has been recognised as the most productive educational psychologist in the world and the 11th most productive researcher across all disciplines of psychology. He founded and has served as Director for 20 years of the SELF Research Centre that has 500+ members and satellite centres at leading Universities around the world, and in 2015 was elected as President-Elect of the International Positive Psychology Association. He coined the phrase substantive-methodological research synergy which underpins his research efforts. In addition to his methodological focus on structural equation models, factor analysis, and multilevel modelling, his major substantive interests include self-concept and motivational constructs; evaluations of teaching/educational effectiveness; developmental psychology; sports psychology; the peer review process; gender differences; peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

A Bayesian logic approach to micro-level qualitative data analysis

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09 March 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Methodological discussions about Bayesian logic qualitative data analysis have been focusing on strengthening the rigour of research designs and data analysis in the fields of political science and history and, in these disciplines, the use of Bayesian logic qualitative approaches has concentrated on macro-level processes. This presentation seeks to demonstrate how other disciplines can take advantage of a Bayesian logic approach to qualitative data analysis. It illustrates how Bayesian logic principles can be adopted for the analysis of micro-level processes. The approach is exemplified by using classroom observation data to analyse the moment-to-moment unfolding of challenging teaching situations in an English secondary school. The Bayesian logic approach to qualitative data analysis, it is argued, allows us to systematically evaluate and update theoretically derived priors through iterations of data analysis. The approach helps us specify which information is most informative when it comes to evaluating particular conclusions and it provides a systematic and transparent way to assess the roles that different pieces of evidence play in the inferences we make from qualitative data.

Resources for navigating competing demands at work: identifying supports through an adaptation of the double stimulation method

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08 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

Many jobs require professionals to navigate competing demands, juggling multiple commitments to settle on a course of action. Understanding which resources professionals make use of in such challenging situations is important for ensuring that professionals have adequate support in these situations. This presentation describes a method for identifying the supports professionals use when they are faced with such problematic work tasks. It presents an adaptation of the double stimulation method, a method receiving renewed attention within cultural historical research. This method, originally used within experimental settings, can be used for the analysis of the moment-to-moment unfolding of real-life situations, allowing us to describe the interplay between artefact mediation and changes in intentional orientations. The approach is illustrated with examples drawn from a study of English secondary school teachers.

Seeking "quick solutions" to persistent problems of students’ learning in mathematics

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08 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Dr Gabriel Stylianides  Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Classroom interaction in lower secondary school: a mixed methods approach

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08 March 2017 13:15 - 14:30
Seminar Room A

A substantive-methodological synergy: some highlights of my recent research

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08 March 2017 -

Religious education and religious diversity

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07 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Mark Halstead, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch).

This paper explores a key problem in the relationship between religious diversity and religious education. It was the desire to show respect for the diversity of faiths in Britain more than anything else that underpinned the adoption of a World Religions approach to RE in all non-denominational schools. But what are the theological and practical implications of this move? The RE teacher must adopt a neutral position between different religions (and between belief and non-belief), and children are likely to pick up that all major world religions are simply different routes to the same spiritual goal, and therefore in a sense all equally true. The effect of this is that where children have been brought up to accept the exclusive claims to truth of their own faith, they are now being required by the school to accept a different framework of belief, namely that their own faith is no more and no less true that any other religion. Parents whose children are in this situation are unlikely to feel that their faith is being respected (which was the reason for the introduction of the World Faiths approach to RE in the first place).

Three ways forward are discussed: (i) abandoning RE altogether; (ii) insisting on a pluralist approach to RE and dismissing religious exclusivity as unethical; (iii) encouraging a frank and open discussion of differences between faiths within RE rather than brushing them under the carpet and trying to create an artificial unity.

The paper draws significantly on a volume published by Bloomsbury last year: Religious Education: educating for diversity, by Philip Barnes and Andrew Davis, edited by Mark Halstead.

Mark Halstead is Emeritus Professor of Education at the University of Huddersfield, and Azman Hashim Fellow and Co-ordinator of the Muslims in Britain project at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Universities: learning from the past for the future

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07 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Safaroz Niyozov, Aga Khan University, Institute of Education, Pakistan

Respondent: Dr Hubert Ertl, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Learning French in the primary school classroom: the origins of morphosyntax (Public Seminar)

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06 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Florence Myles, University of Essex

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Young instructed learners of a second language are known to rely extensively in the early stages on rotelearning and formulaic language; the relationship between this formulaic knowledge, and the eventual emergence of productive morphosyntax, is still poorly understood.

This paper draws on data from a longitudinal study of 73 classroom beginner learners of French, aged 5, 7 and 11. Divided by age, each group received 38 hours of instruction by the same teacher over a period of 19 weeks. All lessons were captured on video and transcribed, providing complete documentation of all L2 French classroom input and interaction. Children’s developing knowledge of French was regularly tested using a variety of receptive and productive tasks, including an elicited imitation test, a receptive vocabulary test, and a role play task.

Previous analyses have shown that the 11 year old beginners made faster overall progress in morphosyntax than the younger children. Here, we explore the relationship between use of formulaic language and the emergence of productive morphosyntax, for the different age groups, in order to explain the apparent advantage of the older group. We analyse children’s French oral productions in two datasets: a) the group role play tasks, and b) the elicited imitation test. We depart from established practice in the scoring of EI tests, which is primarily meaning-based and provides information on test-takers’ overall proficiency (Tracy-Ventura et al 2014), and instead focus on formal features of children’s production (the reproduction of NPs and VPs: McCormick & Zach, 2016). We explore the relative abilities of the different age groups in use of formulaic expressions and in the (re)production of non-formulaic morphosyntax, and discuss the implications for young learner pedagogy.

Florence Myles is Professor of Second Language Acquisition at the University of Essex and Director of its Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi http://www.essex.ac.uk/langling/research/ladeli/). She is the outgoing president of the European Second Language Association (EuroSLA). Her research interests are in the area of Second Language Acquisition (SLA), especially of French and she is particularly interested in morphosyntactic development, in the role of formulaic language in SLA, in how children of different ages learn foreign languages in the classroom, and in theory-building in SLA research. She has directed numerous research projects which have all had the dual aim of investigating learner development in English instructed learners of French and Spanish, and of constructing electronic databases of learner language oral corpora, available on the web to the research community (www.flloc.soton.ac.uk; www.splloc.soton.ac.uk).

Left behind? Educational inequality and social mobility of the most disadvantaged youth in Germany

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06 March 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Bastian Betthaeuser, Department of Social Policy & Intervention.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Research on intergenerational social mobility tends to focus on examining the level of overall social fluidity in society. However, from a social justice perspective it can be argued that the type of social fluidity that matters most is upward mobility from the lowest rung of the social ladder. Based on a newly constructed dataset, this presentation examines the labour market chances of children from parents in unskilled working class positions, relative to children from more advantaged backgrounds, and how they have changed across four birth cohorts in post-WWII Germany. The presentation addresses two main questions: Have children from unskilled working class backgrounds caught up with their more advantaged peers in terms of their labour market chances, or do they continue to be left behind? What is the role of educational inequality in accounting for the low relative labour market chances of individuals from unskilled working class backgrounds?

Wait-time: when, why and how can teachers use pauses effectively?

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02 March 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Jenni Ingram and Nick Andrews, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Oxford Education Deanery

Non-directive and idiosyncratic methods for qualitative data generation

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02 March 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Professor Harry Daniels, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

In this session I will draw on aspects of several research projects which presented challenges in gathering data concerned with the tacit aspects of understanding. The particular concern was with the formative effects of institutional settings. I will discuss the ways in which non directive methods were developed and deployed.

A validation of the Classroom Assessment Scoring system (CLASS) in lower secondary schools

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01 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Sigrun Ertesvåg, University of Stavanger, Norway

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Teachers continue to report that classroom management is one of their greatest challenges in the classroom. Classroom management involves teacher’s efforts to oversee classroom activities such as learning, social interaction, and student behaviour. The secondary version of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS-S) offers an approach to observation of key aspects of classroom management. CLASS has perhaps the best documentation of the available protocols for systematic classroom observation. However, CLASS has previously not been validated in Norway. The presentation will discuss two approaches to the validation of CLASS and results from the examination of the validity in lower secondary classrooms in Norway. Although the discussion addresses the CLASS observation system, it will be of relevance to similar observation protocols. Moreover, some preliminary results from the Norwegian study Classroom interaction for enhanced student learning (CIESL) indicating differences in teaching quality between experienced and less experienced teachers are presented.

Of roles and rules: towards a differentiated theory of professional ethics

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28 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Gerard Lum, King’s College London

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch).

There has, of late, been an increasing interest in the potential of virtue theory to provide a theoretical basis for professional ethics.  While virtue theory’s evident practitioner focus does much to explain its appeal, the approach remains susceptible to complaints that ethical practice should properly be bound by rules, or that practitioners must necessarily have an eye to the ultimate consequences of their actions or to the general good.  My aim here is to outline an alternative theoretical approach, one which by avoiding resort to the traditional deontological, utilitarian or virtue perspectives might provide a more cohesive theoretical basis for professional ethics.

My starting point is to differentiate, first, the three basic role types (the ‘practitioner’ being one such) that I suggest are necessarily implicated in ethical decision-making – something that seems to have been neglected by theories of ethics/ social justice which emphasise variously just one of the three roles.  Second, and drawing on previous work, I distinguish between three fundamentally different kinds of rules which delineate and essentially constitute professional practice; this, again, being something overlooked in the literature relating to professional practice where ‘rules’ are often conceived as being of a single type.  Having distinguished the relevant role/rule types I propose that professional ethics can usefully be conceived as an integrated framework of rules whereby ethical roles are at once both interconnected yet differentiated by dint of being differently configured in relation to the rules.  This, I will suggest, allows for a more coherent theory of professional ethics which can be seen to avoid many of the difficulties commonly associated with classical ethical theories.

Dr Gerard Lum is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy and Education Management at King's College London.  His research is primarily in the philosophy and theory of education. He has a particular interest in epistemological issues relating to education and in recent work has been concerned with questions about professional education and professional ethics.

Schools: learning as a precondition to teaching?

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28 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Margery Evans, Aga Khan Education Services

Respondents:Dr Ann Childs, Department of Education and Dr Barbara Bruns, The World Bank

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Language in action: a study of what makes effective communication in pre-hospital resuscitation teams

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28 February 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Ernisa Marzuki, University of Edinburgh

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Historically, medical training has focused on the development and strengthening of clinical skills. After the adoption and adaptation of the aviation industry’s Crew Resource Management training programme and following a number of studies which highlighted the crucial role of non-technical skills (NTS) in minimising medical errors (e.g. Andersen et al., 2010; Cooper & Wakelam, 1999; Hull et al., 2012; Marsch et al., 2004; Van Wyl et al., 2009), the value of NTS has been acknowledged. There is currently a great deal of interest in the optimisation of teamwork during pre-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. The Resuscitation Council UK recognises that effective communication is one of the major instruments for optimal teamwork, and indeed, all domains in existing NTS measurement tools essentially involve verbal communicative acts. Yet there are no fine-grained linguistic analyses of how raters and/or team members perceive effective medical team communication. Despite the major role of communication in NTS assessments, the question of whether specific linguistic patterns, markers, or practices are associated with high NTS scores has been little explored.

This study aims to identify specific communicative patterns applied in pre-hospital resuscitations through examination of the types and distributions of language categories, using McNeilis's (1995) doctor-patient language categorisation as a basis. Through this, we intend to provide clearer distinctions of what is construed as effective team communication, with the aim of assisting in the production of gold standards for measurement and training of related high-performance medical teams. We also plan to find out whether correlations exist between any language categories and the team leaders’ NTS scores.

A total of 20 authentic videos collected as part of the ongoing Resuscitation Research Group’s training and improvement programme will be transcribed and the contents subjected to linguistic analysis. This included verbal activities regarding information flow, categories of speech act, and politeness markers. A pilot study using simulations revealed that pre-hospital resuscitations proceeded through four recognisable stages. Various types of speech act were involved in the process of navigating this interaction, with directives being used most frequently, especially by the team leaders, but in a variety of forms. As expected, the linguistic patterns in resuscitation teams differed appreciably from those in doctor-patient dyads. Results also showed that politeness measures were duly utilised during resuscitations.

Education and the new Conservatism: social wellbeing, national character, and British values (Public Seminar)

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27 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Gary McCulloch, UCL Institute of Education

Convener: Dr Liam Gearon, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

Conservative policies in education have often been analysed in terms of their neoliberal characteristics.  In the early years of the 21st century, the neoconservative themes of education policy are also highly visible, in particular social wellbeing, national character, and British values, strongly influenced by broader contemporary issues but also by longer-term historical legacies.  In this seminar we will review briefly the key themes of Conservative policies in education in the 20th century before examining the emergence of neoconservative themes over the past decade, continuities and changes in education policy since the 1980s, and current prospects for new and alternative themes.

Professor Gary McCulloch is the Brian Simon Professor of the History of Education and Director of the International Centre for Historical Research in Education at UCL Institute of Education London.  He is currently vice-president and president-elect of the British Educational Research Association and Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies.  His recent publications include The Struggle for the History of Education (2011) and (with Tom Woodin and Steven Cowan) Secondary Education and the Raising of the School Leaving Age (2013). He has recently completed a social history of educational studies and research.

Psychometric scales, social network analysis, ethnographic fieldwork: how can they each help us understand students’ social experiences and sense of community in school?

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27 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Marc Sarazin  Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

What can different methods tell us when trying to understand children’s social experiences, as well as their perceptions of their school as a community and learning environment? In this talk, I present how I used psychometric scales, social network analysis, and ethnographic fieldwork to shed light on these topics in a mixed-method case study of two French primary schools going through a collective music-making intervention (N=71). After describing the background, raison d’être, and design of my study, I examine each method in turn. I present the rationale for each method, with a focus on introducing social network analysis and ethnographic methods. I also look at how I used these three methods and some of the results that they have yielded. I conclude by reflecting on the bigger picture that these methods can create together.

Using video capture analysis with student-teachers in an ITE partnership: supporting the development of student-teachers' subject knowledge for teaching and reciprocal learning between schools and universities

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23 February 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Stefanie Sullivan, Director of Initial Teacher Education, University of Nottingham

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Using stimulated recall: videos as a base for interviews

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23 February 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Sonia Khan, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Video-stimulated recall has been adopted as a valuable technique to gain access to thoughts and decision making processes of others. This presentation will overview the use of stimulated recall in the ongoing research study, which includes video recording of 31 classroom observations from 11 teachers, and how these videos were used as a base for semi-structured interviews in making explicit teachers’ decision making processes in classroom teaching and learning. It will highlight the strengths and limitations of the use stimulated recall as a research method using examples from the data collected, and the ways in which the limitations can be turned to benefit by utilizing the underlying principle of the method.

Exploring expert teachers’ sense making and meaning making of teaching and learning from classroom experiences

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22 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Sonia Khan, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

Expert teachers understand a relationship between teaching and learning as they not only enhance their students' learning but also the growth of their own professional knowledge of practice. The study seeks to gain an understanding of how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of their classroom teaching and learning experiences from sociocultural perspective, and what sense and meaning do they make from those experiences. In the classrooms, teachers introduce subject matter content, which is at the center of teaching and learning, through tasks. Sense making and meaning making happens through interaction with the tasks. The study aims to explore how expert teachers make sense and make meaning from teaching and learning experiences through setting of tasks. This is done by means of a multicase study that involves six English and six Mathematics expert teachers from different schools in Oxfordshire. Analysis will draw on the works of Bernstein and Vygotsky and focus on how institutional and classroom contexts shape human action.

Children Learning/FELL seminar - title to be announced

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22 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Kate Cain, University of Lancaster

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Lessons about reading from the PIRLS international survey for English teachers

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22 February 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Therese Hopfenbeck, OUCEA/Department of Education

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education

PIRLS is the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, coordinated by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). PIRLS provides internationally comparative data about how well children from different countries read after four years of primary schooling. England has participated in PIRLS in all previous cycles (2001, 2006, and 2011) and continues this tradition in 2016. Despite the extensive information that PIRLS provides about the contexts of teaching and learning little is known for teachers. Some other countries (e.g. Norway) engage teachers in the process of understanding PIRLS findings and extracting their implications for teaching practice in ways that have not been attempted in the UK.

Considering the public costs needed to participate in international studies, the link between this form of assessment and its impact on classroom pedagogy is alarmingly low and questions about the use of this data and related research grow more urgent.

The PIRLS for Teachers project (ESRC IAA funded) engaged with teachers to increase their knowledge about PIRLS and their capacity to use data and information provided by the survey. The project further aimed to increase researchers’ understanding of the challenges teachers face in dealing with PIRLS findings and identifying their specific needs and interests.

In this talk I will share experiences of how teachers and researchers acted as co-producers of relevant new knowledge by jointly interpreting the PIRLS findings, addressing new research questions and finding ways in which results can be used to improve teaching practice.

Who are the good immigrants? Teaching and testing citizenship for naturalisation

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21 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Kristine Gorgen, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch).

2016 has seen politicians, the media and the wider public in heated arguments over immigration. In the UK debates raged over the number and characteristics of immigrants that were deemed desirable. Disagreement continues about ways to restrict and manage immigration in a way that yields maximum economic returns and minimum social disruption. One potential outcome of immigration is naturalisation, the process by which immigrants can become citizens of their destination country.

In her research Kristine focuses on naturalisation tests- who gets to decide on the content and design of naturalisation tests, what kinds of questions are asked, what values are implicitly and explicitly supported, what is the relationship of the naturalisation test to debates about immigration and integration. On this occasion she presents a work in progress and shares the results of her literature review.

Kristine Gorgen is a first year DPhil student at the Department of Education and a research assistant at OUCEA.

Contexts: mathematical thinking before and outside of school

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21 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Department of Education

Respondent: Sheila Manji, Aga Khan Foundation

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Becoming a (written) word: using eye movements to index incidental new word learning during reading

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21 February 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Dr. Holly Joseph, University of Reading

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

From mid-childhood onwards, the majority of new words we learn are encountered incidentally through reading (Nagy et al., 1985). Yet little is known about this process, and the circumstances in which vocabulary acquisition is maximised. In this talk I will present two experiments in which the process of incidental word learning is examined in adults and children, using eye movements to track learning trajectories as novel words are encountered over multiple exposures. Capitalising on well-documented effects in the visual word recognition literature, I examine the effects of order of presentation (Expt. 1), and contextual diversity and redundancy (Expt. 2) on the efficiency with which new word meanings are acquired. Overall, results show that adults and children successfully learn some limited semantic information about new words without explicit instruction after as few as six exposures, that reading behaviour changes as a function of context type, that early presented words are learned better, and that it is possible to create a laboratory analogue of the learning process that we observe in real life development. I will also present some preliminary data that suggest that children who speak English as an additional language learn words more than their monolingual peers.

The role of WISE research in supporting creative action and building the future of education through collaboration (Public Seminar)

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20 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Asmaa E. Al-Fadala, Director of Research at the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE)

Convener: Dr Maia Chankseliani, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Dr. Asmaa Alfadala, Director of Research, WISE, will speak about how the World Innovation Summit for Education, through its research and other programs, raises international awareness of education’s crucial role of in the empowerment of communities and transformation of societies. Since its establishment in 2009 by Qatar Foundation, under the leadership of its Chairperson, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, WISE has grown into a thriving global, multi-sectoral platform dedicated to creative, purposeful action in education. WISE has raised the status of education among global priorities, and has established itself as a resource for new approaches to education.

The WISE community is a diverse network of stakeholders who share ideas, expertise, and solutions to address the wide range of evolving education challenges. WISE Research collaborates with recognized, leading experts from the community to produce concrete, focused examinations of core topics, often featuring improved practices in diverse contexts around the world, and including policy guidance for education leaders at all levels.

Dr. Alfadala will present the findings of her research on developing and supporting effective principals with leadership skills that reliably produce improved student learning.

Given the variety of unique school issues and contexts involved, her research is focused on identifying appropriate, innovative leadership development approaches and strategies that can be shown to drive sustainable change in teaching practice with positive impact on student learning.

The research includes case studies illustrating current approaches that systems and schools take to develop and support their principals, with the ultimate goal of identifying key lessons, tactics, and strategies that system leaders can take to build principals’ skills.

Self-efficacy expectations: Their variability over the course of 3-4 lessons in mathematics, and their reciprocal relationship with mastery experiences

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20 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Karin Street, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

In this talk I will briefly present the theoretical background of self-efficacy expectations, including their proposed multidimensionality. I will then present some findings from a study investigating the development of self-efficacy expectations during lessons in mathematics. Specifically, I will present data on self-efficacy expectations over the course of 3-4 lessons in mathematics, when 6th and 10th grade students were learning new mathematical ideas. Furthermore, I will present a structural equation model investigating the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and mastery experiences, over the course of the lessons in mathematics.

Interventions for children’s oral language difficulties

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15 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Charles Hulme, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Emotions: a necessary disposition for learning?

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14 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Kristen Bub, Illinois

Respondent: Zuloby Mamadfozilov, Aga Khan Foundation, Tajikistan

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Identity, cultural capital and the international student

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14 February 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Dr Trevor Grimshaw, University of Bath

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

As higher education institutions continue to internationalise, we are under pressure to re-evaluate how we perceive, represent and interact with students from overseas. Whilst the prevailing discourse tends to perpetuate essentialist notions of 'the international student' as a ‘reduced Other’, insights from the social sciences – including applied linguistics – increasingly encourage a constructivist perspective, which emphasises the complexity, dynamism and mutability of students’ cultures and identities  (Pavlenko & Blackledge, 2004; Holliday, 2005; Kubota & Lin, 2009; Block, 2014).

In this presentation I examine the strategies of self-presentation employed by transnational students in their interactions with academic staff and peers. Through a combination of linguistic ethnography and multimodal discourse analysis, my research has documented instances of day-to-day intercultural communication on campus. These include examples of interdiscourse communication between students and their tutors, the appropriation of students’ identities in university marketing materials, and the participation of students in performances such as the ‘International Evening’.

Transnational students are thus seen to project different selves, in different contexts, and for a range of purposes. In particular, the students make use of autostereotypes as a resource for impression management.  I argue that these actions constitute forms of ‘strategic essentialism’ (Baumann, 1996; Spivak, 2006), wherein the students deploy specific identities in order to build relationships, to justify their actions, to obtain leverage, or to generate content for academic assignments. Identities thus become tradable commodities:  a form of ‘cultural capital’ (Bourdieu & Passeron, 1990).

The findings have important implications for areas such as intercultural awareness training in higher education, the marketing of academic programmes, and international educational research.

The social justice dispositions of teachers and their pedagogic work (Public Seminar)

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13 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Trevor Gale, School of Education, University of Glasgow

Convener: Trevor Mutton, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

The focus of this paper is on how social justice practices are enacted in education, specifically through the pedagogy of secondary school teachers – the subject of a large scale, multi-site qualitative Australian Research Council project.

Informed by Bourdieu’s concept of habitus (disposition collectives), the research conceives of ‘social justice dispositions’ (SJDs): the tendencies, inclinations, and leanings that provide un-thought or pre-thought guidance for socially just practice. I begin the paper with questions of methodology, of definition and justification. Because SJDs are defined as operating between belief and practice, they are difficult to study using conventional methods such as interviews (a simple focus on what is said) or observations (what is done).

While not the only approach taken, the paper foregrounds the use of stimulated recall procedures as technique to provoke teacher participants to ‘speak to practice’, thereby raising to consciousness otherwise unspoken dispositions that guide teacher action in classrooms. I then turn to focus on activism, as one disposition found in the research to characterise teachers’ socially just practice. In identifying moments of ‘subversion’ in teachers’ practices, I examine the activist disposition as the tendency or inclination to struggle against the social order or doxa (Bourdieu, 1977). Bourdieu argues that ‘the immediate adjustment of the habitus to the field – by other principles, such as rational and conscious computation’ (Bourdieu, 1990: 108) means that activism is predominantly confined to ‘radical critique’ of doxa emerging in times of crisis.

Our research both confirms and challenges this account. We see the activist disposition of teachers in subtle forms of radical critique, born not out of crisis but instead part of the everyday practice and indeed the pedagogic work of some teachers. Yet in Fraser’s (1997) terms, this is activism for correcting inequitable outcomes – affirmative rather than transformative. Missing from our data are activist teacher dispositions aimed at ‘restructuring the underlying generative framework’ (Fraser 1997: 23) that produces inequalities. The paper concludes that the social, cultural and material conditions of schools – their field conditions – are important in the formation of activist dispositions, providing them with pedagogic authority to act in socially just ways.

Trevor Gale is Professor of Education Policy and Social Justice, and Head of the School of Education at The University of Glasgow.

He is a critical sociologist of education, and draws on Bourdieu’s thinking tools to research issues of social justice in schooling and higher education.

He is Principal Investigator on two current Australian Research Council projects: Social justice dispositions informing teachers’ pedagogy in advantaged and disadvantaged secondary schools (with Cross and Mills) and Vocational institutions, undergraduate degrees: distinction or inequality (with Webb, Rawolle, Hodge and Bathmaker).

His most recent book (with Lynch, Rowlands and Skourdoumbis), published by Routledge, is Practice Theory and Education: Diffractive readings in professional practice.

He is the founding editor of Critical Studies in Education and is widely published in journals such as Journal of Education Policy, British Journal of Sociology of Education, Cambridge Journal of Education and Studies in Higher Education.

Teacher self-efficacy in student engagement, instruction and classroom management in 32 OECD countries: investigating teacher, classroom, principal and school effects

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13 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Sina Fackler, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Teacher self-efficacy (TSE) is specified as to which extent teachers believe in their own abilities to successfully teach students, although students might be difficult or unmotivated. It is supposed to be associated with the quality of teaching and is subdivided into three dimensions that reflect key aspects of the teachers work: TSE for student engagement (ETSE), instruction (ITSE) and classroom management (MTSE). In this study we used the second sweep of the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) carried out by the OECD in 2013. The sample consists of 104.358 teachers of upper secondary students, nested in 6.455 schools across 32 countries. Both teachers and principals filled in self-assessment questionnaires. We specified three-level structural equation models (MSEM) using MPlus to (1) take into account factors from the teacher (e.g., teaching experience), classroom (e.g., classroom climate) and school level (e.g., state vs. private school), (2) extend the previously emphasised North American context and (3) investigate jointly predictors that have been used in single studies so far and show the following results: Not all predictors seem to be equally associated with all three dimensions of TSE. Most differences seem to appear among the classroom characteristics with respect to the three dimensions of TSE. Most variance could be explained among teachers, least among schools. Accordingly, the school a teacher works in seems to make a big difference.

Speaking in and about the (mathematics) classroom: Lessons from four international studies

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09 February 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Professor David Clarke and Dr Man Ching Esther Chan, University of Melbourne

Conveners: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group and Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

In this presentation, we report and connect the key findings from four complementary projects:

  • student and teacher speech in selected mathematics classrooms in eight countries (The Learner’s Perspective Study)
  • the study of student learning when engaged in individual, pair and collaborative group work (The Social Unit of Learning Project),
  • the role of teacher selective attention in facilitating teacher professional learning (The Learning from Lessons Project) and
  • the identification of the professional lexicon employed by middle school mathematics teachers in Australia and eight other countries to describe the events of the mathematics classroom (The International Lexicon Project).

These four studies find their nexus in the social nature of learning in classrooms. We discuss the implications of the project findings for the optimal functioning of the (mathematics) classroom as a site for student and teacher learning.

Professor David Clarke is Director of the International Centre for Classroom Research (ICCR) at the University of Melbourne. Over the last twenty years, his research activity has centred on capturing the complexity of classroom practice through a program of international video-based classroom research in more than 20 countries. Other significant research has addressed teacher professional learning, metacognition, problem-based learning, assessment, multi-theoretic research designs, cross-cultural analyses, curricular alignment, and the challenge of research synthesis in education. Professor Clarke has written books on assessment and on classroom research and has published his research work in around 200 book chapters, journal articles and conference proceedings papers. The establishment of the Science of Learning Research Classroom at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education in 2015 provides Professor Clarke with access to new levels of detail and experimental precision for his classroom research.

Dr Man Ching Esther Chan is a Research Fellow in the ICCR at The University of Melbourne. She is a registered psychologist who specialises in educational psychology and assessment. She is currently involved in several research projects at the ICCR, and is project manager of The Social Unit of Learning Project, and The Learning from Lessons Project. Prior to joining the ICCR, she worked on several Australian Government funded projects in student wellbeing and achievement, early literacy assessment, and school retention. She was awarded an Endeavour Research Fellowship in 2015 by the Australian Government and was hosted for six months by the University of California, Berkeley.

Reading Group: Getting qualitative studies published

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09 February 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

The editors of Computers and Education have recently published an editorial giving strong guidelines for conducting and reporting qualitative studies in order “to address the problem of the imbalance between the number of quantitative and qualitative articles published in highly ranked research journals”. This reading group will discuss the editorial and its ramifications, as well as considering whether we can reject or accept their contentions.

Attendees are asked to have read the editorial before the session. Peter Twining, Rachelle S. Heller, Miguel Nussbaum, Chin-Chung Tsai, Some guidance on conducting and reporting qualitative studies, Computers & Education, Volume 106, March 2017, Pages A1-A9; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2016.12.002

NB Isabelle Skakni’s talk ‘How to stay ‘objective’ (and not become depressed!) when researching your peers: the journey of a junior researcher analysing junior researchers’ journeys’ has been postponed until Trinity Term.

The epistemological relevance of Peircean secondness for Vygotskian semiotic mediation

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08 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr James Ma, Canterbury Christchurch University

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

This presentation derives from a manuscript prepared for the ISCAR-affiliated journal Mind, Culture, and Activity. It concerns the author’s research project on the Peirce-Vygotsky co-articulation of signs, the first phase of which was reported in 2014 in this journal (21/4, “The synergy of Peirce and Vygotsky as an analytical approach to the multimodality of semiotic mediation”). The epistemology of Peircean pragmatics emphasises the life of the mind as integral to the making of human existence – in particular, the social, perceptual and logical nature of knowledge that determines the meaning of intellectual concepts by virtue of cooperative and open-ended endeavours. In challenging the methods of tenacity, authority and apriority, a Peircean vision of scientific inquiry elicits a new discourse upon the affordance of public meaning in knowledge construction. This, in turn, provides a rationale for developing further insights into Peircean semiotics, with specific reference to the self-perpetuating function of semiosis and its implication for addressing the cross-over of diverse modes of meaning in modern-day communication and representation. Premised on the fusion of deduction and abduction as a conceptual primer, it is argued that the intertwining of icon, index and symbol within Peircean secondness can come into play in Vygotskian semiotic mediation. This brings with it a tour d’horizon for the semiotic connectivity of language, meaning and consciousness – a central tenet of cultural-historical activity theory for understanding human interactions with the world. The presentation thus offers a fresh perspective on advocating semiotic methodology gleaned from the epistemological confluence of Peirce and Vygotsky.

The VaRiSS Project: Vocabulary and Reading in Secondary School

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08 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Dr Jessie Ricketts, Royal Holloway, University of London

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Pluralism: learning to change or learning for change?

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07 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Farid Panjwani, UCL

Respondent: Jayne Barlow, Global Centre for Pluralism

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

The long term implications of devolution and localism for FE in England (Public Seminar)

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06 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Ewart Keep, Director, SKOPE

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Deputy Director, SKOPE

This lecture explores findings from a SKOPE research project (funded by the FE Trust for Leadership) on the implications of the devolution from central government to localities of certain aspects of post-19 further and adult education.

For the last 30 years English education has been subject to a process of delocalisation, centralisation and nationalisation.   Since 2010 there has been a revival of interest in devolution of power back to localities, and in education this means control over the adult skills budget for those aged 19+ and engaged in learning outside universities.  The project explored the implications of these developments, with research conducted in a number of locations, and via interviews, focus groups, conference sessions and other meetings, with further education (FE) college staff, governors, local stakeholders and national government and agencies.

The lecture will locate debates about the localisation of education within broader academic and policy discourses concerning devolution, governance and economic development.  It will explore how actors make sense of localism, and how they identify and develop strategies to support more devolved governance and funding.

The conceptual backbone of the project was the concept of 'metis' or localised, practice-based knowledge.  One of the key research questions was whether devolution allows metis to be deployed in conditions of trust between central government and localities, and between local actors and stakeholders, and the lecture will explore the considerable tensions between: rhetoric and reality concerning the scale and meaning attached to devolution by different parties; what central government was willing to contemplate and what localities aspired to; different localities’ capacity to assume new responsibilities; the levels of resources available and the potential scale of calls on these funds; and models based on systems and markets.  How these tensions and divergences will be resolved is as yet unclear.  The lecture discusses what actors can do to develop a compelling vision for localisation, and help metis to flourish.

Professor Ewart Keep holds a chair in Education, Training and Skills at the Department of Education, Oxford University.  He is the director of the Centre on Skills, Knowledge & Organisational Performance (SKOPE).  Before coming to Oxford, he worked for 21 years in Warwick Business School, and then at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University.

He has researched and written on apprenticeships, personnel management in schools and HE, HE policy more generally, the relationship between skills and economic performance, managerial attitudes towards investing in skills, the youth labour market, adult and lifelong learning, and skills policy across the four UK nations.

He has served on major committees of the SFC, HEFCE and HEFCW, as well as advising HM Treasury, DBIS, DfEE, the Scottish, Welsh, New South Wales, Queensland and New Zealand governments, the NAO, the OECD, and various professional bodies and think tanks.  He was one of the directorate of the Nuffield 14-19 project.  He is currently acting as an advisor to a Government Office for Science (Foresight) project on adult learning and the changing labour market.

Are parent training courses still effective after the trial ends?

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06 February 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Vaso Totsika, CEDAR, University of Warwick.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Evidence has shown that training parents to manage their children’s behaviour reduces behaviour problems, increases parents’ mental well-being and improves parenting. Research has shown that gains from reductions in behaviour problems translate into actual societal cost savings by reduced criminality and improved employment and life chances in adulthood. Parent training programmes are a significant tool in achieving these outcomes. But does parent training work equally well when available as part of regular service provision? We do not yet know. We will address this question by comparing the effectiveness of parent training between researcher-led evaluation and service-led implementation.  Using a combination of research evaluation data and service monitoring data from over 9,000 parents, we will examine whether the effectiveness of evidence-based parenting programmes differs between the trial phase and the sustained implementation phase.

What can school contexts teach us about researcher roles with children?

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02 February 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Marc Sarazin, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

Researchers have adopted many roles and approaches when researching children, from being fully detached (adult) observers to fully participating in child-like roles. Many of these approaches, including Mandell’s (1998) least-adult role, focus on reducing power differentials between children and adults. They oppose the researcher to teachers and parents, two different sets of adults united in their authority over children. However, opposing the researcher to these adults draws attention away from the other adults which participate in children’s lives. Furthermore, focusing on what researchers are not gives little indication as to what they are, leaving many researchers and their research participants confused as to researchers’ exact roles.

In this talk I suggest that a closer look at children’s existing interactions in school settings can provide guidance on ecologically valid roles that researchers can adopt. To do this, I draw on fieldnotes from the ethnographic arm of my doctoral study in two French primary schools for disadvantaged students. I introduce the notion of the “third adult” – an adult that is neither a parent nor a teacher or any other figure of authority, yet which still holds a place in children’s lives. I note that in fact many such adults can exist in school settings, and describe how benchmarking my own behaviour on that of “third adults” in my study schools helped me solve my own role dilemmas. I also show how children’s relations with authority-holding adults can be nonreciprocal, especially when compared to relations between children. Crucially, I argue that this lack of reciprocity can be a key component of adult authority over children. In so doing, I suggest that thinking of relations as being reciprocal or nonreciprocal provides a clear framework for minimising power differentials between children and researchers. I support this with analyses of reciprocal interactions that I had with children in my study which were particularly successful in helping me build a rapport with them.

Early literacy development in Asian writing systems

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01 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Dr Sonali Nag, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Heroic ideals: holding tech space for learning

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01 February 2017 17:00 - 18:15
Seminar Room E

Speaker: Dr George Roberts, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr James Robson, Learning and New Technologies Research Group

What does it mean to “hold a safe space for learning” in the technologically mediated environments of higher education? I suggest in this seminar that the problem of holding space for learning through technology is generalisable to higher education and needs to be taken into account in any learning journey, or plan or curriculum: particularly those that assert the learner or world is or will be transformed by the endeavour in or through learning spaces. I address this question from two directions, dialogue-centred teaching in online spaces and narrative theories of learning.

To download more information click here.

View Dr Roberts’ profile here

Tools: the television as a stimulus to distributed meaning-making

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31 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr David Johnson, Department of Education

Respondent: Aric Noboa, Discovery Learning Alliance

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Imagining a future after schooling: young people navigating uncertainty in contemporary Britain (Public Seminar)

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30 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Professor Graham Butt and Dr Patrick Alexander, School of Education, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Director of the Department of Education

This paper explores the emerging findings of the Urban-Rural Youth Transitions Project, an 18-month ethnographic inquiry into how young people imagine and experience life immediately after finishing secondary education.  The project seeks to interrogate the temporal and spatial dimensions of how young people interpret ‘the future’ as a context for imagining and enacting social identity. Here we focus in on the theme of uncertainty as an important but complex quality of the imagined futures of young people transitioning into early adulthood in 2016, under the looming shadow of recent political, social, and economic upheaval. The project entails participant observation and interviews with young people in their final year of schooling in Oxfordshire and London, looking forward to the future, as well as with individuals that we have followed from their final months in school through to their first months in Higher Education, employment, both, or neither. A third and final cohort includes young people whose stories we join in their first term at university as they make sense of new lives and new futures in London.  As their imaginings of life after school are reconciled with the rapidly shifting realities of life in early adulthood, these diverse groups of young people navigate uncertainty with a complex mix of enthusiasm, ambivalence, and profound anxiety. Drawing on theoretical perspectives of ‘the future’ and youth transitions from across the social sciences, we argue that the resulting multiplicity of future imagined selves suggests new directions for research into the spatial and temporal figuring of youth and social identity.

Dr. Patrick Alexander (Principal Investigator) is a social anthropologist specialising in education, childhood and youth studies. He is Director of the Centre for Educational Consultancy and Development (CECD) and a Senior Lecturer in Education (Anthropology and Sociology) University. In 2014 Patrick was awarded a Fulbright Peabody Scholarship to conduct research as a Visiting Scholar at New York University. This project comprises a two year comparative ethnographic study exploring aspiration and imagined futures in urban public/state schools in NYC and London. Find out more at the project blog.

Prof. Graham Butt  is a Professor in Education, Co Director of Research and Co Post Graduate Research Tutor at the School of Education, Oxford Brookes University. He is a founding member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo). Graham’s research is predominantly in the field of geography education, although he has also published on assessment, teacher workload, and modernisation of the teaching workforce. Graham is a long established member of the Geographical Association and an invited member of the UK Committee of the International Geographical Union (IGU).

Using pairwise comparisons and calibrated exemplars in the assessment of student writing

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30 January 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Joshua McGrane, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Standardised assessment programs have increasingly moved toward the inclusion of extended written performances, amplifying the need for reliable, valid and efficient methods for writing assessment. This presentation will overview a two-stage method using calibrated exemplars, based on the original work of Thurstone, as a viable alternative or complement to existing methods of writing assessment.  Written performances were taken from two years of Australia’s standardised assessment program, which included both narrative and persuasive performances from students aged 8 to 15. Overall, the findings support the viability of the method in writing assessment, demonstrating good levels of reliability and validity, and encourage the method’s broader application to performance assessments in a range of learning areas.

Teacher Education and Professional Learning Reading Group

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26 January 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Reading:

Johnson, M. (2016) Feedback effectiveness in professional learning contexts Review of Education Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 195–229 DOI: 10.1002/rev3.3061 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rev3.3061/abstract

Panel discussion: interviews - understandings from the field

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26 January 2017 12:45 - 13:55
Seminar Room B

Panel members Laura Brace, Nicole Dingwall  and Emma Abotsi, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

“The best laid schemes o' mice an' men / Gang aft agley”. In this panel discussion three current DPhil students will talk about lessons they learned while conducting interviews in the field, problems that arose, and reflect on how they dealt with them. Each panel member will talk for about ten minutes, as a stimulus for a more wide-ranging discussion with the whole audience on the potentials and pitfalls, dilemmas and debates of interviewing as you take your questions from paper to field.

Challenges of collaborative learning in higher education and professional practise

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25 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Anton Havnes, Visiting Research Fellow from Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

There has been an increasing interest in learning inherent in peer-interaction in schools, higher education and work practise. This interest contrasts what probably has been (and still is) the dominant depiction of learning: a process situated in a teacher–learner relationship with a predefined content to be learned. Instead of the vertical direction of the teacher–learning interaction, peer learning can be characterised as learning in ‘horizontal’ interactions. Yet, for learning to take place there needs to be some disparities - also among peers. Research has painted a picture of learning through peer interaction a powerful mode of learning, but also as potentially waste of time. Peer interaction is not synonymous with peer learning. There is research that direct the attention to some aspects of peer interaction that potentially promote peer learning.

This talk will address some of the challenges that have emerged from a series of research projects where learning among peers have been a focus, or it has emerged as a focus through the analysis. It will address learning in higher education and professional practice, but will also draw on insights from research on the relationship between peer interaction in school settings.

From teacher regulation to self-regulation: a multilevel meta-analysis and multilevel structural equation modeling analysis of Tools of the Mind's curricular effects

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25 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Alex Baron, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

The aim of this study is to analyse the ‘Tools of the Mind’ preschool curriculum, which emphasizes cultivation of students’ self-regulation as its paramount aim. Since its development in 1993, ‘Tools’ has spread to schools in the United States, Canada, and South America.  In the face of Tools’ proliferation, two questions emerge:  does 'Tools' significantly improve children’s self-regulation skills?  And, if so, then which of its effective elements could be applied across various educational contexts?

This presentation contains two studies.  In the first, I will systematically review extant research on ‘Tools’ and then execute a multilevel meta-analysis of the quantitative results.  Study one serves three purposes:  (1) to assess the quality of the existing Tools evidence base, (2) to estimate an aggregate curricular effect, and (3) to determine how that effect varies across contexts and student characteristics.

Whereas study one indicates whether 'Tools' at the curricular level improves students’ self-regulation, the second study will involve more granular analyses of the discrete learning activities that collectively comprise 'Tools'.  Specifically, study two will analyse child-level self-regulation and teacher-level 'Tools' implementation data for 1145 preschool children in 80 classrooms across six American school districts.  I will employ multilevel structural equation models to assess which 'Tools' activities are associated with self-regulation growth, which are associated with decline, and which exhibit no association at all.

Systems: systems of learning or learning systems?

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24 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Andrew Cunningham, Aga Khan Foundation.

Respondent: Michelle Holmes, The Partnership to Strengthen Innovation and Practice in Secondary Education (PSIPSE)

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Within and cross-language contributions of morphological awareness to vocabulary: a cross-sectional study comparing English native speakers to pupils with English as an Additional Language (EAL) in different language learning contexts

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24 January 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speakers: Adam Unthiah, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

This study explores the within and cross-language contributions of English and French morphological awareness to vocabulary in English and French in the MFL classroom, for both English native speakers and pupils with English as an Additional Language (EAL). Morphological awareness has been shown to make within-language contributions to vocabulary knowledge in the native language, and both within and cross-language contributions to vocabulary knowledge in an additional language, by helping pupils to discover the meanings of unknown derived words via the analysis of component morphemes. However, these relationships have yet to be established in a taught foreign language. To investigate these relationships in the modern foreign language (MFL) context, this study adopted a cross-sectional 2x2 between-subjects factorial design with between-participant factors of language status (EL1 vs EAL) and year group (year 8 vs year 10). The results of this study demonstrate within-language contributions of morphological awareness to French receptive vocabulary for year 10 EAL pupils, cross-language contributions of English morphological awareness to French receptive vocabulary for year 10 EAL pupils, and cross-language contributions of French morphological awareness to English receptive vocabulary for year 10 EAL pupils. In addition, within-language associations for French varied significantly as a function of language status for year 10 pupils, as did cross-language associations between French morphological awareness and English receptive vocabulary. For EAL pupils with higher levels of morphological awareness, these results indicate the importance of morphological awareness in predicting vocabulary knowledge in the MFL classroom. It is hoped that such information will aid educational practitioners with the teaching of a modern foreign language in classrooms in England which are often comprised of pupils from diverse language backgrounds.

Stuck: Britain’s social mobility problem (Public Seminar)

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23 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Lee Elliot Major, Chief Executive, The Sutton Trust

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

The Sutton Trust’s Chief Executive, Dr Lee Elliot Major, will argue that Britain has failed to address its problem of low social mobility, drawing on a range of international evidence.

This ‘stickiness’ is particularly persistent at both the top and bottom of society: the privately educated continue to dominate the leading professions and the proportion of children leaving school without basic numeracy and literacy skills remains stubbornly high. Education has largely failed to be the great social leveller; and widening inequality has limited social mobility. Failure to tackle immobility in modern Britain will not only cost the country economically, but lead to ever deeper divisions in society.

Dr Lee Elliot Major is Chief Executive of the Sutton Trust, the UK's leading foundation improving social mobility through education. The Trust improves educational opportunities for thousands of non-privileged young people each year and influences Government policy through its research and advocacy work.

He is a founding trustee of the Education Endowment Foundation, and chairs its evaluation advisory board. Lee commissioned and co-authored the Sutton Trust-EEF toolkit summarising evidence on what works to improve school attainment for disadvantaged pupils, a resource that has been used by thousands of schools and replicated in countries across the world.

He is an adviser to the Office for Fair Access. He was previously an education journalist, working for the Guardian and Times Higher Education Supplement. He regularly appears in the national press commenting on education issues and is currently writing a book on Britain’s social mobility problem. He was the first in his family to attend a university.

Using generalizability theory in educational effectiveness research

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23 January 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Charalambos Charalambous, University of Cyprus.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Recent years have seen an increasing use of classroom observations for teacher summative and formative evaluation. However, a number of questions need to be addressed to ensure the reliability of the information yielded from such observations. One of the key questions that scholars and policymakers working with teacher evaluation face is the number of lessons that need to be observed per teacher and the number of observers that need to code these lessons to ensure that the information yielded from such observations provide an acceptably reliable delineation of instructional quality in each teacher’s lessons. In this presentation, we draw on Generalizability (G-) theory to explore such issues. After an introduction of the fundamentals of G-theory and its mechanics, applications from two different subject matters will be presented. Both applications showcase how G-theory and its associated Design (D-) Studies can help us make more educative decisions when it comes to examining issues of instructional quality. We will conclude by outlining other possibilities of using G-theory to address broader questions in educational effectiveness research. 

EasyPeasy parenting app: findings from an efficacy trial on parent engagement and school readiness skills

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18 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Jen Lexmond, Character Counts and Professor Kathy Sylva, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, FELL

Re-examining the meaning of learning in an uncertain world

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17 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speakers: Caroline Arnold, Aga Khan Foundation and Dr David Johnson, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Socio-economic inequalities in education achievement and student outcomes (Public Seminar)

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16 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Anna Vignoles, Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge

Convener: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Whilst much attention has been paid to the socio-economic gap in higher education participation, far less research has investigated the extent to which graduate earnings vary by their socio-economic background. In this research, we present results from an analysis that  uses large scale administrative data from both the education and the tax systems to document the trajectories taken by different pupils through the school system into HE and beyond into the labour market. We then measure how the earnings of English graduates around 10 years into the labour market vary with the socioeconomic background of the graduate. Based on a simple measure of parental income, we see that graduates from higher income families (from the top fifth of the income distribution of those enrolled in university) have median earnings which are around 25% more than those from lower income families. This partly reflects the different subject and institution choices of students from different socio-economic backgrounds. Once we control for institution attended and subject chosen, this premium falls to around 10%. We discuss the interpretation of these findings for policy on fair access to universities whose graduates tend to have higher earnings.

Anna Vignoles is Professor of Education and Director of Research at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge and a trustee of the Nuffield Foundation. Anna has extensive experience of using large scale administrative data to study factors relating to pupil achievement and students’ outcomes from education. She has published widely on widening participation into higher education and on the socio-economic gap in pupil achievement. Her research interests include issues pertaining to equity in education, school choice, school efficiency and finance, higher education and the economic value of schooling. Anna has advised numerous government departments, including the Department for Education, the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills and HM Treasury.

Person-based statistical analyses: what are they, and what can they do for me?

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16 January 2017 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr James Hall, Department of Education, University of Exeter.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr. Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

We live in the Age of Big Data. Today’s educational researcher has greater access to larger bases, more powerful computers, and more advanced statistical software than ever before. However, this combination strains the utility of common multivariate statistical techniques. Although we have the ability to run statistical analyses on larger datasets that consider more variables than ever before, the stories suggested by our data risk being lost. This presentation introduces an alternative family of techniques (person-based statistical analyses), and gives examples that demonstrate their utility to today’s educational researcher. These examples focus on cluster analyses, latent class analyses, the measurement of disadvantage, and longitudinal trajectories.

PISA Seminar 2016

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09 December 2016 -

2015-16 Bath interns presentations

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07 December 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Irem Alici, Paige Crabb, Kate Mee, Grace Murkett and Emily Turner, Department of Psychology, University of Bath.

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group (FELL).

Conducting qualitative research in schools as a non-educationalist

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01 December 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker Dr Jane Bryson, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand 

Convener Dr Susan James Relly Qualitative Methods Hub

I have conducted research interviews with a range of time-pressured occupations: teachers, doctors, nurses, factory workers, policy analysts, senior managers. We will discuss the challenges of getting in the door to interview these people, and of meeting your interview objectives in a constrained time frame. In particular I will draw on my current research project looking at schools as workplaces - as this is ongoing and still challenging me!

Transitions between home and school mathematical practices

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30 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Guida de Abreu  Department of Psychology, Social Work and Public Health, Oxford Brookes University

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

RCT evaluation of Singapore Maths for primary schools

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30 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Pam Sammons and Ariel Lindorff, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group (FELL).

Government control of schools and curriculum: philosophical issues arising

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29 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Emeritus Professor Richard Pring, Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Education 

Convener: Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

This paper will partly arise from the conference marking the 40th anniversary of Prime Minister Callaghan’s Ruskin College speech, details of which are at http://www.soss.org.uk/category/ruskin-callaghan-speech-40-years-on/, and will cover such matters as: the right of Government to decide what should be taught in schools; the right of particular groups (e.g. Faith Groups) to have their own schools within the State system; the demise of local responsibility and accountability; redressing inequalities in provision.

Schools as workplaces: What makes a school a good place to work? (Public Seminar)

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28 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker Professor Jane Bryson, School of Management, Victoria University of Wellington

Convener Dr Susan James Relly, SKOPE

Abstract

Arguably schools are a uniquely challenging type of organisation to manage, particularly in contemporary times. Schools are at the centre of societal change shaping the skills, expectations and mores of the next generation. The work of teachers is important and meaningful but has become increasingly stressful as they face massive occupational change combined with increasing levels of individual accountability to multiple stakeholders and questionable valuing of their work. Consequently, the management of schools as workplaces presents difficult challenges due not only to the pressures their teachers face but also because of a range of educational governance and labour market issues. Thus it is surprising that schools (and the teaching occupation) rarely feature in the human resource management (HRM) literature.

This seminar will report ongoing research (New Zealand based) into what makes a school a good place to work and in particular the challenges of HRM in schools.

About the speaker

Jane researches the range of factors (institutional, organisational and individual) which influence human capability at work. Most recently she has examined the impact of employment law on workplace management practices. Her current research investigates schools as workplaces.  She is the author with Rose Ryan of Human Resource Management in the Workplace published by Pearson, 2012, and editor of Beyond Skill published by Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Jane has been an Associate Fellow of SKOPE since 2006.

What happens when econometrics and psychometrics collide? An example from the PISA data

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28 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker Dr John Jerrim, UCL Institute of Education

Conveners  Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Large-scale international assessments such as PISA are increasingly being used to benchmark the academic performance of students across the world. Yet many of the technicalities underpinning these datasets remain poorly understood by applied researchers, who often fail to take into account the complex survey and test design in their analysis. The aim of this paper is to generate a better understanding about how such databases are generated, and what this implies for empirical methodologies that should and should not be applied. In doing so, we explain how some of the statistical modelling strategies preferred by economists (such as the use of ‘fixed effects’) is at odds with the psychometric test design. In doing so, we hope to generate a better understanding of large-scale international education datasets, and promote better practice in their use.

How do PhD examiners make judgements? A study of the PhD examination in three parts

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24 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker Gill Clarke, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

In this session we will explore the phenomenon of the PhD examination from three perspectives, first considering the assessment process and how it differs from other forms of assessment in UK higher education. The role of the thesis, the purposes of the viva and the relationship between them are key questions. Next, we will consider the attributes sought by examiners in the thesis and in the candidate, focusing on research-specific and other qualities. Lastly, we will discuss the possible outcomes of the examination and their relevance to other assessment outcomes and to graduate careers.

Using the CLASS observational rating scale in five European countries: is there consensus on quality and its predictors?

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23 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens, Department of Education

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group (FELL).

Managing higher education in Germany: the law, accreditation, evaluation and quality assurance

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23 November 2016 14:00 - 15:30
Seminar Room B

Speaker Dr Susan Harris-Huemmert, German University of Administrative Sciences Speyer

Convener Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education Research Group

HEIs today are held accountable for their management and the expenditure of state-provided resources. In this context Germany’s federally organized higher education system has many masters, including for example the Standing Conference of the Ministers of Education and Cultural Affairs of the Länder in the Republic of Germany (KMK) or the Accreditation Council (Akkreditierungsrat). Susan Harris-Huemmert (DPhil alumna 2009 and Visiting Research Fellow from the German University of Administrative Sciences Speyer) will describe the interplay between the main stakeholders in German HE, reflecting on how quality assurance systems in HE are designed and managed to take into account these stakeholders. She will include reference to various accreditation practices such as programme accreditation and system accreditation drawing on her own experience within the German HE sector.

Psychometrics: measurement or magic, or both, or neither?

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23 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room E

Speaker: Dr Josh McGrane, Department of Education

Convener: Natalie Usher, Student Assessment Network

All are welcome and as always, lunch is provided. Please RSVP to Tine Gorgen by 5pm on Monday 21st November, giving any dietary requirements (Kristine.gorgen@education.ox.ac.uk)

This seminar will provide an idiosyncratic and somewhat provocative introduction to psychometrics, including a philosophical consideration of the general concept, a brief and accessible introduction to the Rasch Model, and a practical example of Rasch modelling in the creation of a test of phonological decoding. The seminar intends to instil an informed scepticism regarding some of the more ‘magical’ claims in the psychometric literature, whilst also demonstrating the power of psychometrics to enhance educational research. There will be plenty of time and encouragement for discussion. Josh will leave his cape at home.

Josh recently joined OUCEA as a Research Fellow, and has great expertise in psychometrics.

Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) among Muslim youth in Australia: The role of inter-theological education

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22 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Terence Lovat, University of Newcastle, Australia

Convener: Dr Liam Gearon, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

All are welcome

The paper offers a critique of current attempts at school-based ‘Muslim de-radicalization’ programs and proposes instead that curriculum intervention described as inter-theological education has unrealized potential to inform, challenge and impel dialogue and self-reflection about the theological dimension that, while denied by much Western-based scholarship, inevitably underlies at least part of radicalization motivation. It will be argued and justified that education of this sort would be aimed principally at the goals of holistic education but would also possess a potential spin-off effect of dealing better with ‘de-radicalization’ issues than is the current experience in Australian schools, most markedly government schools wherein, statistics illustrate, the major issues of Islamist radicalization abound.

Terence Lovat was appointed Professor Emeritus at the University of Newcastle, Australia in 2011, having retired from the position of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Education & Arts) and member of the Executive Committee of the University, a position held since 2001. Prior to that, he was Dean of Education for 6 years and before that Head of the Department of Education from 1992. During this lengthy term as a University administrator, Professor Lovat was also active in professional work and national associations, serving continuously from 1997-2009 on the Board of the Australian Council of Deans of Education, including as President between 2004 and 2005, and as an Executive member of the Deans of Arts Social Sciences and Humanities from 2006-2009. He also served on the Executive of the NSW Teacher Education Council for many years, including as President between 1998 and 2000. In 2004, he was appointed by the Federal Minister of Education Science and Training to the inaugural Board of the Carrick Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (later ALTC) and to the National Inquiry into the Teaching of Literacy. Professor Lovat now teaches and researches in the discipline area of Philosophy, Religion and Theology in the School of Humanities and Social Science, as well as with the University's theological partner organization, The Broken Bay Institute, Sydney. He is qualified in Theology, Ethics, Education, Philosophy and Social Anthropology, with particular expertise in matters of Islamic versus Judaeo-Christian Theology, and religion, ethics and values in their application to education. This background has led to a particular species of research in education. In the early 1990s, he was involved in the development of professional ethics, especially in medicine, and later took much of this background into educational research, applying philosophical and ethical perspectives to a range of educational issues, including curriculum, religion in education and values education.

Crossing barriers: The influence of linguistic and cultural background on [I + verb] belief constructions in expressions of opinion

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22 November 2016 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Lucy Zhao, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

How does cultural and linguistic background influence communication style? This topic is examined through the [I + verb] belief construct before the expression of an opinion. Since opinions carry inherent notions of speaker belief, these constructions may at first appear superfluous. However, [I + verb] forms may actually fulfill various pragmatic functions depending on prosodic variation. Unfortunately, there is little congruent data on universality vs. cross-linguistic variability of pragmatic-prosodic mappings (prosodic variation as a cue to pragmatic interpretation) of [I + verb] belief constructs before an opinion. Thus, a proof-of-concept perception test was first implemented, followed by a production task sought to investigate the effect of sociolinguistic background on a speaker's frequency of usage for various [I + verb] forms in expressing opinions, and how this relates to perceived speaker confidence.

Usage of various forms and functions of this construct was analyzed and compared between native Mandarin and English speakers, as well as EFL Mandarin speakers.  The proof of concept task supported hypotheses overall, suggesting the existence of a universal pragmatic-prosodic mapping for [I + verb]. In addition, while as predicted sociolinguistic background did not have a significant effect on universality of prosodic-pragmatic mapping in terms of confidence rating, it did have an observable effect on semantic interpretation of ‘speaker confidence’, thus indicating that sociolinguistic background may play a role in influencing these interpretations.

Results from the production task supported overall predictions that frequency of functional [I + verb] usage corresponded to culturally specific attitudes of each culture. Based on confidence rating calculations for each [I + verb] variation from pragmatic-prosodic mapping of the perception task, it was determined that Native US individuals were most confident in expressing self-opinions but least confident in expressing opinions of others whilst Native CHI individuals were most confident in expressing opinions of others and least confident in expressing self-opinion, with the EFL group in the US more closely mirroring the Native US group and the EFL group in China more closely mirroring the Native CHI group. Additionally, going against theories of previous research, Time immersed in a new L2 environment and L2 proficiency did not significantly influence performance.

Through investigating pragmatic-prosodic mappings of [I + verb] forms vs. functions, this study aimed to demonstrate the bi-directional link between language, thought and culture. By understanding and familiarizing oneself with the root of pragmatic differences, there is hope to better understand the cause of cross-cultural miscommunications between native and foreign speakers in conversation and to minimize any such discrepancies in pragmatic knowledge and sociocultural norms.

5 Years of the EEF: findings, challenges and future priorities (Public Seminar)

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21 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker Matthew Van Poortvliet, Grants Manager, Education Endowment Foundation

Convener Emeritus Professor Kathy Sylva, Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Education

Abstract

The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) was established in 2011 and has so far committed over £75 million to education research projects involving over 7,000 schools. It is perhaps best known for the Teaching and Learning Toolkit, a synthesis of research used by two thirds of schools in England, and for the use of RCTs in education. As EEF passes its 5th anniversary, and the publication of over 60 trial evaluations, this presentation will discuss findings from that research and lessons learnt to date. It will first highlight emerging areas of promise and some examples of projects that have been more and less effective. It will then discuss the challenges of translating these findings into practice, and how approaches can be taken to scale. Finally, it will look at priorities for EEF’s work in the future, including the challenges of conducting trials in new areas.

About the speaker

Matthew van Poortvliet, is responsible for commissioning and designing EEF research trials. He currently manages 30 trials across a range of education areas, and leads EEF’s work on early years, social and emotional skills, and parental engagement. Prior to joining EEF in February 2013, he worked for charity sector think tank and consultancy, New Philanthropy Capital, leading research on children and young people. He previously worked as an English language teacher and studied at Oxford University and LSE.

The role of schools in explaining individuals’ subject choices at age 14

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21 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker Dr Jake Anders, UCL Institute of Education

Conveners  Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Young people's subject choices at age 14 may have important consequences for future academic and labour market outcomes. However, the choices that individuals face are shaped by the schools in which they find themselves at this point in time. This paper explores the important question of the extent to which individuals' decisions are affected by the school they attend and to what extent this changes when we also consider the composition of schools in terms of academic attainment and socioeconomic background. This is achieved using multi-level variance decomposition models applied to administrative data on the subjects that young people study between ages 14 and 16. We highlight the important role that schools seem to play in many subject choice decisions, but also how school's actions are, in turn, affected by their composition.

Pedagogies for Sixth Form English Literature Teaching: a Knowledge Exchange Day

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19 November 2016 10:00 -
Seminar Room A

Convener Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education.

This day is a chance to bring together teachers of sixth form literature with researchers in Education and English departments in universities. There are two points to the day: disseminating current research in sixth form literary pedagogy, and engaging in dialogue between teachers and researchers to see what YOU want to be researched in this area - what needs to be done, and what would help.

English education research, particularly pedagogical research, concentrates heavily on the teaching of younger pupils; this day will bring together in dialogue those who research and would benefit from research in post-16 pedagogical literature research. It's a time of change - the new A levels and the change of the school leaving age both bring challenges for the sixth form English teacher. Great leaps forward have been made in bringing education research to teachers, but subject specific research is arguably of more relevance at A level.

The day will have presentations of research on post 16 English Literature teaching, followed by discussion, interspersed with sessions of small group discussions chaired by English Teachers from within the Oxford Education Deanery schools, followed by plenary discussion.

We aim to:

  • discuss the match/mismatch between practitioner needs regarding teaching methods for post 16 English and what needs researching
  • provide a forum for practitioners and researcher to set an agenda for future research
  • establish channels for sustained Knowledge Exchange between English academics, English Education academics, and post-16 teachers
  • form a network of researchers and practitioners interested in the teaching of English Literature 16-18

The day is free, and lunch and coffee will be provided. Registration is essential however. Please contact velda.elliott@education.ox.ac.uk Preference will be given to teachers in Oxfordshire in the first instance.

This day is being co-hosted by the Forum for English Drama and Media, and the Oxford Education Deanery. It is funded by the ESRC IAA Knowledge Exchange fund at the University of Oxford.

Devolution and localisation of the adult education budget in England

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17 November 2016 16:30 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker and Convener: Professor Ewart Keep, Director, SKOPE

In this seminar, Ewart Keep will report the findings from a year-long research project undertaken by SKOPE and the Association of Colleges (AoC) and funded by the Further Education Trust for Leadership (FETL).  The project explored the implications for leadership and management in the FE sector of the UK government’s decision to devolve what is currently the English national Adult Skills Budget (ASB) from Skills Funding Agency control to that of combined authorities and Local Economic Partnerships (LEPs).  This money currently funds post-19 FE, including English as a second language (ESOL), adult literacy and numeracy provision (ALN), statutory adult learning entitlements to first level 2 and 3 courses, as well as community learning and a range of other activities.

The research sought to address a range of issues, including:

  • How does a localised system for funding some elements of post-19 provision fit in with wider policy developments that are heading towards nationally designed and regulated markets for provision (whether funded by central government, or through student loans); and a nationally designed, high-stakes inspection regime?
  • What form will this new local control take and to what ends might it be directed? What new forms of adult education might result, and which current streams of provision might be at risk?
  • Where does it fit within wider policy debates about devolution of economic and social policy in England (e.g. the Northern Powerhouse)?
  • Is the devolution of the AEB an attempt to revitalise local funding and control of education in England? What implications does it have for re-building the capacity of local bodies to manage educational provision?
  • What are the implications for institutional leadership, management and governance that will flow from newly emerging local accountability arrangements?
  • Where is devolution heading, and what threats and opportunities does it bring with it?

The seminar will explore these issues and make some suggestions about where the devolution policy agenda may be heading over the next few years.

Knowledge traditions in the study of education; an international exploration

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17 November 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: John Furlong and Geoff Whitty

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

In this talk we draw on evidence from a number of different jurisdictions in order to clarify the range of intellectual traditions and practices that collectively constitue the field of Education today. Specifically we ask what we can learn about the current construction of the field by looking comparatively at ‘the Education project’ in different 7 different jurisdictions -  England, France, Germany, Latvia, Australia, China and the USA.  What are the similarities and differences in the ways in which knowledge in the field is traditionally constructed and the ways in which it is currently contested and is changing?   Asking questions about knowledge in Education is important because whatever the ‘settlements’ of the past, they are increasingly being called into question around the world.  As university and school systems become drawn more and more into a world of competitive international performativity, then it raises, in ever sharper terms, questions about the value of the study of Education.

Are we there yet? Oxford University Press Pathways to School Improvement

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17 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker Susila Davis, Department of Education

Convener Dr Velda Elliott Qualitative Methods Hub

This study investigates teachers’ use of online technology for school improvement and professional development purposes. It uses a design-based research framework to examine how an online platform for school improvement is being constructed, adapted and used by different practitioners in primary settings. Different forms of ‘mediated’ autonomy’ and distributed leadership were observed, along with varied interpretations of the word ‘use’ among the schools and leadership teams

An insider's view of public examinations: how GCSEs and A levels in England are set, marked, and graded: and how this will all change from 2017 onwards

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17 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room C

Speaker: Alex Scharaschkin, Director of the Centre For Education Research and Practice, AQA

Convener: Natalie Usher, Student Assessment Network

An abstract is given below. All are welcome and lunch is provided. Please RSVP by 5pm on Tuesday 15th November to Kristine Gorgen, giving any dietary requirements (Kristine.gorgen@education.ox.ac.uk)

Alex will introduce some key facts and figures about the exam system; the main players and the reforms introduced under Michael Gove that are now playing out (e.g. new specifications, abolishing modular examinations, new grading for GCSEs). He will then give an overview of how GSCE and A-level specifications are developed and accredited, how papers and mark schemes are developed; how standardisation and (e-)marking functions, and how grade boundaries are determined. He’ll also explain what happens after results days. Finally, there will be plenty of time for questions and discussion about issues of interest.

Student Assessment Network is a group run by OUCEA students, and we run several seminars each term with guest speakers. Later in the year, we also run student presentation sessions, and there’s a writing group, currently for advanced doctoral students. If you’d like to join our mailing list, please email the chair, Natalie Usher: natalie.usher@education.ox.ac.uk

Supporting parents in reading at home with their children in Year 1: the SPOKES trial

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16 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Kathy Sylva and Fiona Jelley, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group (FELL).

SEMINAR CANCELLED Religious education and religious diversity

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15 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30

Speaker: Dr Mark Halstead, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies

Convener: Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

My paper explores a key problem in the relationship between religious diversity and religious education. It was the desire to show respect for the diversity of faiths in Britain more than anything else that underpinned the adoption of a World Religions approach to RE in all non-denominational schools. But what are the theological and practical implications of this move? The RE teacher must adopt a neutral position between different religions (and between belief and non-belief), and children are likely to pick up that all major world religions are simply different routes to the same spiritual goal, and therefore in a sense all equally true. The effect of this is that where children have been brought up to accept the exclusive claims to truth of their own faith, they are now being required by the school to accept a different framework of belief, namely that their own faith is no more and no less true that any other religion. Parents whose children are in this situation are unlikely to feel that their faith is being respected (which was the reason for the introduction of the World Faiths approach to RE in the first place).

Three ways forward are discussed: (i) abandoning RE altogether; (ii) insisting on a pluralist approach to RE and dismissing religious exclusivity as unethical; (iii) encouraging a frank and open discussion of differences between faiths within RE rather than brushing them under the carpet and trying to create an artificial unity.

The paper draws significantly on a volume published by Bloomsbury last year: Religious Education: educating for diversity, by Philip Barnes and Andrew Davis, edited by Mark Halstead.

Mark Halstead is Emeritus Professor of Education at the University of Huddersfield, and Azman Hashim Fellow and Co-ordinator of the Muslims in Britain project at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Epistemic fluency in higher education: bridging actionable knowledgeable and knowledgeable action

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15 November 2016 16:30 -
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Lina Markauskaite, Associate Professor,  Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation, University of Sydney

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, OSAT

What does it take to be a productive member of a multidisciplinary team working on a complex problem? How do people get better at these things? How can researchers get deeper insight in these valued capacities; and how can teachers help students develop them? Working on real-world professional problems usually requires the combination of different kinds of specialised and context-dependent knowledge, as well as different ways of knowing. People who are flexible and adept with respect to different ways of knowing about the world can be said to possess epistemic fluency.

Drawing upon and extending the notion of epistemic fluency, in this research seminar, I will present some key ideas that we developed studying how university teachers teach and students learn complex professional knowledge and skills. Our account combines grounded and enacted cognition with sociocultural and material perspectives of human knowing and focus on capacities that underpin knowledgeable action and innovative professional work.  In this seminar, I will discuss critical roles of grounded conceptual knowledge, ability to embrace professional materially-grounded ways of knowing and students’ capacities to construct their epistemic environments.

Lina Markauskaite is an associate professor at the University of Sydney and the deputy director of the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI). Her primary research area is concerned with understanding the nature of capabilities involved in complex (inter-)professional knowledge work and learning. Her work combines grounded, enacted cognition and socio-material views of knowledge and knowing and look at professional learning from, so called, “epistemic fluency” perspective. This theoretical account is elaborated in the co-authored book “Epistemic fluency and professional education: innovation, knowledgeable action and actionable knowledge (2016, Springer, co-authored with Peter Goodyear). Lina’s second research area is emerging interdisciplinary research methods. Her main work includes the coedited book “Methodological Choice and Design: Scholarship, Policy and Practice in Social and Educational Research(2011, Springer, coedited with Peter Freebody and Jude Irwin) and the special issue of the British Journal of Educational Technology “e-Research for Education: Applied, Methodological and Critical Perspectives (2014, coedited with Peter Reimann).

Lesson study structured by a discursive resource: benefits and constraints

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15 November 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker Professor Jill Adler, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa 

Convener Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Linked research and development forms the central pillar of the Wits Maths Connect Secondary Project (WMCS), a project working with secondary mathematics teachers in several districts in one province in South Africa. An element of our professional development work is an adapted version of Lesson Study where collaborative teams of teachers and project researchers plan, reflect, replan and reteach a lesson, the focus of which is identified by teachers. A framework for describing and studying mathematics teaching that has been developed through the R & D in the project, intentionally named Mathematics Discourse in Instruction (MDI)(Adler & Ronda, 2015, 2017), structures planning and reflection in our lesson study work. In this seminar, I will describe a lesson study cycle, and reflect on MDI as a discursive resource in this context of professional development practice. While mathematics forms the subject context of this presentation, I will foreground the more general application of resource structured lesson study, and its possibilities and constraints for mutual learning subject focused teaching.

References

  • Adler, J., & Ronda, E. (2015). A framework for describing Mathematics Discourse in Instruction and interpreting differences in teaching. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. doi:DOI:10.1080/10288457.2015.1089677)
  • Adler, J., & Ronda, E. (2017). Mathematical discourse  in instruction matters. In J. Adler & A. Sfard (Eds.), Research for educational change: Transforming researchers' insights into improvement in mathematics teaching and learning (pp. 64-81). Abingdon: Routledge

Jill Adler holds the SARChI Mathematics Education Chair at the University of the Witwatersrand, which focuses on research and development in secondary mathematics education. Jill has spearheaded several large-scale teacher development projects, the most recent, within the Chair ambit, begun in 2009, is called the Wits Maths Connect Secondary project. This work builds on her research on teaching in multilingual classrooms, and teacher professional development. Jill is a Visiting Professor of Mathematics Education at King’s College London, UK, and President-elect of ICMI – the International Commission of Mathematical Instruction. She is the recipient of the 2012 Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) Gold Medal for Science in the Service of Society, and the 2015 Freudenthal Award.

Mathematics Education Reading Group

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15 November 2016 15:00 -
Seminar Room C

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group Reading:

The role of decoding in second language English vocabulary acquisition

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15 November 2016 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Sha Li, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Research into the processing of second language (L2) writing systems by learners with typologically contrasting L1 writing systems has consistently underlined the importance of cross-linguistic transfer, interpretable as the automatic triggering of L1-based processing mechanisms by L2 written input. Specifically, in an alphabetic L2 (e.g. English), print-to-sound decoding- defined as the sub-lexical process of ‘assembling’ pronunciations for written words or strings, using the systematic relations between written symbols (graphemes) and sounds (phonemes)- has been found to be facilitated amongst learners with an alphabetic L1 (e.g. Korean) compared to a morphemic L1 (e.g. Chinese). This may be because the latter are accustomed to processing words as visual wholes rather than engaging in intraword analysis. Recently, the relationship between L2 decoding and word learning has begun to be explored. There is a strong theoretical support for a casual relationship between the variables: fast and accurate decoding of written forms provides reliable phonological representations which support the operation of phonological working memory; psycholinguistic evidence suggests that this, in turn, plays a central role in learning novel phonological forms. Further, knowledge of a language’s grapheme-phoneme correspondences allows the orthographic and phonological representations of new words to be mutually reinforcing. Previous studies have indeed found positive correlations between both the speed and accuracy of decoding on the one hand and success in intentional word learning on the other, amongst learners with alphabetic but not morphemic L1 backgrounds- consistent with the view that morphemic learners are more likely to process words visually as whole units. However, there has been no experimental evidence with could prove the linkage between decoding and vocabulary learning.

Against this backdrop, an experimental study was conducted in which a twelve-week systematic decoding instruction programme covering 101 English graphemes was implemented to three classes of first-year English majors in three universities in Wuhan, China. The control participants received a twelve-week English phonology instruction programme focusing on the pronunciation of 44 English graphemes and other pronunciation tips (rhythm, linking and stress patterns).

To evaluate the effectiveness of the decoding instruction programme, participants’ performance on an English decoding test and a vocabulary memorisation task followed by immediate recall and recognition tests before and after the instruction programmes were compared. The findings show that participants who followed the decoding instruction programme demonstrated a clear and significant advantage over their counterparts in the control group in terms of the number of correctly pronounced graphemes and words in an English decoding test. In a vocabulary memorisation task, the intervention participants achieved significantly higher scores in the oral recall, written recall and aural recognition test compared to the control participants, but no significant differences between the two groups were observed in the written recognition test. The results suggest that explicit decoding instruction can be effective in promoting the English decoding proficiency of Chinese university EFL learners, and for the first time establish the causal relationship between L2 decoding and vocabulary learning.

What do undergraduate students really think about money? (Public Seminar)

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14 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker Dr Neil Harrison, Department of Education, University of the West of England

Convener Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education Research Group

This seminar will synthesise the findings of four recent research projects focused on contemporary students’ opinions and behaviours around money.  The analysis spans both quantitative and qualitative approaches, across a mixture of single institution, multiple institution and international settings.  It will aim towards a coherent understanding of the ways in which students view debts, bursaries and their investment in higher education, problematising some of the dominant discourses of students and demonstrating a rich diversity of student experiences where personal and psychological factors contribute as much as socio-economic ones.  This will be contextualised against current policy developments and the accelerating marketisation of higher education.

Using secondary data to examine the transition of science graduates into highly skilled STEM jobs

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14 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker Professor Emma Smith, Department of Education, University of Leicester

Conveners  Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Concerns about shortages of highly skilled science, engineering, technology and mathematics graduates are well established and have persisted for some time. Although these claims have been challenged, they have formed the basis of policies directing considerable resources to STEM education at compulsory and post-compulsory levels. In this paper we consider a range of secondary data sources (including data from HESA, the 1970 British birth cohort study and the annual population survey) across a three decade period  to review what they can tell us about the persistence of long term and widespread shortages of highly skilled STEM graduates.

Ethnographic research with youth in a South African urban informal settlement: a reflection on research practice

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10 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker Hannah Dawson, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Convener Dr Susan James-Relly Qualitative Methods Hub

Building social relationships is integral to ethnographic research requiring trust, mutuality and importantly time, what Veenya Das has called a posture of ‘critical patience’. In this presentation I critically reflect on twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork with young people, predominantly young men, in an informal settlement on the outskirts of Johannesburg. By paying attention to the relationality of my research I critically reflect on: i) the value of using different methods to capture different perspectives; ii) the challenge of representing the complexity of people’s lives while abstracting enough to tell a coherent story; and iii) the ethical obligations and unresolved questions of representation, language and power.

Child characteristics and their evocative effects on interpersonal environments

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09 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr Gintautas Silinskas, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group (FELL).

Religion and Belief in Britain: the Commission on Religion and Belief in British Public Life (Public Seminar)

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07 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker Dr Edward Kessler, Cambridge Forum for Jewish Studies, University of Cambridge

Convener Dr Liam Gearon, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

Abstract

Religion and belief are driving forces in society today. Although there is some divergence of opinion over the extent, there is unanimity that the UK is becoming less Christian, less religious and more diverse. Dr Ed Kessler, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Belief in British Public Life, will discuss the implications of the dramatic changes in the religious landscape in less than two generations.

The Commission’s report, ‘Living with Difference’, was published in December 2016 and generated a fierce debate about UK public policy related to religion and belief. Dr Kessler will reflect on the reaction to the report as well as its impact in the areas of education, the media, law, dialogue and social action.

Understanding religion and belief is not an option but a necessity that the Government needs to factor into their approaches. The pattern of religious affiliation has changed and continues to change. Policymakers and politicians need to catch up with events, to enhance their capacity to read a most potent sign of our times - religion and belief.

About the speaker

Dr Edward Kessler MBE is Founder Director of the Woolf Institute, a Fellow of St Edmund's College, Cambridge and a leading thinker in interfaith relations, primarily, Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations. Dr Kessler was described by The Times Higher Education Supplement as 'probably the most prolific interfaith figure in British academia' and was awarded an MBE in 2011 for services to interfaith relations.

Further info at: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/people/profile.asp?ItemID=51

Tackling inequality? Teacher effects and the socioeconomic gap in educational achievement

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07 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker Rodrigo Torres, UCL Institute of Education

Conveners  Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Although teacher quality is usually signalled to be the most relevant school-level factor impacting students' learning, little is known about the relevance of teacher effects explaining educational inequality. By using a value-added model for a cohort of 10th graders, in this work we examine the socioeconomic gap in teacher effects across Chilean secondary schools, and its importance in explaining socioeconomic inequality in students' achievement in math and language. We found an important proportion of highly effective teachers in low socioeconomic status (SES) schools, but also much bigger variation in teacher effects across those schools. Variability in teacher effects decreases when moving towards higher SES schools, where there is also a smaller proportion of low-performing teachers. All in all, teacher effects have a levelling impact for students in low SES schools when compared to those in middle SES schools, but no significant impact when compared to students in high SES schools.

Collaboration for teaching and learning

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03 November 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Oxford Education Deanery

Research Champions Meeting. Ian Thompson will report on findings from the recent Deanery project examining the relationship between teachers' collaboration (with one another), the nature of their teaching and their students' literacy outcomes.

Exploratory studies with mentors and trainees in school-based ITE to identify and develop more productive orientations towards learning from experience

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03 November 2016 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room H

Speaker: Tessa Blair, DPhil student, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Title and abstract to follow but Tessa will be reporting on the first phase of her study, exploring the use of an ‘Orientations to Learning from Experience’ framework in participatory action research with mentors and trainees.

‘Ah Jennifer...but who is Jennifer?’ Trust, rapport and respect in qualitative research with young men on the move

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03 November 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker Jenny Allsop, Department of Social Policy

Convener Zainab Kabba Qualitative Methods Hub

While it is recognised that building ‘trust’ and ‘rapport’ is an essential element of qualitative research methodology, the meaning of these concepts is rarely addressed head on, even by the social constructivists who see interpersonal relationships as an important dimension of their research. Relational practices - in other words ‘the way in which we enter the worlds of those who are the focus of our research’ (Miller 2004) - is nevertheless a crucial determinant of the quality of the data that we gather alongside the ethics of our research.  This is especially true where power dynamics in the research context are complex and intersectional and where participants are politically marginalised or face discrimination. In this session I critically explore the concepts of ‘trust’ and ‘rapport’ in the context of a year of fieldwork with young refugees in Europe. I examine how trust and rapport relate to questions of physical and interpersonal access and how questions of power, politics and intimacy arose and were negotiated during my research. On their own trust and rapport are not enough, I argue, to capture the interpersonal dynamics at play. Respect, was an important third dimension which was key to fostering both an ethical and productive research relationship.

Miller, K. E. (2004). Beyond the frontstage: Trust, access, and the relational context in research with refugee communities. American journal of community psychology, 33(3-4), 217-227.

Relational expertise: what does it offer?

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02 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Anne Edwards

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

What mediates the relation between SES and science achievement?

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02 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Professor Peter Bryant and Rossana Barros, Department of Education.

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group (FELL).

To what extent is Oxford still an Anglican foundation university?

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01 November 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Revd Dr John Gay, Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

The term ‘Church university’ is normally limited in this country to the group of new universities evolving out of the teacher training colleges established by the Church of England and the Roman Catholic Church.  However four of the earliest universities, Oxford, Cambridge, Durham and King’s College London were ecclesiastical foundations. Whilst these four have broadened and secularized over the years, nevertheless there are still significant ecclesiastical elements remaining in their constitutions, their organisational structures and their practices.  This seminar focuses on Oxford as a case study.

John Gay is an honorary research fellow at the Department of Education and a visiting professor at the University of Winchester.

Becoming whole: language as whole school learning

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01 November 2016 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr. Jane Spiro, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

This paper will compare two projects designed to embed language change across the whole curriculum. Both projects track the process of bringing first languages into the school culture. The first took place at an Oxford primary school with multiple first languages (such as Turkish, Nepali, Japanese, Hindi, Italian).  It engaged parents, teachers and teaching assistants in a process of training, storytelling, and language exchange. Teachers were asked to share their perceptions of first languages and the EAL learner at the start and finish of the project, and changes in the school culture were tracked by an 'insider' researcher taking field notes of daily life in the school during a period of one year. The second project shares a process of 'dialogic' storytelling, between an insider Hawaiian educator, and myself as outsider/observer, experiencing the process of Hawaiian cultural and linguistic re-emergence. This dialogue is located within the spectrum of responses to a Hawaiian cultural renaissance, from an 'add-on' discrete subject, to complete immersion across the whole school experience and for children of all ethnicities.  The two projects track the process of changing attitude to first language/heritage, and its impact on learning for the whole school community. They also explore the impact of first language on second language development and learner self-esteem.

Motivation and engagement in mathematics and English during a month at school: Every minute of every day for every student matters - again!

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01 November 2016 12:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room E

Speaker Professor Andrew J. Martin, School of Education, University of New South Wales

Convener Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

Abstract

The research in this presentation reports on real-time longitudinal intra-individual data collected in mathematics and English lessons, every school day, across four school weeks. A total of 113 boys and girls in Year 7 from two Australian schools participated. Using mobile technology (e.g., smart phones, laptops, tablets) to capture intra-individual real-time data, a four-level model was explored, consisting of between-lesson (within-day) ratings at the first level (up to 2 lessons per day), between-day ratings at the second level (5 days per week), between-week ratings at the third level (4 weeks), and between-student ratings at the fourth level (thus, 40 possible time points per student). Multilevel modeling showed substantial between-lesson (within-day) variability in motivation and engagement (M = 34%) and substantial between-student variability (M = 62%). There was not so much variability between days (M = 2%) or between weeks (M = 2%). We propose the study offers insights for motivation and engagement theorizing (particularly around stability and developmental issues) and technological and logistic guidance for collecting real-time data. Furthermore, these findings derived from boys and girls in two schools replicate those from a previous study (also discussed in this presentation) conducted among a small sample of boys. The findings again show that every minute of every day for every student matters.

About the speaker

Andrew Martin, PhD, is Professor of Educational Psychology in the School of Education at the University of New South Wales, Australia specializing in motivation, engagement, achievement, and quantitative research methods. He is also Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford, Honorary Professor in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney, Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, and President of the International Association of Applied Psychology’s Division 5 Educational, Instructional, and School Psychology.

Does market competition and/or the growth of participation foster diversity in higher education systems? (Public Seminar)

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31 October 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker Professor Simon Marginson, IoE/UCL, Director of the ESRC/HEFCE Centre for Global Higher Education

Convener Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education Research Group

The paper returns to a long-standing issue in the literature on higher education systems, that of the relationship, if any, between diversity (horizontal differentiation based on variation in HEI mission, organisational cultures, educational practices etc), the growth of participation levels, and marketisation. The classical American literature suggested that diversity, participation and competition all tended to advance together but more recent empirical studies in the English-speaking world suggest that markets foster vertical differentiation rather than horizontal variety and encourage imitating behaviour which reduces diversity, while the growth of participation is neutral in relation to horizontal diversity. States have contrary implications for diversity: sometimes they regulate greater homogenisation, sometimes they deliberately foster variety in the form of specialist institutions or sectors. The paper surveys the world wide terrain, in which participation is rapidly advancing—in 56 countries more than 50% of the young age cohort enters higher education. It finds that the principal features of the present period, in association with growth, are  (1) the advance of the multi-purpose multi-disciplinary research multiversity as the main institutional form, (2) a secular decline in the role of non-university sectors and specialist institutions , (3) an increase in internal diversity in the large multiversities, (4) an increase in vertical stratification in many systems, (5) no increase in horizontal diversity overall and a probable decline in diversity, except for the rise of for-profit colleges in some countries.

Simon Marginson is Professor of International Higher Education at the UCL Institute of Education at University College London in the UK. He is Director of the ESRC/HEFCE Centre for Global Higher Education (CGHE), and Joint Editor-in-Chief of Higher Education. CGHE is a research partnership of three UK and eight international universities, and has £6.1 million in funding to carry out 15 projects in relation to global, national and local aspects of higher education. Simon has worked at the UCL Institute of Education since October 2013. Prior to that he was Professor of Higher Education at the University of Melbourne (2006-2013). He was the Clark Kerr Lecturer on Higher Education at the University of California, Berkeley in 2014, and in the same year received the Distinguished Research Award from the Association for Studies of Higher Education in the United States. He is a member of Academia Europaea. Simon works primarily on globalisation and higher education, international education and comparative higher education. He also researches the public good contributions of higher education, and problems of education and social inequality, and is currently completing a book with colleagues on the implications of the worldwide trend to high participation systems of higher education. His books include The Dream is Over: The crisis of Clark Kerr’s Californian idea of higher education (2016), published earlier this month by University of California Press.

Measuring graduate over-qualification

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31 October 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker Dr Craig Holmes, Pembroke College

Conveners  Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

There are long-standing concerns that many people complete more education and have more skills than is necessary given what they do in the labour market. This has been a particular issue for the recent cohorts of a greatly expanded higher education sector. However, overeducation has proven to be a difficult concept to accurately measure. This talk will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches commonly deployed - such as those that look at wages, typical qualifications and self-reports of skill utilisation. It then argues that more should be done to looks at characteristics of the job itself. One approach seeks to distinguish appropriate education levels, as in recent attempts to create graduate vs. non-graduate occupational classifications. Drawing on our own recent work, we examine what happens when a graduate holds a non-graduate job, and vice versa.

Data collection and methodology in post-Soviet authoritarian regimes

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27 October 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker Rebecca Fradkin, Department of Politics

Convener Zainab Kabba Qualitative Methods Hub

My research examines how authoritarian regimes co-opt majority religious groups as a process of nation building and how citizens respond to these efforts. Using a mixed methods research approach, I carried out fieldwork over the course of six months in Kazakhstan and Tatarstan, Russia. In this seminar I will discuss data collection and issues pertaining to restricted access in post-Soviet authoritarian regimes in order to interview both elites and ‘ordinary’ citizens. I will also discuss how the triangulation of data can aid in overcoming these obstacles.

Rebecca Fradkin is a doctoral candidate at the University of Oxford in the Department of Politics and International Relations and at Nuffield College. Rebecca previously received her MPhil in Comparative Government from Oxford and also holds bachelor degrees in Political Science, Comparative Religion, and Russian, Eurasian and Eastern European Studies. She has worked in the public sector and her academic interests include religion and politics, nation building, and authoritarian regimes.

OSAT reading group

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26 October 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

Reading:

Education in divided societies: the role of school collaboration (Public Seminar)

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24 October 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker Professor Tony Gallagher, University of Belfast

Convener Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

Abstract

Mass education has traditionally been used as an integrating force, perhaps most notably in the role of the public school in the United States. In the latter part of the 20th century overt assimilation through education was increasingly critiqued and attention shifted towards the incorporation of various forms of multiculturalism in schools. In some societies separate schools operated in recognition of different identities: in some contexts separate schools were used to maintain patterns of domination-oppression, but in others it was an attempt to allow minorities to maintain their own identities. Northern Ireland has operated separate schools for over a century, and many pointed to this as a factor in social division and political violence: various interventions were applied during the years of the violence, but few showed evidence of creating positive systemic change. For the last decade a new approach, based on promoting collaborative networks of Protestant and Catholic schools, has been put in place. ‘Shared education’ seeks to create dialogic processes between communities, at all levels, by using network effects to change the nature of the relationship between schools and communities in local areas while focusing on social, educational and economic goals. This presentation outlines the background to the development of shared education in Northern Ireland and traces how it has developed. The paper also will examine briefly how the idea has been adopted in other contexts, most notably in Israel.

About the speaker

Tony Gallagher is a Professor of Education at Queen’s University Belfast. His primary research interest lies in the role of education in divided societies. Since 2007 he has led the Sharing Education Programme (SEP) in Northern Ireland and is currently working on related projects in Israel and Los Angeles. He is editor of Education, Citizenship and Social Justice (Sage); a member of the steering committee of the International Consortium for Higher Education, Civic Responsibility and Democracy; and works for the Council of Europe on a number of activities, including higher education and citizenship education. He has held a number of leadership roles in Queen’s, including Head of the School of Education (2005-10) and Pro Vice Chancellor (2010-15). Currently he is Director of Research in the School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work.

From external regulation to self-regulation: A multilevel structural equation modelling analysis of Tools of the Mind's curricular effects

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24 October 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker Alex Baron, Department of Education

Conveners  Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

The aim of this study is to analyze the ‘Tools of the Mind’ preschool curriculum, which emphasizes cultivation of students’ self-regulation as its paramount aim. Since its development in 1993, ‘Tools’ has spread to schools in the United States, Canada, and South America.  In the face of Tools’ proliferation, two questions emerge:  does 'Tools' significantly improve children’s self-regulation skills?  And, if so, then which of its effective elements could be applied across various educational contexts? The paper contains two parts.  In the first, I will systematically review extant research on ‘Tools’ and then execute a multilevel meta-analysis of the quantitative results.  Study one serves three purposes:  (1) to assess the quality of the existing Tools evidence base, (2) to estimate an aggregate curricular effect, and (3) to determine how that effect varies across contexts and student characteristics. Whereas part one indicates whether 'Tools' at the curricular level improves students’ self-regulation, part two will involve more granular analyses of the discrete learning activities that collectively comprise 'Tools'.  Specifically, study two will analyse child-level self-regulation and teacher-level 'Tools' implementation data for 1145 preschool children in 80 classrooms across six American school districts.  I will employ multilevel structural equation models to assess which 'Tools' activities are associated with students’ self-regulation growth, which are associated with decline, and which exhibit no association at all.

The fringe benefits of failure

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20 October 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Speakers Professor Ruth Merttens, Co-Director of the Hamilton Education Trust (on secondment from the University of St. Mark and St. John, Plymouth) and Dr Naomi Norman, Independent education researcher and consultant

Convener Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Abstract

JK Rowling entitled her Harvard lecture (2008) ‘The fringe benefits of failure and the importance of imagination’, and the title of this seminar borrows the first part, but could just as well have borrowed both. During this seminar, Professor Ruth Merttens and Dr Naomi Norman will, in one sense, tell a story of failure.  In another, it is hoped you will join them in a celebration of imagination.

Hamilton Trust (an educational charity) embarked in September 2015 on a year’s research project, focussed on the question of the well accepted, if little researched, attrition of numerical fluency as pupils travel through secondary education. Hence, the Hamilton programme of numeracy sessions, was used (for 15 minutes, 3 times per week) by eight secondary schools with some of their Y7 pupils and not others. By any normal standard, the project was a failure. More or less across the board, the pupils in Action groups did not outperform those in Control groups. Furthermore, the majority of students tested from Y7 to Y12, did worse or no better on the tests than they had in Y6.

Numeracy is not just a minor issue in secondary schools, it is a massive issue. And a carefully drafted, well-trialled programme of sessions appeared to do nothing to improve things.

However, research is only a failure if it is not carried out rigorously and with complete transparency.  Enquiry is always good, as long as we engage honestly with the findings.  What is required here is imagination. We need to think what explanations are possible – even probable.  And, crucially, what can be done to change things.

This seminar presents a clear summary of the fascinating data.  Ruth and Naomi will then encourage those attending to join in imagining why things panned out as they did and how the project could be improved.

Teaching Chaucer

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20 October 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room B

Speakers Dr Jenni Nuttall, University of Oxford and Andrew Archibald, Oxford Spires Academy.

Convener Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education.

Dr Jenni Nuttall, editor of The English Review and Chaucer enthusiast will talk about Chaucer in the new A level, including why you should be doing it!  She will focus on ways into the Merchant's Tale and useful resources for teaching Chaucer in the sixth form. Andrew Archibald will act as respondent and talk about his experiences teaching the Canterbury Tales in Year 7 at Oxford Spires Academy. It should be an interesting and inspiring session for anyone who is or who wants to teach Chaucer in their school. All are welcome - just come along. We appreciate colleagues from schools may be late - don't worry, just come on in!

Mathematics Education Reading Group

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20 October 2016 15:00 -
Seminar Room H

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group Reading:

‘Oh, yeah!’ vs ‘Yeah, right!’ Predicting patient behaviour with just one word

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20 October 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker Charlotte Albury, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences

Convener Zainab Kabba Qualitative Methods Hub

Through detailed analysis of conversations between GPs and patients it can be possible to predict patient behaviours after they leave the doctor’s surgery. Data will be presented from the BWeL trial, where overweight patients were recommended a free referral to a commercial weight management programme from their GP. All patients presented here accepted their referral, however not all actually attended. Conversation analysis of the treatment recommendation stage of these encounters reveals that, from just one word, it is possible to tell if a patient will, or will not, actually attend their referral once they have accepted.

Understanding high-quality teacher-child interactions: behavioural and psychophysiological correlates and associations with child outcomes

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19 October 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Eija Pakarinen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group (FELL).

The beneficial effect of high-quality teacher-child interactions on children’s academic and socio-emotional outcomes is widely acknowledged. However, factors that may determine the quality of teacher-child interactions, such as teacher stress, different activity settings, and cultural and educational context, have been investigated to a much lesser extent. In addition, teacher gaze behaviour plays an important role in students’ classroom experiences and can reflect on teaching practices and teacher-child interactions. Behavioural and psychophysiological measures, such as eye-tracking glasses and salivary cortisol, present exciting opportunities for researchers to better understand the determinants of high-quality teacher-child interactions. This talk presents results on associations between teacher-child interactions and child outcomes in the Finnish First Steps Study. In addition, preliminary results on teacher gaze behaviour and salivary cortisol in relation to observed teacher-child interactions in three different countries (Finland, Kosovo and United Arab Emirates) will be reported.

Modeling the structure of language learning motivation

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18 October 2016 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr. Janina Iwaniec, University of Bath

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

The current study investigates the language learning motivation of Polish teenagers enrolled in compulsory education. 465 fifteen-year-olds from 10 schools located in rural and urban areas of southern Poland filled in a motivational questionnaire that aimed to measure 7 constructs from ranging from the most popular language learning goals such as instrumental orientation and international orientation, through self-guides, including ideal L2 self, self-efficacy beliefs and the English self-concept, to the scales of intrinsic motivation and self-regulation. The students also completed Quick Oxford Proficiency Test, which was mainly focused on reading skills but on the knowledge of English grammar and vocabulary.

The obtained data was analysed using SPSS and Mplus, the structural equation modeling software. The hypothesised model included the direct links between language learning goals and self-guides which, in turn, influenced the levels of intrinsic motivation and, indirectly, self-regulation. Language learning proficiency, as measured by the test, was expected to be directly affected by self-regulation and indirectly by other variables. The final model confirmed that motivation indeed influences language learning proficiency. Similarly, as hypothesised, language learning goals seem to affect self-guides, which, in turn have a decisive role in the prediction of intrinsic motivation and self-regulated behaviour.

Making use of international large-scale assessment data in national contexts: PIRLS for Teachers (Public Seminar)

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17 October 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speakers Dr Jenny Lenkeit and Dr Therese N. Hopfenbeck, Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment

Convener Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Director of the Department of Education

Abstract

There is a knowledge gap between information provided by international large-scale assessments (ILSA) such as PIRLS, PISA, and TIMSS, the publically available research results and what is of interest and use to teachers in England. Considering the public costs needed to participate in international studies, the link between this form of assessment and its impact on classroom pedagogy is alarmingly low and questions about the use of this data and related research grow more urgent. But, the understanding of how to engage the users of research is still developing and the use and impact of research on practice is as yet minimal. One reason for this is seen in excluding practitioners from research activities that concern their professional field.

The PIRLS for Teachers project (ESRC IAA funded) first engaged with teachers to increase their knowledge about PIRLS and their capacity to use data and information provided by the survey. Second, it aimed to increase researchers’ understanding of the challenges teachers face in dealing with PIRLS findings and identifying their specific needs and interests. Third, teachers and researchers acted as co-producers of relevant new knowledge by jointly interpreting the PIRLS findings, addressing new research questions and finding ways in which results can be used to improve teaching practice.

We will outline the rationale of our project, discuss the challenges for us as researchers and for the teachers, present the materials developed in collaboration with teachers and discuss the impact and dissemination strategy.

We expect the outcomes of the project to enhance not only teachers’ professional learning about PIRLS and its use for improving classroom practice but also that of researchers about practitioners’ needs for understanding and using findings provided in ILSA. We also expect teachers to wrestle with the possible contradicting evidence from their own classrooms and from PIRLS. Overall, outcomes of this research will contribute to strengthening the link between ILSA, teachers’ understanding of its findings and the improvement of classroom practices, partly through possible new research collaborations.

About the speakers

Jenny Lenkeit is a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). She has a PhD in Education and a Master’s degree in Empirical Educational Research and Comparative Education. At OUCEA, Jenny’s work relates to the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2016 National Centre in England for which OUCEA is the National Research Centre in collaboration with Pearson UK. Jenny’s research interests are moreover focused on the conceptual and methodological link between international large-scale assessments and educational effectiveness research, cross cultural comparisons.

Therese N. Hopfenbeck is an Associate Professor and is Director of the Oxford University Centre Therese’s research interests focus on how large-scale comparative assessments and international testing have shaped public policy across education systems and how knowledge from these studies can enhance better learning from students around the world. She is Research Manager of PIRLS 2016 in England and member of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2018 Questionnaire Expert Group. Therese is also Principal Investigator for the ESRC-DFID-funded project, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA): Improving Pedagogy and Assessment for Numeracy in Foundation Years. The focus of this project is to conduct research on formative assessment in primary school early years’ numeracy contexts in Tanzania, East Africa and two sites in South Africa. Therese is Lead Editor of the international research journal Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice.

How to improve early career teacher retention

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17 October 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker Dr Rebecca Allen, UCL and Director Education Datalab

Conveners  Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

Reducing early career teacher drop-out holds the promise of reducing teacher shortages and ultimately improving the quality of teaching. In this talk I will draw together data from the School Workforce Census and multiple surveys to show new evidence on trainee experiences, school placement quality and decisions to take a first post. I will make suggestions about the type of information we could routinely collect from trainees to identify who is most at risk of dropping out.

Action Research Fellowships

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13 October 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Oxford Education Deanery

Presentations of small-scale teacher enquiries by teachers in West Oxfordshire secondary schools, all with a focus on literacy development (within subject teaching and for SEND students).

An introduction to Vygotsky

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12 October 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

Enhancing narrative writing skills in primary school children/Meet me halfway: a number line intervention to improve number sense

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12 October 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Raveena Balani and Tara Paxman, former Masters students, MSc Education (Child Development and Education).

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Children Learning Research Group and Dr Maria Evangelou, Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group (FELL).

Department of Education Research Poster Conference

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10 October 2016 17:00 - 19:00
Seminar Rooms A, B, G & H

The annual opportunity for research staff and students in research groups and centres to demonstrate their current work to new students in the form of posters.

Group trajectory analysis applied to national data on educational outcomes for looked after children

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10 October 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speakers Dr Julian Gardiner & Professor Ted Melhuish, Department of Education

Conveners  Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Quantitative Methods Hub

We apply the statistical technique of group trajectory analysis to map differing patterns of trajectories for educational outcomes across Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 4 for the population of looked after children in England.

Teacher Education and Professional Learning Reading Group

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06 October 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room E

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Discussion of shared reading:

What are universities for? The 6th Annual Lecture of the Oxford Education Society

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16 September 2016 18:30 - 19:30
Seminar Room A

EMI Oxford Course for University Teachers

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14 August 2016 -

The Young Language Learners (YLL) Symposium 2016

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06 July 2016 -

Functions: the growth of understanding

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21 June 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Anne Watson, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics Education

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

This seminar draws on the work of Michal Ayalon, Steve Lerman and myself. We investigated the growth of students' understanding of functions in secondary schools in two countries whose curricula are very different. In doing so, we developed conjectures about the relationship between curriculum and how the different elements that contribute to a mature understanding of functions are coordinated. We also engaged with the extensive literature about covariation and rate of change. Our most recent iterations through the data have led to some insights about the relationships between informal, schooled and formal mathematical knowledge.

Trends in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

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16 June 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room E

Speaker: Issac Lim, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, OSAT

In this presentation, I will outline findings of my review of the empirical literature that have used CHAT to study the delivery of patient care in interprofessional settings since the 1990s. Specifically, I will speak about trends, provide a critique, as well as recommendations on what future empirical work in CHAT should focus on. Additionally, I will present a framework I developed for synthesizing the literature, which predominantly used qualitative research design approaches.

I am currently reading a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. I am also a member of the OSAT research group. Please go to this URL if you would like to know more http://www.education.ox.ac.uk/about-us/directory/issac-lim/.

The ‘writing up’ process: discussion panel

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16 June 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

The findings of an RCT evaluation of the effectiveness of the Letterbox Club in improving reading and number skills of foster children ages 7-11 years old (Public Seminar)

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13 June 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Karen Winter, Queen’s University, Belfast

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, Rees Centre for Research in Fostering and Education

The poor educational outcomes of children in care are a significant concern internationally. Whilst there have been many interventions developed to address this problem, very few of these have been rigorously evaluated. This paper presents the findings of a randomised controlled trial that sought to measure the effectiveness of a book gifting programme (the Letterbox Club) that aims to improve literacy skills amongst children aged 7–11 years in foster care. The programme involves children receiving six parcels of books sent through the post over a six-month period. The trial, which ran between April 2013 and June 2014, involved a sample of 116 children in Northern Ireland (56 randomly allocated to the intervention group and 60 to a waiting list control group). Outcome measures and findings are discussed. The accompanying qualitative process evaluation that sought to determine foster carer/child attitude towards and engagement with the parcels are also considered. In light of the combined quantitative and qualitative findings it is recommended that the logic model/theory of change underpinning book gifting schemes might benefit from being more clearly defined and that it might help if a clearer role for foster carers was delineated.

Dr. Karen Winter is a lecturer in social work at Queen’s University Belfast. Her research interests include children and young people in care; children’s rights; communication and positive relationships with children; vulnerable families. She has been involved in a number of research projects funded by local government, the ESRC and the voluntary sector. She has published extensively in her area of expertise. Karen is a Board member of the European Social Work Research Association. Outside of work she is also the Chair of the advisory group for Fostering Network Northern Ireland and a non-executive member of the Board for the Northern Ireland Guardian ad Litem Agency where she is also chair of the social care governance committee.  Prior to a career in academia Karen worked as a qualified social worker, team manager in child protection and as a Guardian Ad Litem in a career spanning over 16 years.

How the European Bologna Process is influencing students’ learning experience: findings of a study of higher education students in Denmark

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13 June 2016 14:00 - 15:30
Seminar Room C

Speaker: Dr Laura Louise Sarauw, Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Education, DPU, Aarhus University, Denmark

Convener: Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Policies that aim to speed up students’ pace of learning and make them employable in a future labour market play an increasingly important role in the planning of European higher education. This presentation argues that some of the main features of the European Bologna process, namely the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS), modularisation and a shift towards a competence-based curriculum, are far from being a neutral means to enhance student mobility across countries and study programmes that they were originally presented to be. Drawing on a recent large scale study of students’ responses to Bologna-related reforms of the Danish university legislation, the presentation demonstrates how these features are assembled in ways in which students are increasingly incentivised to adopt a certain kind of anticipatory behaviour, redirecting their attention from learning activities ‘here and now’ towards processes of piecing together and forecasting a particular future in the labour market.

A summary of the quantitative part of the study can be found on this webpage: http://edu.au.dk/fileadmin/user_upload/PIXI_-_Fremdrifsreform_-_ENGELSK.pdf

Bayesian unknown change-point models to investigate causality in single case designs

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13 June 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Prathiba Natesan, College of Education, University of North Texas

Conveners: Dr James Hall, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Single case designs (SCDs) are widely used to test the effects of interventions in education, psychology, and medicine.  SCDs involve the repeated assessment of an outcome over time (i.e., a time series) within a case, during one or more baseline phases and one or more intervention phases, where the experimenter controls the timing of the phases. There are several challenges to statistical analysis of SCD data. Due to the small sample size, statistical estimates from few observations have considerable sampling uncertainty. This uncertainty is further worsened by autocorrelated errors.

In this talk I will introduce how Bayesian unknown change-point models can be used to confirm the presence of treatment effect. Advantages of Bayesian estimation such as making inferences from small samples, better autocorrelation estimates, posterior distributions (instead of single point estimates), and accommodating several types and distributions of data are particularly useful for SCDs.

Youth unemployment: can labour-market Intermediaries help?

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09 June 2016 16:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room G/H

Speaker: Dr Andre Kraak, Centre for Researching Education and Labour (REAL), University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, SKOPE

For further information and to register for this event, please click here

TEPL Research Group Seminar

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09 June 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Seminar Room C

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

This seminar will be a discussion of the issues explored in Marilyn Cochran-Smith’s Foreword to Beauchamp et al (2015) Teacher Education in Times of Change: Responding to the challenges across the UK and Ireland’ .  The book is an important analysis of teacher education policy across the five nations (with chapters written by two members of the group, Ian Menter and Trevor Mutton) and the foreword helps to locate the key issues within a wider international context.

A pdf of the reading can be downloaded from Weblearn here. If you are not able to access the reading, please contact Phil Richards, Research Secretary.

Considering the role of ontology, epistemology, and theoretical frameworks in the development of your DPhil

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09 June 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Julia Pacitto, Centre for Refugee studies

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

With reference to the development of my DPhil research which looks at the journeys of refugees and asylum seekers to the UK, this session will engage with key methodological questions such as: what assumptions about the nature of knowledge and social existence are implicit within our research designs? What is the connection between methods and methodology, mid-level theory and theoretical frameworks, and epistemological and ontological orientation? How do these interact/overlap? And, what is the place of each of these within a thesis? I will offer insights from my own lengthy and at times challenging navigation through philosophy and theory in the development of my DPhil project, which uses narrative and semi-structured methods to explore the experiences of refugees and asylum seekers during their journeys into exile. The questions identified above are especially pertinent when undertaking research with marginalized populations, where politics and advocacy often influence the way we think about and do research, and where these more abstract theoretical questions have the propensity to be overlooked.

Experiencing developmental crises in critical times: from realising potential futures to actualising virtual possibilities?

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08 June 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr. Michalis Kontopodis, Senior Lecturer in Education Studies, University of Roehampton

Convener: Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

Most theories of psychological development refer to a crisis taking place in adolescence due to physical, cognitive and psychosocial changes. Little research has however explored how young people experience this psychological crisis in the context of today’s broader financial, socio-political and ecological crises. While a crisis indicates a period of intense difficulty, it can also be understood as the turning point when a difficult or important decision must be made – which involves the possibility for the emergence of radical novelty. Drawing on post-Vygotskian and post-structuralist grounds I aspire to explore in my presentation the challenges and possibilities for youth development in this frame. I will propose a differentiation between two modes of human development: development of concrete skills (potential development) and development of new societal relations (virtual development, which is at the same time individual and collective). I will reflect on the significance of this differentiation by exploring research materials from my recent projects with disenfranchised youth in Greece, Germany, US and Brazil. Last but not least, I will expand on the notion of virtual development to consider recent technological developments that enable the multimodal communication and transnational  collaboration among young people from diverse linguistic and geographical contexts.

Dr. Michalis Kontopodis' background comprises psychology, educational science, and youth studies. He accomplished his PhD at the Free University Berlin and is currently working as a Senior Lecturer in Education Studies at the Faculty of Education, University of Roehampton. Before that, he worked at the Humboldt University Berlin and at the University of Amsterdam and was a visiting scholar at the City University of New York; New York University, Moscow State University, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo, and Jawaharlal Nehru University in India. Michalis Kontopodis is a former Secretary of the International Society for Cultural and Activity Research. He has until recently coordinated the international research project DIGIT-M-ED "Global Perspectives on Learning and Development with Digit@l Video-Editing Media". His book "Neoliberalism, Pedagogy and Human Development" has recently been published as a paperback (second edition) with Routledge. Updates and recent publications: http://mkontopodis.wordpress.com

‘Love is a Teacher’: pedagogical attention in The Brothers Karamazov

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07 June 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Peter Roberts, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosphy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with the PESGB

Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov is widely acknowledged as one of the most important philosophical novels ever written.  The Brothers Karamazov deepens and extends Dostoevsky’s treatment of themes addressed in his earlier fiction: the clash of values and worldviews; the tensions between reason, faith and feeling; and the complexities of human relationships.  A key claim made by one character in the book is that ‘love is a teacher’.  Dostoevsky develops a notion of active love, contrasting this with the more abstract principle of loving humankind.  Active love focuses on particulars; it teaches us how to love individual human beings, with all their frailties and flaws.  Iris Murdoch’s concept of attention, adapted from the work of Simone Weil, provides a helpful starting point in exploring some of the broader educational implications of these ideas.

Peter Roberts is Professor of Education at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand.  His primary areas of scholarship are philosophy of education and educational policy studies.  His latest book is Happiness, Hope, and Despair: Rethinking the Role of Education (2016).

Early childhood education in English for speakers of other languages

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07 June 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Professor Victoria Murphy, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Approximately 93% of pre-primary school aged children (up to age 7) participate in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) in Europe – a significant rise on previous years (Eurydice, 2014).  As part of this experience, many children are either taught through the medium of another language or are taught another language as a foreign language. A number of European countries have introduced pilot projects (as of 2012) to increase (usually English) language provision in the pre primary age group (Eurydice, 2012).  Despite the reported prevalence of bilingual education and foreign language instruction in ECEC programmes throughout Europe, relatively few details are available concerning key aspects of this provision.  Very little is known, for example, about the nature of teacher education programmes and qualifications of ECEC teachers, or the nature of the specific provision children across the European Union receive as part of their ECEC through the medium of another language, or taught as a foreign language.  This lack of knowledge results in little to no shared understanding across countries in the European Union – or indeed internationally – together with little research being available to support teachers, teacher educators, policy makers and families. In this presentation I will present the major themes emerging from a recently published volume commissioned by the British Council as an attempt to help mitigate against this lack of understanding of ECEC through the medium of English for non English speakers (Murphy & Evangelou, 2015).

Beyond happiness? Pondering the purpose(s) of education (Public Seminar)

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06 June 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Peter Roberts, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

Over the last two decades a booming industry in ‘happiness’ has emerged.  Academic research on happiness has attracted widespread media attention and spawned a host of more popular publications, many of which have a strong ‘self-help’ flavour.  Happiness is typically construed as something we all want and ought to pursue; indeed, it is often seen as the ultimate end to which our activities are directed.  Education is expected to enhance, not impede, human happiness.  This presentation offers an alternative way of thinking about the nature and purpose of education.  It acknowledges the importance of certain forms of happiness while also investigating the role education has to play in creating discomfort, uncertainty, and unhappiness.

Peter Roberts is Professor of Education and Director of the Educational Theory, Policy and Practice Research Hub at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand.  His primary areas of scholarship are philosophy of education and educational policy studies.  His most recent books include Happiness, Hope, and Despair: Rethinking the Role of Education (2016), Education, Ethics and Existence: Camus and the Human Condition (with Andrew Gibbons and Richard Heraud, 2015), Better Worlds: Education, Art, and Utopia (with John Freeman-Moir, 2013), The Virtues of Openness: Education, Science, and Scholarship in the Digital Age (with Michael Peters, 2011), Paulo Freire in the 21st Century: Education, Dialogue, and Transformation (2010), and Neoliberalism, Higher Education and Research (with Michael Peters, 2008).  In 2012 Peter was a Rutherford Visiting Scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge, and in 2016 he is a Canterbury Fellow at the University of Oxford.  He is the Immediate Past President of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia.

Interaction, moderation, and mediation: definitions, discrimination, and (some) means of testing

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06 June 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr James Hall

Conveners: Dr James Hall, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

In 1986 Baron and Kenny set out to clarify the differences between the terms “Moderation” and “Mediation” as used in the social sciences.  Thirty years later, the seminal paper that this collaboration resulted in (published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology) has been cited 57,965 times (Google Scholar on 09/03/2016).  This is approximately 1,900 times year and on average once every 5 hours of every day, of every year, for thirty years.  However and despite this citation record, the uncertainty surrounding these terms has not gone away.  Academics still struggle to define, distinguish and utilise these terms while related under-graduate and post-graduate teaching is still the exception. This talk sets out simple, clear definitions that distinguish “Mediation” from “Moderation” and “Interaction” as well as all three from a number of other commonly-used terms.  Parallel methods for testing hypotheses of Mediation and Moderation are discussed and demonstrated.

The difference between CHAT and socio-cultural theory

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02 June 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Ian Thompson, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Ian Thompson, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) and sociocultural theory have their origins in the Marxist dialectical psychology of Vygotsky and share his concern with learning as a social activity. Sometimes these terms are used interchangeably to describe research methodologies and methods that focus on analyses of learning and the contexts of learning. Other researchers sharply differentiate between the two theoretical positions. Sociocultural theory, often associated with researchers in the US, focuses on the formation of mind in society and reflects Vygotsky’s emphasis on the centrality of language. Activity theory developed from the work of Vygotsky’s colleague Leontiev with his emphasis on the ‘object motive’ of activity. CHAT analyses how people and organisations learn to do something new through changes in activity.  CHAT researchers such as Engeström or Hedegaard share a concern with culture and activity but with different emphases on systemic activity and interactions in practices respectively. This talk will discuss the connections and differences between CHAT and sociocultural theory with a particular focus on when and how they may be appropriate theoretical frameworks for empirical research.

Tracing academic writing development as it unfolds: case studies of first-year university students

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26 May 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Natalie Usher, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

In this presentation, I will use a case study of one student’s writing development to highlight two issues that can arise during the analysis process: using theory, and coding with NVivo. My doctoral research investigates the impact of participating in peer assessment workshops on first year students’ writing. The study intersects the assessment, writing and self-regulated learning fields. I will show how theory from these fields can be brought together to trace writing development as it unfolds, and reflect on some of the challenges. In addition, I will discuss the affordances and constraints of using NVivo as a tool to manage a messy, multiple source data set.

Identity construction and social inequality – How do first year undergraduate students construct their identities?

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26 May 2016 11:00 - 12:30
Seminar Room H

Speaker: Hannah Sloane, PhD Student, Sociology, University of Paderborn

Convener: Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education Research Group

Despite growing homogeneity among students in German higher education programmes one of the most relevant factors in determining whether young people (can) decide to study is still the educational background of their parents. A person’s identity and their understanding of it usually only becomes a problem when a so-called “crisis” is experienced. The presentation aims to show how these two factors are interconnected and why it is important to have a closer look at identity constructions of first year undergraduate students to better understand the subjectivity of experiences.

Ethics from the perspective of young children’s development: questioning the premises of duty ethics

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24 May 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Tony Eaude, Honorary Norham Fellow, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Education and Religion Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

Drawing on ideas developed in my recent book, I explore how a range of research related to young children’s development may bring into question several premises underlying a view of moral education based on duty ethics.  I argue that simple distinctions between right and wrong do not reflect the vast majority of decisions to be made and that there is no clear age at which children become moral beings. Referring to the work of Wall and Noddings, I suggest that one should be wary of a view of adults being morally superior to children and an individualistic view of ethics. I touch on lessons from neuroeducational research, in relation to the role of emotion, habituation and example. From this, I shall suggest that a Kohlbergian view of moral education as stage-related and based primarily on reasoning is inadequate. I argue rather for an ‘ethic of care’ where children are encouraged from an early age to make judgements, and to act, in ways that take account of the context. This emphasises character development with qualities such as empathy and thoughtfulness encouraged across the whole of children’s, and adults’, lives, as far as possible, rather than just in discrete programmes.

Dr Tony Eaude was previously headteacher of a primary school before completing his doctorate and is now a Norham Fellow at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. His most recent book on which this seminar is based is New Perspectives on Young Children’s Moral Education- Developing Character through a Virtue Ethics Approach, published by Bloomsbury. More details of Tony’s work are available on www.edperspectives.org.uk

Examining factors associated with individual differences in overall L2 proficiency development during study abroad

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24 May 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Gianna Hessel, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Study abroad research has shown that, contrary to common expectations, the linguistic gains made by study abroad participants are often subtle and subject to substantial individual differences. In this presentation, I will examine the role of a range of learner- and programme-related factors in differential overall L2 proficiency gain during study abroad. The discussion will focus primarily on a number of hitherto unexplored factors, including L2 use anxiety with other non-native speakers, self-efficacy in using the L2 in social interactions, the perceived present-future self-discrepancy, as well as attitudes towards one’s own national group.

The data derive from my doctoral research, which is a mixed methods study of 96 German ERASMUS students on study abroad in the UK, whose English proficiency upon programme-entry was upper-intermediate to advanced. All students completed C-tests of overall English language proficiency and questionnaires that inquired into the students’ mobility history, their L2 learning background, L2 motivation, intergroup attitudes and aspects of the study abroad experience itself, including their social contact experiences. Both instruments were administered at the onset of the study abroad period, one term into the programme and prior to the students’ return. Repeated interviews with a sub-sample of 15 students abroad served to illuminate the observed developmental patterns from an emic perspective.

In examining the factors that were associated with differential overall L2 proficiency gain, I will consider the statistical results on the direction and magnitude of these relationships, as well as the insights gained from the over 40 student interviews on how these factors play out in the process of L2 learning abroad. The implications for research and practice will also be discussed.

Measuring and developing second language fluency (Public Seminar)

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23 May 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Judit Kormos, Lancaster University

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Fluency is an important construct in the assessment of language proficiency and forms part of a large number of rating scales in various high stakes exams and in descriptors of levels of second language (L2) competence.

From a pedagogical perspective, developing students’ fluency in another language is one of the most important aims of language teaching. Previous investigations have analyzed L2 fluency primarily with learners of English as a second language. While such research has contributed significantly to our understanding of fluency in L2 English, little is known about how fluency is perceived and evaluated in L2 French despite the fact that previous cross-linguistic research has uncovered important differences between fluency phenomena in French and English. In the first part of this talk I will present a series of studies in which we investigated perceptions of what constitutes fluent L2 French speech (Préfontaine, Kormos & Johnson, 2015; Kormos & Préfontaine, in press).  Our results suggest that there are important differences in the factors that influence ratings and subjective perceptions of fluency in L2 French in comparison with L2 English. In the second part of the talk I present research evidence for how teachers can assist L2 learners in developing their fluency by means of massed task-repetition.

Judit Kormos is a Reader in the Department of Linguistics and English Language at Lancaster University. Her research interests are psychological aspects of second language learning, motivation, learner autonomy in foreign language contexts, and language learners with special needs.

Exploring the effects of economic deprivation on the trajectory of conduct problems in preschool children

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23 May 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Edward Sosu, School of Education, University of Strathclyde

Conveners: Dr James Hall, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Strong associations between economic deprivation and conduct problems suggest a causal link between poverty and conduct trajectories. However, the mechanism of effect remains unclear. Drawing on models of family stress and investment, I will examine how experiences of economic deprivation in early childhood have both direct and indirect effects on conduct problems in the preschool years. The study will draw on a prospective longitudinal data from Scotland using multiple indicator latent growth models (LGM). Approaches to data analysis as well as policy implications of the findings will be discussed.

Context and the researching and teaching of academic writing

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19 May 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Professor Brian Paltridge, University of Sydney

Convener: Dr Heath Rose, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Learning to write in the academy involves acquiring a repertoire of linguistic practices which are based on complex sets of discourses, identities, and values. These practices, however, vary according to context, culture and genre. This presentation discusses how these issues can be taken up in the researching and teaching of academic writing. It will do this, first, by examining how the notion of context is taken up theoretically in linguistics research more broadly and, then, how contextualised understandings of the use of language have been explored by academic writing researchers. It will then discuss ways in which the context in which students’ writing is produced impacts on the texts they are expected to produce and how students can be made aware of, and take account of this in their writing.

Co-creating education reform with actor-network theory

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19 May 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Laura Louise Sarauw, Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow, Aarhus University, Denmark

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

In the talk I will share my experiences from working with a symmetrical research design, involving a variety of actors in the process of knowledge creation. Firstly, I introduce briefly the potentials of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) as a means of questioning, and eventually escaping, the formal policy level as the “natural” point of departure for studying policy reform. Secondly, by pointing to my experiences from an on-going study on a Danish subset of the European Bologna process, in which I invited relevant actors to participate in formulating the research questions, I concretise—and critically review—how ANT may feed new insights as well as challenges into the research process.

Youth civic engagement in the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement

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17 May 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Liz Jackson, University of Hong Kong

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in association with PESGB

Traditionally Hong Kong education has been conceived as “de-politicized,” and its population as apolitical and materialistic. However, the youth-led Umbrella Movement of 2014-2015, with its bases in Occupy Central and the National Education controversy of 2012, put an end to such discourses. Though initially perceived as the result of a recent curriculum reform, research reveals these movements reflect youth desires for democratic engagement in political processes not driven by educators or other adults in society. This movement has also given youth from ethnic minority communities an opportunity to identify themselves as local, providing a valuable lesson to these and mainstream youth alike. On the other hand, government responses to these events, as well as intergenerational struggles, have led to a kind of tragic political education for many, who have come to see the Umbrella Movement as a lesson in powerlessness and hopelessness over time. This presentation discusses the political identities constructed by youth in recent years in Hong Kong and civic engagement’s role in civic education.

Liz Jackson is Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Hong Kong, Division of Policy, Administration, and Social Sciences Education. Her research interests include multicultural education, citizenship education, and global studies in education. Her book, Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education: Reconsidering Multiculturalism (Routledge, 2014) won the 2015 Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia Book Award and 2014-2015 University of Hong Kong Research Output Prize for the Faculty of Education. Her current research explores global citizenship and civic identity and multiculturalism/interculturalism in Hong Kong.

Building mathematical knowledge with programming (Public Seminar) - CANCELLED

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16 May 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Professor Richard Noss and Professor Celia Hoyles, UCL Institute of Education

Conveners: Dr Niall Winters and Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Learning and New Technologies and Subject Pedagogy Research Groups

The importance of isomorphism for conclusions about homology: a Bayesian multilevel structural equation modelling approach with ordinal indicators

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16 May 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Nigel Guenole, Goldsmiths, University of London

Conveners: Dr James Hall, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

I will describe a Monte Carlo study examining the impact of assuming item isomorphism (i.e., equivalent construct meaning across levels of analysis) on conclusions about homology (i.e., equivalent structural relations across levels of analysis) under varying degrees of non-isomorphism in the context of ordinal indicator multilevel structural equation models (MSEMs).  The study results  show that even minor violations of psychometric isomorphism render claims of homology untenable. I will discuss implications for theoretical and applied work on surveying in multilevel contexts. The article on which the talk is based is available here.

Advanced structural equation modelling

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13 May 2016 09:00 - 16:00
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Instructor: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

This follow-up of the introduction to SEM is an advanced course in which we focus on SEM for longitudinal and multilevel data. Prospective longitudinal data is usually collected over longer periods of time (e.g., yearly) while intensive longitudinal is gathered within shorter time-spans (e.g., numerous times a day). Both cross-sectional and longitudinal data can be collected applying a nested structure (e.g., students in classrooms, parents in families, time-points in persons). Using SEM we can model repeated latent constructs over time, or across hierarchical levels net of measurement error. In this course we will start off with analysis of models in which the time-structure is explicit. We will then introduce multilevel structural equation models (MSEM), in which we specify models in which time is not explicitly modeled. We will end with models in which the time-structure is explicit in multilevel data.

During the course we will cover worked examples relevant for educational, psychological and social sciences. Participants need to understand the basics of multiple regression, other relevant multivariate statistics, and have some exposure to either multilevel regression or SEM.

Programme

Overview of SEM for longitudinal data. Repeated measures and autoregressive models with manifest and latent constructs.

10:30 - 10:45 Break

10:45 - 12:30 The latent growth model; Coding of time and error structures..

12:30-13:00 Lunch

13:00-14:30Multilevel factor structures and Multilevel structural models (MSEM) with covariates; Contrasting examples using time-points in students, students in classrooms, and parents in families.

14:30-14:45 Break

14:45 - 16:00 Practise session

Software: We will mainly use the Mplus software

Cost: £25 for OU students, £100 for staff and external students

Cost includes lunch, refreshments and all course materials

Click here to make a booking

Narrowing your focus in an ocean of data

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12 May 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Michael Maher King, DPhil candidate in Social Policy

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

This seminar is aimed at students who are or will be managing a large amount of qualitative data. It will be useful for students who are planning on conducting fieldwork and for students who have recently returned from their fieldwork. After 13 months of ethnographic fieldwork in local social services in Japan I returned to Oxford with several metres of (mostly) neatly filed paperwork, countless hours of interview recordings, hundreds of meeting transcripts, and a large quantity of daily fieldwork notes. The data was predominantly in Japanese though some key sections were in English. This seminar focuses on practical research methods and analysis strategies for effectively managing and making sense of your data. I will share the mistakes I made as well as the things that I would do in the same way again, covering strategies for archiving your data during fieldwork, establishing what is important in your data, systematically ordering your data for analysis, and starting the analysis process.

Introduction to structural equation modelling

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12 May 2016 09:00 - 16:00
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Instructors: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Carol Brown and Dr Daniel Caro, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

The concept of a latent construct is central in the social sciences. A latent construct is a not directly observed phenomenon (e.g., attitude, socioeconomic status) that we can model using manifest (observed) variables (e.g., survey and questionnaire responses, observation scores), by partitioning out residual (i.e., uniqueness, error variance). The structural equation model (SEM) is divided into two parts. In the measurement part of the model, we can inspect whether manifest variables measure the constructs they are intended to measure. This model is called confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) which allows the researcher to test whether an a priori model fits data, and whether this also holds across multiple groups. If measurement is satisfactory, the relationships between constructs can be estimated in the structural part of the SEM. Complex relationships between manifest variables and/or latent constructs can be tested in path-models not possible to specify in the multiple regression framework. During the course we will cover worked examples relevant for educational, psychological and social sciences. Participants need to understand the basics of multiple regression, or other relevant multivariate statistics.

Programme

09:00 - 10:30 Introduction: Basic concepts, models and measurement. From multiple regression to path-models using manifest variables.

10:30 - 10:45 Break

10:45 - 12:30 Observed (manifest) variables and unobserved (latent) constructs. Specification of measurement models for testing quality of measurement, using continuous and dichotomous manifest variables. Goodness-of-fit indices.

12:30-13:00 Lunch

13:00 - 14:30 Relationships between latent constructs. Specifying structural models to include directional (regression) paths between latent constructs.

14:30-14:45 Break

14:45 - 16:00 Practise session

Software: We will mainly use the Mplus software

Cost: £25 for OU students, £100 for staff and external students

Cost includes lunch, refreshments and all course materials

Click here to make a booking

Advanced multilevel modelling

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11 May 2016 09:00 - 16:00
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Instructors: Dr Lorena Ortega, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Daniel Caro, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

Multilevel Modelling (MLM) is a flexible statistical technique that allows us to examine effects of groups or contexts on individual outcomes. MLM has found fertile ground in educational research as it facilitates working with clustered or hierarchical data frequently encountered in the field (e.g., students nested within classrooms, teachers nested within schools, measurement occasions nested within individuals, schools within countries, etc.)

Examples of multilevel research in education include studying the impact of school characteristics on student outcomes and analysing change on subjects measured on multiple occasions.

This one-day workshop will introduce advanced MLM by providing an overview of MLM for change to model longitudinal data and advanced MLM for non-hierarchical data structures (i.e., cross-classified and multiple membership models). Lectures will be combined with hands-on practical exercises using the software packages SPSS and R.

Course prerequisites: Participants need to have attended the Introduction to Multilevel Modelling course or be familiar with multilevel modelling

Programme

09:00-10:30 MLM for change

10:30 - 10:45 Break

10:45-12:00 Cross-classified models

12:00-12:30 Lunch

12:30-14:00 Multiple membership models

14:00-14:15 Break

14:15 - 16:00 Practise session

Cost: £25 for OU students, £100 for staff and external students

Cost includes lunch, refreshments and all course materials

Click here to make a booking

Introduction to multilevel modelling

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10 May 2016 09:00 - 16:00
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Instructors: Dr Daniel Caro, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr Lorena Ortega, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

This one-day workshop will introduce multilevel modelling (MLM) for the analysis of educational data. Lectures will be combined with hands-on practical exercises using software packages SPSS and R. Participants will learn to address substantive research questions with MLM following an analytic framework consisting of hypothesis, model specification, critical test, and interpretation of results.

Course prerequisites: Participants need to understand the basics of multiple regression, or other relevant multivariate statistics.

Programme

09:00 - 10:30 Introduction to MLM

10:30 - 10:45 Break

10:45 - 12:30 MLM in SPSS

12:30 - 13:00 Lunch

13:00 - 14:30 MLM in R

14:30 - 14:45 Break

14:45 - 16:00 Practise session

Cost: £25 for OU students, £100 for staff and external students

Cost includes lunch, refreshments and all course materials

Click here to make a booking

Rather than a pill…”: Reflections on parents, children and scientific parenting (Public Seminar)

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09 May 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Judith Suissa, UCL Institute of Education and Dr Stefan Ramaekers, University of Leuven

Conveners: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum

The background to this presentation is our recent work on the changing discourse of ‘parenting’, where we explore accounts of childrearing and the parent-child relationship in order to suggest a philosophically-informed analysis of the practical experience of being a parent.

Central to this work is a critique of the scientization of the parent-child relationship, focussed on two interrelated issues: the psychologization of this relationship, i.e. that the meaning and significance of childrearing is predominantly expressed in the languages of psychology (specifically neuropsychology); and the professionalization of parents, i.e. that parents are expected to see themselves as learning subjects, who must continuously gain more knowledge (provided by the disciplines of psychology), and so must refine their skills in order to properly raise their children. In our work, our concern is with how the scientific account of parenting defines and restricts both how we think and talk about childrearing and the parent-child relationship and also, therefore, how parents understand themselves.

In this talk, we will focus on Oliver James’ Love-Bombing; Reset Your Child’s Emotional Thermostat, a popular book aimed at parents, which, as we will discuss, exemplifies some of the philosophical, ethical and political problems inherent in the dominant account of scientific parenting.

Dr Judith Suissa is Reader in Philosophy of Education at the UCL Institute of Education. Her research interests are in political and moral philosophy, with a particular focus on questions to do with the control of education, social justice, libertarian and anarchist theory, the role of the state, political education, and the parent-child relationship. Her publications include Anarchism and Education; a Philosophical Perspective (Routledge, 2006) and The Claims of Parenting; Reasons, Responsibility and Society (with Stefan Ramaekers, Springer, 2012).

Dr Stefan Ramaekers is Senior Lecturer in the Laboratory for Education and Society, KU Leuven. Over the last years, his research has mainly focused on a critical investigation of the discourse of ‘parenting’ and the parent-child relationship and on the ‘pedagogical’ significance of educational support. Together with Dr. Judith Suissa of the Institute of Education (University College London) he published the book The Claims of Parenting: reasons, responsibility, and society (Springer). Recently he has started collaborating with Dr. Naomi Hodgson on researching figurations of ‘parenting’ in cultural representations, such as film.

High-quality teacher professional development, teachers’ co-operation and classroom practices: evidence from TALIS 2013

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09 May 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Fabian Barrera-Pedemonte, Institute of Education, University College London

Conveners: Dr James Hall, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

The majority of teachers in developed countries and emerging economies are now expected to engage in activities of professional development (TPD). Recent literature has demonstrated that TPD that is focused on content knowledge, and delivered with greater degrees of collective participation, active learning and longer duration, is associated with teaching practices in specific contexts. The most recent cycle of the “Teaching and Learning International Survey” (OECD/TALIS) gathered information on these dimensions from 31 countries, which opened an interesting opportunity to analyse whether the features of high-quality TPD are globally related to the way teachers develop their lessons in the classroom. However, a realistic approach to this outcome suggests that not only TPD contributes to explaining instruction, but also teachers’ engagement in practices that informally support their professional learning in the school (teachers’ co-operation). I used an Ordinal Regression Model to estimate the relationship between specific classroom practices and each of the features of high-quality TPD, using as controls the “Co-operation among teaching staff scale” and other teachers’ background characteristics. Results suggested that most of the features of TPD seemed to increase the odds of using specific instructional methods in several countries. However, I found a more consistent contribution of teachers’ co-operation on such outcomes across all the 31 countries, from which implications for research, policy and practice are drawn.

Introduction to R for the analysis of educational data

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09 May 2016 09:00 - 16:00
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Instructor: Dr Daniel Caro, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

This course will introduce the R programming language for statistical analysis in the RStudio graphical user interface. During the morning participants will learn the basics of the R language and data analysis in R, including how to create and import data, calculate descriptive statistics, perform regression analysis, and conduct analysis by grouping variables. In the afternoon, international assessments and related data analysis challenges (e.g., plausible values, replicate weights) will be introduced. Hands-on exercises will reproduce main results in international assessment reports with the R package 'instvy' (http://users.ox.ac.uk/~educ0279/). The last part of the workshop will be dedicated to an assignment and answering questions.

Course prerequisites: It is assumed that participants will have a background in basic statistical methods up to, and including, regression analysis. Some familiarity with syntax language from other statistical packages (e.g., Stata, SPSS) is desirable.

Programme

09:00 - 09:30 Welcome, agenda, software installation

09:30 - 10:45 Brief introduction to R

10:45 - 11: 00 Break

11:00 - 12:30 R basics for data analysts

12:30 - 13:00 Lunch

13:00 - 13:30 Complex design of international assessments

13:30 - 15:00 Using 'intsvy' to analyse international assessment data

15:00 - 15:15 Break

15:15 - 16:00 Practise session

Cost: £25 for OU students, £100 for staff and external students

Cost includes lunch, refreshments and all course materials

Click here to make a booking

18th International ECERS Meeting

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05 May 2016 -

Email Emily Turner for further information.

Education in an era of superdiversity: effective ways to reach all learners

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04 May 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor David Mitchell, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

In this presentation, David Mitchell will give a preview of his forthcoming book, Diversities in Education (Routledge), which focuses on gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status, religion and ability differences. He argues that it is an indictment on politicians and educators that underachievement and discrimination among diverse learners has been tolerated for so long. He further argues that this situation need not continue for we know enough about its causes and remedies to take effective action. In his presentation, David will address several themes pertaining to diversity, including theories of distributive justice, inclusive education, human rights, an ecological perspective, interest convergence, mismatches of cultural capital, disruptive technologies, and evidence-based policies and practices.

David Mitchell is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. He has over 200 publications, mainly in the fields of special and inclusive education. He has held visiting professorships and has presented lectures and workshops in over 50 countries. His most recent consultancies with the New Zealand Ministry of Education include a review of the literature on wraparound models of services for students with severe behavioural and social difficulties and a review of educational adaptations for learners from low-socioeconomic families. His most recent books are Contextualizing Inclusive Education (2005/2008) and What Really Works in Special and Inclusive Education, Second edition (2014), both published by Routledge. The latter has been or will be translated into six languages. As well, he co-edited a book, Crises, Conflict and Disability: Ensuring Equality, which was also published by Routledge (2014). His next book, Diversities in Education will be published in September.

Adopting a Vygotskian approach to studying children’s mobile applications and early digital literacies

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03 May 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Sumin Zhao, Visiting Research Associate, UCL Institute of Education

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels, OSAT

Experiencing master's dissertation supervision: two supervisors' perspectives

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03 May 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr. Nigel Harwood, University of Sheffield

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

As master’s and doctoral programmes expand, a growing body of research has focused on a major component of these programmes: the dissertation/thesis candidates write, and the experiences and practices of dissertation/thesis supervisees and supervisors. This body of work, which mainly focuses on doctoral study, has pointed to a high degree of variability in both supervisory experiences and practices. In this talk I focus on the less-researched arena of master’s study, and on the supervisor’s rather than the supervisee’s perspective. I present findings regarding two supervisors’ experiences of supervising non-native students who were tackling their master’s dissertations at a UK university.

Using a multiple case study approach (e.g. Duff 2008; Merriam 1998), I interviewed the supervisors about the supervision, analysed the students’ drafts and final dissertation chapters, their supervisors’ comments and feedback on this writing, and the markers’ reports on the final dissertations. In addition, I examined supporting materials on supervision provided by the subject departments (e.g. handbooks, dissertation writing guidelines, assessment criteria).

I focus on supervisors in two different social science departments: Billy and Harriet. Both supervisors had recently taken up post, but Billy was a highly experienced supervisor of 17 years’ standing while Harriet had never supervised before. Although both Billy and Harriet’s supervisees wrote successful dissertations which were awarded distinction grades, the supervisors’ experiences were not trouble-free (confirmed by supervisees’ interviews). Specifically, Billy supervised a dissertation outside his area of expertise, his supervisee had difficulties grasping methodological concepts, failed to adhere to deadlines to submit draft chapters, and was out of contact for several weeks; while Harriet’s supervisee decided to change her research hypotheses late in the day, and produced a weak methods chapter. In the face of these difficulties Billy was sanguine, while Harriet’s narrative featured moments of uncertainty and guilt about her practices. Billy spoke of the ‘arrogance of longevity’ his experience afforded him and how he was confident he knew how to supervise. His practices were characterised by flexibility as he reportedly altered his approach depending on students’ needs and abilities—and as he did when his supervisee began missing deadlines. He was therefore resistant to institutional attempts to impose rigid departmental supervisory practices. In contrast, Harriet was conscious of her department’s more prescribed supervisory norms and, despite disapproving of the policy that she was only allowed to read and comment on one of her supervisees’ draft chapters (the results chapter), conformed to it, ensuring that she could not be accused by her department of intervening inappropriately.

I argue that these cases raise questions about supervisory policies and provide food for thought for university policy makers attempting to draw up supervisory guidelines. For instance, how relaxed should departments be about supervisors being allocated supervisees beyond their areas of disciplinary competence? How many drafts and pieces of written work should supervisors be allowed to comment on? How much and what type of feedback should it be permitted to provide? Most fundamentally, how much autonomy should supervisors be allowed to vary their practices and their supervisory styles?

I close on a less normative note, by discussing the tensions identified in the data between the supervisors’ inner convictions (e.g., their beliefs about best supervisory practice) and the departmental supervisory regulations, and how these tensions are (un)resolved, then broaden this discussion out to reflections on supervisor autonomy in the face of the performative and instrumental discourses surrounding the contemporary university.

Challenges and constraints of collecting qualitative data in schools

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28 April 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Carol Brown, OUCEA and Oxford Brookes

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

This presentation will address some of the challenges and constraints experienced when collecting qualitative data in secondary schools. It is based on the researcher’s experience of conducting semi-structured interviews in two different research studies. Firstly using interviews as part of a mixed methods design with 20 A-level students from Oxfordshire schools to the explore factors that motivate them to achieve. Secondly employing them to interview 49 teachers across England as part of a large scale project examining the impact of the new linear and modular GCSE’s. The challenges and constraints discussed will include those associated with sampling, access, design of interview schedules and coding. Lessons learned from the perspective of a novice researcher will also be discussed.

Supporting the development of looked-after children: what we know and what we need to do (Public Seminar)

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25 April 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Sara McLean, University of South Australia

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, REES Centre for Research in Fostering and Education

This seminar will summarise a program of research that has been conducted at the Australian Centre for Child Protection. This program aims to synthesize and translate current research on the developmental needs of looked after children into effective interventions and supports.

Dr McLean will describe the findings from structured literature reviews about the needs of looked after children.

Combining this knowledge with the views of almost 400 foster carers has created a profile of the support needs for looked after children. The implications of these findings for supporting educational and placement stability will be explored. Because of the often invisible impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on development, the needs of this group of looked-after children will be emphasised.

Sara McLean is a psychologist and researcher at the Australian Centre for Child Protection.

She has been working in the area of child and adolescent mental health since 1997.

She is committed to developing more effective supports to meet the needs of looked-after children, through highlighting their learning and behavioural needs and developing more tailored support to foster carers.

PhD students´ writing conceptions and psychological well-being

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25 April 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Maria Cerrato Lara, Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development, Oxford Brookes University

Conveners: Dr James Hall, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub

Academic writing has traditionally received little attention in PhD studies. Paradoxically, thesis writing is highly demanding in that students are expected to contribute to academia through publication. The aim of this study was to investigate the writing conceptions of 631 Spanish students who completed The Writing Process Questionnaire and to relate them with their psychological well-being using a scale of the MED NORD questionnaire (Lonka et al., 2008) –adapted to the PhD context in Pyhältö et al. (2009). Results revealed interesting findings at three levels: 1) the validation of the instrument, differing from its original structure on one factor, demonstrated the development of knowledge in writing perceived by Spanish as a solitary process rather than collaborative; 2) our descriptive analyses showed that young females were the most likely to procrastinate, and mature students in the Arts conveyed a more constructivist epistemology of writing. Moreover, the females in all cases leaned more towards perfectionism and also in all of the groups those undecided about thesis format experienced lower sense of productivity, and 3) an analysis of writers’ profiles revealed a relationship between writing and well-being. Our research sheds light on students’ conceptions about academic writing within a specific context, advances understanding on the extent to which certain variables are background-related or institutionalized by the research community, and offers an explanatory framework to explain the link between writing conceptions and psychological well-being.

A conceptual approach to assessing achievement and progress in mathematics

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17 March 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Ian Jones, Mathematics Education Centre, Loughborough University

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Mathematics exams tend to assess general achievement through testing procedural knowledge across a sample of mathematical domains. In this presentation I will describe an alternative approach that instead tests conceptual understanding across domains. Open-ended test questions, which focus on specific concepts (e.g. fractions), are administered to students and the responses scored using a comparative judgement technique. The scores are then aggregated to produce an overall score of general mathematical achievement for each student. I will present two recent studies conducted with Key Stage 3 students. The findings suggest that the approach, if carefully designed, produces valid and reliable outcomes when used to assess general achievement and progress in school mathematics.

Mathematics Education Reading Group

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17 March 2016 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group Readings:

  • Sidney, P. G., Hattikudur, S., & Alibali, M. W. (2015). How do contrasting cases and self-explanation promote learning? Evidence from fraction division. Learning and Instruction, 40, 29-38.
  • Wood, M. B. (2016). Rituals and right answers: barriers and supports to autonomous activity.  Educational Studies in Mathematics 91(3), 327-348.

STORIES 2016

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15 March 2016 -

Secular institutions, Islam, and education policy: France and the U.S. in comparative perspective (Seminar cancelled)

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10 March 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Paola Mattei, Department of Social Policy and Intervention

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Let’s Talk! An intervention supporting children’s vocabulary and narrative development through sustained planned pretend play and group shared storybook reading in the early years

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09 March 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Dr Gillian Lake, Oxford Brookes University

Convener: Professor Terezinha Nunes for the Children Learning and Families, Effective Learning and Literacy (FELL) Research Groups

Exploring changes in overall L2 proficiency as an outcome of ERASMUS study abroad and common factors associated with differential linguistic development

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08 March 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Gianna Hessel, Department of Education

An Applied Linguistics Lunchtime Seminar convened by: Dr Jess Briggs

Promoting quality in education: a dynamic approach to school improvement (Public Seminar)

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07 March 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Leonidas Kyriakides, University of Cyprus

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

This lecture refers to the dynamic approach to school improvement (DASI) which attempts to contribute to the merging of educational effectiveness research and school improvement. The main underlying assumptions and the implementation phases of DASI are presented. The recommended approach gives emphasis to school policies and actions taken to improve teaching and the school learning environment. Moreover, the importance of establishing school evaluation mechanisms and collecting data to identify improvement priorities is stressed. Furthermore, DASI emphasizes the use of the available knowledge base in relation to the main aims of the efforts made by schools to deal with the different challenges/problems being faced. Therefore, an advisory and research team is expected to support school stakeholders develop, implement, and evaluate their own school improvement strategies and action plans. Five group-randomization studies investigating the impact of DASI on promoting quality in education are also presented. These studies reveal the conditions in which DASI can promote student learning outcomes. Finally, suggestions for research, policy and practice are provided.

Dr Leonidas Kyriakides is Professor of Educational Research and Evaluation at the University of Cyprus. His field of research and scholarship is the evaluation of educational effectiveness, whether of teachers, schools or educational systems. Currently his research agenda is concerned with the development of a dynamic model of educational effectiveness, and the application of research to the improvement of educational practice. Leonidas has been involved in several international projects. His work has contributed not only to theory improvement but also to the testing of theoretical models and using them for improving the quality of education. He was also a member of the PISA 2015 QEG expert group that was responsible for developing the theoretical framework and the questionnaires of PISA 2015 study. Finally, he is member of the editorial board of various international journals with referee system and the author of more than 100 papers, 8 books, and 80 chapters in books. 

Using multilevel SEM techniques to identify the impact of school policy and teachers actions on student learning: a longitudinal study

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07 March 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Leonidas Kyriakides, University of Cyprus

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

This presentation proposes a theoretical framework on how school policy can promote student learning. School policy is considered to have an indirect effect on student achievement by changing school stakeholders' actions toward improving the School Learning Environment (SLE) and the teaching practice. A reciprocal relationship between school policy and stakeholders' actions is also considered. The second part of this presentation argues that multilevel SEM techniques can be used to test the main assumptions of this theoretical framework. To illustrate this argument, the presentation presents a longitudinal study which made use of multilevel SEM techniques to test the framework's main assumptions. Specifically, a stratified sample of 64 primary schools in Cyprus was selected and students' achievement in Mathematics at the beginning of Grade 4 and at the end of the next three consecutive school years was measured, alongside the school policy and teachers' actions with regards to issues associated with teaching and the SLE. The results of multilevel SEM analyses are presented and implications for research, policy and practice are drawn.

Dr Leonidas Kyriakides is Professor of Educational Research and Evaluation at the University of Cyprus. His field of research and scholarship is the evaluation of educational effectiveness, whether of teachers, schools or educational systems. Currently his research agenda is concerned with the development of a dynamic model of educational effectiveness, and the application of research to the improvement of educational practice. Leonidas has been involved in several international projects. His work has contributed not only to theory improvement but also to the testing of theoretical models and using them for improving the quality of education. He was also a member of the PISA 2015 QEG expert group that was responsible for developing the theoretical framework and the questionnaires of PISA 2015 study. Finally, he is member of the editorial board of various international journals with referee system and the author of more than 100 papers, 8 books, and 80 chapters in books. 

Trouble in the classroom: researching from a cultural-historical perspective adolescent disruption of teaching and learning

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03 March 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Dr Malcolm Reed, University of Bristol Graduate School of Education

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

This presentation continues a long-term interest in understanding and re-conceptualising classroom interaction. It will report research being undertaken in a state secondary school, working alongside English teachers as a participant researcher and occasional teacher on a weekly basis over eighteen months. I attend particularly to learners’ negativity, how it may be interpreted, and how it both shapes and responds to immediate and broad contradictions in learning and teaching activity. Drawing on a range of perspectives in cultural-historical theory, in particular those of Vygotsky, Bozhovich, Davydov, El’konin and Hedegaard, I seek to trouble our account of pedagogy and reflect self-critically on the process of doing classroom-based research.

Malcolm Reed taught English across the 1980s within the Inner London Education Authority, moved to the University of Bristol in 1990 where he led the PGCE English programme for twenty years, and has taught and coordinated educational research methods on doctoral programmes since 2006. He is the current President of the International Society for Cultural-historical Activity Research (ISCAR).

Ways of visualising non-numerical data

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03 March 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Alis Oancea and Zainab Kabba, DPhil student, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Two researchers from the department will talk about their experiences in using visualisation techniques with non-numerical data. Visualising non-numerical data can be a useful part of all stages of research, from planning through to fieldwork, analysis, reporting, and wider engagement and dissemination. Zainab Kabba and Dr Alis Oancea will talk about the benefits and challenges of different approaches and share examples from their own work, before offering up the floor to a wide-ranging discussion to which attendees are invited to bring their own experiences and thoughts.

Motivation and reading in children and adolescents

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02 March 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Jane Hurry, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, UCL

Convener: Professor Terezinha Nunes for the Children Learning and Families, Effective Learning and Literacy (FELL) Research Groups

EAP teachers‘ cognitions and practices in teaching lexis in two Turkish private universities: an exploratory qualitative study

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01 March 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr. Sukru Nural, Murat Hüdavendigar University

An Applied Linguistics Lunchtime Seminar convened by: Dr Jess Briggs

A large body of empirical research has suggested that lexis is a major concern for learners and teachers in the language classroom context. A wide recognition of the crucial role of lexis in language learning and teaching culminated in sets of principles proposed by some vocabulary researchers (Barcroft, 2002; Laufer, 2005a; Meara, 2005; Nation, 2005a; Sökmen, 1997; Zimmerman, 2008). However, it is important to acknowledge that teachers know more about the constraints and demands of their own contexts than decontextualised expert principles can allow for. In the present study, the underlying reasons why teachers teach lexis in the way they do are examined. Particularly, the main thrust of the study is to explore the relationship between two EAP teachers‘ cognitions and practices of lexis teaching in preparatory schools of two private universities in Turkey. The data generation instruments used in the study include classroom observations, field notes, stimulated recall, and semi-structured follow-up interviews. The findings of the study suggest that although the teachers have students with similar profiles and characteristics they seem to have different tendencies towards provision of lexical knowledge. Apart from the factors underpinning the difference in their tendencies, the relationship between teachers‘ cognitions and practices of lexis teaching were also identified with specific reference to the determinants that have a role to play in the correspondence between their beliefs and actual classroom behaviour. With its implications for teacher education and teacher cognition research, this case study also complements classroom-based research into form-focused instruction in general and lexis instruction in particular.

Closing the Gap: issues, challenges and impact of the implementation of a national experiment in educational research (Public Seminar)

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29 February 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Ann Childs, Dr Nigel Fancourt, Dr Roger Firth, Professor Ian Menter and Dr Ian Thompson, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

During 2012, the National College for Teaching and Leadership, working in collaboration with a number of partners, designed a major research and development initiative entitled Closing the Gap - Test and Learn.  The contract to run the project was awarded to CfBT who worked in partnership with CUREE and the Universities of Durham and Oxford to deliver the scheme from 2012-2015.

They invited lead teaching schools in teaching school alliances to apply to take part in a national trial of seven particular intervention programmes, each of which had been identified as having significant potential in 'closing the attainment gap'.  That is, they were programmes designed to improve the attainment of children who were low achievers.  A total of more than 700 Schools joined the programme in its first year and bid to work with one or more of the interventions.  Half of the schools went into the trial group and commenced the programme during 2014.  The other half of the schools went into a control group and waited until the next academic year to undertake the programme.  In all schools a sample of pupils was identified for participation in the scheme and were given pre- and post-tests before and at the end of the Year 1 trial period.  The scheme was thus designated as a form of Randomised Control Trial

In this seminar the Oxford team offer an analysis of the project as a whole, drawing not only on data gathered during its implementation but also on additional data derived from interviews with a number of participants.

In particular we look at:

  • the 'policy origins' of the entire scheme, the ways in which it emerged out of: the development of teaching schools, the 'closing the gap' objective of the Coalition government; the desire to increase research capacity within the teaching workforce; as well as other elements;
  • the extent to which the overall methodology can indeed be described as a Randomised Control Trial. Although this was a very large scale initiative, the actual interventions were each carried out with relatively small numbers of pupils in a very diverse range of contexts;
  • the extent to which evidence emerged from the project to suggest that teachers in schools were becoming increasingly research-literate and that the 'school-led system' was developing research capacity through engagement in a scheme such as this;
  • the research ethics issues raised by such a large scale randomised controlled trial, and in particular the decisions around which interventions to include and continue, which leads on to an argument for a principle of educational equipoise.

A nuanced view of motivational effects on academic achievement: A case for parental aspiration, competition, and mastery goals

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29 February 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Kou Murayama, University of Reading

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Many people in education typically think that motivation has uniform, positive influences on students' academic achievement --- that is, the more motivated students are, the better grades they can attain. However, not all motivations are adaptive. Research in educational psychology revealed that there are different types of motivations, and they have both positive and negative implications for students' learning. In this presentation, I will illustrate the points with our programmes of research, using a variety of techniques such as longitudinal data analsis (e.g., latent growth curve model, dual change score model), behavioural experiments, and meta-analysis. The topics include parental aspiration, competition, and mastery (vs. performance) goals.

Political discourse and education reforms concerning "equality of educational opportunity" in Japan

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25 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Akito Okada, Institute of Global Studies, Graduate School, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies.

Convener: Dr David Johnson, Centre for Comparative and International Education in association with the Oxford Education Society.

Abstract

This presentation aims to throw light on the evolution and historical transformation of the concept of equality of opportunity as applied to educational policies in Japan from the end of World War II to the present day. It analyses the Central Council for Education’s (CCE: Chūō kyōiku shingikai) reform proposals in recent years, and places them in the context of developing the concept of equality of educational opportunity in the years since 1945, when the post-war education system was established in Japan.

More specifically it addresses the following questions: What kinds of equality of educational opportunity have the central administrative bodies (Ministry of Education or the CCE), the political parties (mainly Liberal Democratic Party) and teachers aimed to achieve since the war? How have they applied equality of opportunity to educational policies? What kinds of criteria are used by them to measure equality of educational opportunity?

This presentation is also to expand on the existing literature on educational policies in contemporary Japan by examining how the current educational reform efforts have affected equality of educational opportunity among children from different family backgrounds.

Dr Akito Okada is an alumnus of the Department of Education having completed his DPhil in Comparative and International Education in 1998 under the supervision of Professor Roger Goodman and Professor David Phillips. Akito is currently Professor at the Institute of Global Studies, Graduate School, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies and a visiting fellow at University College London from October 2015 to March 2016.

He is central coordinator for the international students’ education program (ISEP TUFS), and responsible for the delivery of lectures from the doctoral to undergraduate and research students.

His research interests include comparative and international education, intercultural communication, education reform and policy, international student education and education for international understanding. He is the author of “Education Policy and Equal Opportunity in Japan”.

10/65 and all that: resistance to comprehensive reform in Buckinghamshire schools 1962-1975

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25 February 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dorothy Makin, DPhil student, Faculty of History

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

To this day, Buckinghamshire is one of only two local education authorities in England operating a fully selective secondary system.  Its grammar schools rank as some of the top state schools in the country and its secondary modern schools (now upper schools and in many cases academies outside LEA control) present a varied and sometimes excellent picture in terms of performance. However, systematic underfunding, repeated instances of school failure, and sometimes school closure have detracted from the esteem and confidence which the non-selective sector has been able to command. Despite such variation, a 2004 review of the county’s practices noted that the authority’s ‘commitment to selection [was] unequivocal.’ Using a wide range of official archives and press sources, this paper explores how it was that the Buckinghamshire LEA came to cling to selection so tenaciously and investigates how key figures and debates in the 1960s and early 1970s acted to lock the county into a particular trajectory of educational development for the remainder of the century.

The importance of morphological word stems for children's spelling/The role of representations in multiplicative reasoning

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24 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Lauren Burton, Department of Education and Lucy Ellis, National Foundation for Educational Research

Convener: Professor Terezinha Nunes for the Children Learning and Families, Effective Learning and Literacy (FELL) Research Groups

Doing feminist work in a Christian setting: teaching gender and education as an undergraduate course at a small Canadian university

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23 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room C

Speaker: Professor Allyson Jule, Trinity Western University, Canada

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea,  Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum in conjunction with PESGB Oxford

This presentation describes and discusses the current complexities of establishing a Gender and Education module in a private Christian liberal arts university in Western Canada. Class composition in relation to the specific university is considered here, along with student comments on course topics and ways of engaging with material concerning an understanding of gender and its effects on education and teaching. Student feedback on the course offering, its assignments, and the classroom atmosphere are highlighted. Conclusions settle on the need for a strong commitment of the university administration, a qualified course instructor, and a connection of pre-service teachers to the complexities of gender in educational contexts.

Allyson Jule, PhD, is Professor of Education and Co-Director of the Gender Studies Institute at Trinity Western University in Langley, BC. She is the author of A Beginner’s Guide to Language and Gender and Gender, Participation and Silence in the Language Classroom: Sh-shushing the Girls and the editor and co-editor of four collections of sociolinguistic scholarship: Gender and the Language of Religion, Language and Religious Identity, Shifting Visions: Gender and Discourse and her most recent book, Facing Challenges: Feminism in Christian Higher Education and Other Places (2015).

Developing foreign language knowledge and skills from watching captioned TV and DVDs: Theoretical and practical issues arising from the EURECAP Project

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23 February 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr. Robert Vanderplank, Department of Education

An Applied Linguistics Lunchtime Seminar convened by: Dr Jess Briggs

There is substantial evidence of the benefits in terms of enhanced comprehension and vocabulary acquisition for foreign language learners watching TV programmes and films with same language subtitles provided for the deaf and hard-of-hearing (e.g., Montero-Perez et al. 2013; Vanderplank, 2010, 2015, 2016). Most of this evidence comes from research with English language learners as TV programmes have carried these subtitles since the 1970s in the UK and North America (closed captions in the US). What has still hardly been addressed even after 30+ years of research is the question of whether learner-viewers may develop their language knowledge and skills over time through watching captioned programmes and DVDs and what the strategies and mechanisms are for this to happen.

The EURECAP Project at the Language Centre at Oxford has been exploring the benefits of watching films on DVD with same language subtitles in French, German, Italian and Spanish. Modern languages students and non-specialist language learners could borrow and watch a selection of DVDs in each language in their own time and kept diaries of their experiences and changes in behaviour over a five-to-six week period. In this presentation, I shall outline the aims of the project, the key findings and how these have helped to develop a complex model of language learning through watching films and programmes with these same language subtitles.

The sociolinguistic and pedagogic implications of the spread of English as global language (Public Seminar)

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22 February 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Heath Rose, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Harry Daniels, Director of Research

The spread of English from the language of an island nation to today’s global lingua franca has clear ramifications for society, and for English language education. This presentation aims to provide an overview of research emerging from the field of Global Englishes, which is a growing research paradigm that aims to embrace issues surrounding the diversification and use of the English language. Global Englishes incorporates World Englishes and English as a lingua franca research—both of which have implications for society and pedagogy. World Englishes research (e.g. Kachru et al. 2009), the study of variation in English in geographical regions around the world, has been instrumental in widening our understanding of variation and change in language and challenging the notion of ‘standard’ English. English as a lingua franca research (e.g. Seidlhofer 2011), which examines how English is used within and across linguistic communities, has been instrumental in showcasing current uses of English as a contact language in a range of fluid contexts. This presentation aims to first explore the impact on society of the spread of English as a global language. It will then outline the implications of this spread on societal attitudes towards variation in the English language. Finally, it will summarize recent proposals (e.g. Galloway & Rose 2015) to make the English classroom more relevant to learners who are likely to use English in global contexts.

Heath Rose is a specialist in language teacher training. He is the current course leader for the MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching English Language in University Settings, and also lectures on the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching. He has taught for nearly two decades, starting in Australian schools, before moving into higher education at The University of Sydney and then to Japan at Rikkyo University, and Tohoku University.

He holds a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (a secondary school teaching qualification) from The University of Queensland.

Prevalence and stability of concentration at KS2 before and after physical activity

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22 February 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Chris Heemskerk, University of Oxford

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Data from two schools was analysed using State Space Grids (SSG). Intrapersonal comparisons were made of prevalence and stability of concentration before and after physical activity (PA), in the context of the play-deprivation theory. The intrapersonal differences after unstructured PA (break time) were compared to those after teacher-led PA (Physical Education lessons). It was found that, within the present sample, prevalence of concentration had a positive relationship with PA, a stronger relationship was found for Physical Education (PE), especially when taught by subject specialists (r=0.86), than break (r=0.19). Stability of concentration had a negative relationship with PA, more strongly for break (r=0.78) than PE (r=0.43).

Non-political elite interviewing: methodology in the technical age

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18 February 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Jaimie Miller-Friedmann , DPhil student, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

This seminar will introduce a novel methodology for interviewing non-political elite subjects, including recruitment, preparation for interviewing, and subsequent approaches to successfully breaking through the subjects' 'media' barriers. This methodology was devised for thesis fieldwork, and preliminary results as well as obstacles will be discussed.

Stories from Facebook

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17 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Eve Stirling, Sheffield Hallam University

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group

Abstract:

Within the range of websites and apps that are part of first-year undergraduates’ digital environments, the social network site Facebook is perhaps the most popular and prominent. As such, the ubiquitous nature of Facebook in the higher education landscape has drawn much attention from scholars. Drawing on data from a longitudinal connective ethnography, this paper uses two ethnographic stories to explore further the realities of social media usage by newly enrolled undergraduate students in a UK university. These ethnographic stories tell two differing tales – one of connection, intent, use and organisation – the other, of disconnection, disengagement and unrealised expectations. Facebook structures students’ time at university both through connection and disconnection practices and examples of these are presented under two headings ‘I’m always on it’ and ‘Being academic’. First-year student experiences of Higher Education and social media use are not uniform, but nuanced and responsive to their specific ecosocial systems.

Eve Stirling is a Senior Lecturer in Design at Sheffield Institute of Art at Sheffield Hallam University. Her research interests include the use of social media within society and more specifically within higher education and the pedagogical impacts of this. She is also interested in design thinking and its influence on the research process, ethnographic research methods and social media as a research tool and research site. She uses practice based and visual research methods to explore the everyday lives of her participants. She gained her PhD from the School of Education at the University of Sheffield and in this took a longitudinal ethnographic approach studying Facebook use by students in transition. She is interested in the proliferation of digital spaces within our everyday lives and the relationship between time and space within these.

Mathematical reasoning and achievement: a causal connection

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17 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Peter Bryant, Deborah Evans,  Rossana Barros, Sue Baker and Professor Terezinha Nunes, Department of Education,

Convener: Professor Terezinha Nunes for the Children Learning and Families, Effective Learning and Literacy (FELL) Research Groups

The pedagogical potential and limits of English Medium Instruction in Japanese English-as-a-Foreign-Language classrooms

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16 February 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr. Kazuya Saito, Birkbeck, University of London

An Applied Linguistics Lunchtime Seminar convened by: Dr Jess Briggs

Although the role of decontextualized language-focused instruction remains unclear, especially for the development of spontaneous speech production, a growing number of researchers have conceptualized, elaborated and validated a range of meaning-oriented and acquisition-rich L2 teaching approaches. One such example concerns English Medium Instruction (EMI), whereby students are required to take content-based classes in the target language together with foreign language or language art classes.

In this talk, I will report a longitudinal project which delved into the extent to which college-level Japanese learners of English can improve the global (comprehensibility and accentedness) as well as specific (pronunciation, fluency, vocabulary and grammar) qualities of L2 spontaneous speech over one academic year in EMI classrooms. Subsequently, I will also relate to how the level of proficiency achieved was related to the length (1 semester vs. 1 year) and focus (language-focused vs. content-based classes) of instruction that students had received as well as their language aptitude profiles (explicit and implicit pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar).

The findings will be discussed in terms of the pedagogical “potential” and “limits” of EMI programs of this kind. I will provide some promising directions for future research.

Silence in Japan’s second language classrooms: the dynamic interplay between context and learners (Public Seminar)

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15 February 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Jim King, University of Leicester

Convener: Dr Jessica Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Silence is an area of study that receives relatively little attention from second language (L2) researchers, who in the past have tended to concentrate more on the spoken aspects of discourse within classrooms. Far from being merely communicative voids in which nothing of interest happen, moments of silence during educational encounters are actually rich in form, function and meaning. This talk will report on a large-scale, multi-site investigation into the silent behaviour of L2 learners attending English classes within Japanese universities. Using a complexity perspective as its conceptual background, the investigation moves away from traditional, reductionist, single-cause explanations for learner reticence to suggest that silence actually emerges through multiple, concurrent routes. These routes are so abundant, and appear to be so well supported both educationally and culturally in the Japanese context, that silence appears to have fossilised into a semi-permanent attractor state within university language classrooms.

Jim King is Lecturer in Education within the University of Leicester’s School of Education. Before gaining a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the University of Nottingham, he taught in various countries around the world, including stints in Poland, Hungary, Italy, Japan and Australia. A post-doctoral fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Jim’s research interests centre on the issues of silence in educational contexts and psychological aspects of second language learning. His publications include the monograph Silence in the second language classroom (2013) and the edited volume The dynamic interplay between context and the language learner (2015), both published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Poverty and children's vocabulary development in Ethiopia: the effects of poverty timing, duration and transition

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15 February 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Nardos Tesfay, University of Oxford

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

This DPhil study examines patterns of children’s vocabulary development in Ethiopia in relation to the children’s poverty contexts, drawing on the Young Lives prospective longitudinal study of 3,000 children who are followed over a fifteen year period (2002-2013).  The overall aim of the research is to better understand differential patterns of children’s vocabulary growth over time, the influence of poverty on developmental trajectories and moderated effects of the poverty-growth relationship.  The current discussion focuses on the empirical findings of the first two stages of analysis.  The first relates to the statistical validation of the assessment instrument as applied in the multilingual Ethiopian context.  The second examines trends in vocabulary development and the effects of poverty on development, exploring notions of poverty timing, duration, intensity and transitions.

Executive function: social influences and links with school readiness

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10 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Professor Claire Hughes Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge

Convener: Professor Terezinha Nunes for the Children Learning and Families, Effective Learning and Literacy (FELL) Research Groups

OSAT Reading Group

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10 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room C

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels Reading: Engeström, Y., Kajamaa, A., & Nummijoki, J. (2015). Double stimulation in everyday work: Critical encounters between home care workers and their elderly clients. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, 4, 48–61.

Comprehension strategies used by Hong Kong ESL learners when listening to the teacher in the classroom

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09 February 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Daniel Fung, Department of Education

An Applied Linguistics Lunchtime Seminar convened by: Dr Jess Briggs

Social and emotional early development: a programme to develop children’s social skills and help prevent bullying (Public Seminar)

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08 February 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Daniel Muijs, University of Southampton

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub

While dealing with bullying when it occurs in schools is extremely important, we are increasingly finding that prevention is better than cure. Ensuring that schools create a culture in which all pupils develop empathy and social skills, especially among so-called ‘bystanders’ (those pupils who are neither the bully or the bullied but whose behaviour can strongly influence both) may therefore help to prevent future bullying behaviours.

The Social and Emotional Early Development (SEED) programme was developed as an intervention to improve the social and emotional skills of primary school age children and build their resilience and empathy, resulting in more positive social interactions. The programme is based on principles of social and emotional learning, teaching thinking skills and gamification, and consists of ten discreet activities which encourage reflection through collaborative group work, prompted by a scenario depicted through a cartoon.

In this presentation we will present the programme which was initially run in three local authorities in England, and look at its impact on pupils’ behaviours and personal and social development. To do this we used a quasi-experimental design in which schools were randomly assigned to receive the intervention at different times.

Daniel Muijs is Professor of Education at the University of Southampton. He is an acknowledged expert in the fields of school and teacher effectiveness, leadership, and quantitative research methods and is co-editor of the journal ‘School Effectiveness and School Improvement’. He has published widely in the areas of teacher and school effectiveness and improvement, educational leadership and research methods, and has a strong interest in the relationship between research, policy and practise.

He holds a PhD in Social Sciences from the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium), and MSc in Managerial Economic (Catholic University of Leuven) and a BA in Communication Sciences (Catholic University of Leuven).

An introduction to Item Response Theory and application to practise gradings in health education

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08 February 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Daniel MuijsUniversity of Southampton

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Item response theory represents a major breakthrough in measurement theory. Conceptualising items as indicators of underlying traits, item response models have a number of highly desirable measurement properties, including the ability to separate item and sample characteristics and do non-parallel test equating. In this seminar we will introduce key concepts and background of IR and, look at different IRT models, such as the Rasch model. Finally we will present an application of IRT modelling to the grading of practise experiences of nursing students to help develop an understanding of the uses, advantages and disadvantages of IRT models in real-world contexts.

Moving in and out of contexts in collaborative reasoning about equations

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04 February 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Cecilia Kilhamn, Department of Pedagogical, Curricular and Professional Studies, Gothenburg University

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Abstract

I will talk about the VIDEOMAT project in general and specifically show results from one of our most recent studies that have come out of the project: a study of small-group problem-solving in algebra. An in-depth analysis showed that the pupils readily translated a given equation into a context where they could use a previously experienced manipulative model. This translation allowed them to find the correct numeric value of x in the equation but it did not help them solve the word problem. The results highlight the importance of giving pupils opportunities to realize the particular position of symbolic mathematical representations when dealing with mathematical concepts.

VIDEOMAT - Hidden dimensions of teaching/learning in mathematics: The contribution of video studies to comparative analysis and the development of instruction.

Mathematics Education Reading Group

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04 February 2016 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room C

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group

Readings:

Rowland, T., Thwaites, A. & Jared, L. (2015).  Triggers of contingency in mathematics teaching.  Research in Mathematics Education 17(2), 74-91, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14794802.2015.1018931

Herbel-Eisenmann, B. A., Wagner, D., Johnson, K. R., Suh, H. & Figueras, H. (2015).  Positioning in mathematics education: revelations on an imported theory.  Educational Studies in Mathematics, 89(2), 185-204.  http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10649-014-9588-5 

Reading culture through online archives: education, classical music and the British ‘mediaocracy’

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04 February 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Alexi Vellianitis, DPhil student, Faculty of Music

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

That classical music has educational and disciplinary benefits for young people is a long-standing cliché that has been repeatedly drawn upon in press discussion of the contemporary music scene in Britain. This is particularly the case in the last decade, marked as it has been by youth protest: David Cameron’s increased focus on aspiration and discipline in the wake of the UK 2011 riots inadvertently made a great endorsement of classical music.

In looking at the press discourse on classical music and children over the past ten years this paper makes a methodological point. In The Establishment (2014), Owen Jones describes Britain as a ‘mediaocracy’, reflecting the power the press has in conditioning public thought by directing criticism at minorities and disadvantaged social groups. Since newspapers and magazines are now increasingly available in digital format, this paper also discusses the process, the pros and cons, of working with online archives.

Inferentialism, knowledge and technology

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03 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Professor Jan Derry, Institute of Education, UCL

Conveners: Dr Niall Winters and Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group

Abstract

This talk is concerned with the human dimension of technology-enhanced learning; many suppositions are made about this but the amount of attention it has been given relative to that paid to technology is quite limited. I will argue that an aspect of the question that deserves more attention than it has received in the work on the application of technologies to education is epistemology on the grounds that the nature of knowledge and the general character of mind are critically important.

I will introduce recent philosophical work concerned with Inferentialism and its connection to the work of Vygotsky. I will argue that Inferentialism offers rich theoretical resources for reconsidering challenges and issues that arise in education. Inferentialism is a theory of meaning which attends to, what is a distinctively human characteristic, our capacity to let one thing stand for another.  Key to Inferentialism is the privileging of the inferential over the representational in an account of meaning; and of direct concern here is the theoretical relevance of this to the process by which learners gain knowledge. Inferentialism requires that the correct application of a concept is to be understood in terms of inferential articulation, simply put, understanding it as having meaning only as part of a set of related concepts.  It is argued that the implication of these ideas for education differ radically from the pedagogic models that underpin much work on technology-enhanced learning where the suppositions about experience are quite different. Indeed the nature of knowledge is usually presumed rather than examined and often what is taken for granted is awareness as a conceptually unmediated response to the world.

Jan Derry is Professor of Philosophy of Education at the UCL Institute of Education, University College London. Her research interests focus on philosophical psychology, the post-Vygotskian research field and its implications for theories of mind and activity. She has taught in the post-16 sector and worked in Teacher Education before developing her research in Philosophy of Education. She led the European funded Philosophy of Technology-enhanced Learning Special Interest Group for the Kaleidoscope Network of Excellence, while based at the London Knowledge Lab. She is currently working on the application of the semantic theory of Inferentialism to the teaching of probability, a research project funded by the Swedish National Research Agency. Her book Vygotsky, Philosophy and Education, (2013) continues her work addressing the connection between epistemology and pedagogy. Other recent publications are: ‘Can Inferentialism contribute to Social Epistemology?’ in Education and the Growth of Knowledge: Perspectives from social and virtue epistemology, (ed.) Kotzee, B. (2013); ‘Lessons from inferentialism for statistics education’ with Arthur Bakker, in Mathematical Thinking and Learning (2011) and ‘Abstract Rationality in Education: from Vygotsky to Brandom’ in Knowledge, Expertise and the Professions, (eds.) Young, M. and Muller, J. (2014).

Teaching Chinese as a foreign language: an intervention study on the Chinese writing system

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03 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Philea Chim, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Terezinha Nunes for the Children Learning and Families, Effective Learning and Literacy (FELL) Research Groups

Assessing virtue: measuring moral education at home and abroad

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02 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Professor Hanan Alexander, Haifa University

Conveners: Dr Alis Oancea and Dr Lorraine Forman-Peck, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum/Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

How should programs dedicated to education in virtue be assessed? One influential answer argues that if we can measure which inputs and processes produce the highest levels of virtue among participants according to some reasonable criterion, we will be able to determine which sorts of programs engender the most desired results. Although many outcomes of character education can be assessed in this way, taken on its own, this approach may support favorable judgments about programs that indoctrinate rather than educate; education in character entails teleological thinking to generate new norms, not merely reproduce old ones.  I argue instead that assessment of these programs requires an expansive view of character education in both particular and common goods that avoids the tendency to indoctrinate, moral education at home and abroad, and an inclusive conception of measurement that takes into account qualitative in addition to quantitative methodologies.

Hanan Alexander is Dean of Students and Professor of Philosophy of Education at the University of Haifa, where he heads the International School and the Center for Jewish Education.  A past head of Haifa's Department of Education, he is also a Senior Research Fellow in the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. His research interests include political, moral, spiritual, religious, and Jewish education and the philosophy of social research.

Educated at UCLA, Stanford, and the Jewish Theological Seminary, Alexander has taught philosophy and educational studies at the American Jewish University, where he was Academic Vice President; UCLA; the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley; the Jewish Theological Seminary, New York; and Bar Ilan University, Israel.  He also served as Editor of the journal Religious Education, Richard and Rhoda Goldman Visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and Visiting Fellow at St. Edmund's College and the Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge, UK.

Alexander has published more than 125 essays in various academic and professional venues, a number of which have been translated into German, Dutch, Chinese, and Hebrew. His books include Reclaiming Goodness: Education and the Spiritual Quest (University of Notre Dame Press, 2001), which won a 2002  National Jewish Book Award, Ethics and Spirituality in Education: Philosophical, Theological, and Radical Perspectives (Sussex, 2004), Citizenship Education and Social Conflict: Israeli Political Education in Global Perspective, with Halleli Pinson and Yossi Yonah (Routledge, 2011) and Commitment, Character, and Citizenship: Religious Schooling in Liberal Democracy, with Ayman Agbaria (Routledge, 2012).  His new book, Reimagining Liberal Education: Affiliation and Inquiry in Democratic Schooling, which was published by Bloomsbury in 2015, was recently nominated for a National Jewish Book Award.

Reimagining liberal education: affiliation and inquiry in democratic schooling (Public Seminar)

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01 February 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Hanan Alexander, Haifa University

Conveners: Dr Alis Oancea and Dr Lorraine Foreman-Peck, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Form/Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

Drawing on my new book Reimagining Liberal Education, I argue in this talk for a form of education in open, diverse, liberal democracies that eschews neutrality.  Instead, educators need to enable students to embark on a quest for intelligent spirituality grounded in thick traditions with roots in strong transcendent values, while paying heed to pedagogies of difference that engage a variety of alternative perspectives in dialogue. To understand one's self requires engaging those whose views are different from one's own. But to genuinely encounter difference one must also acquire a deep understanding of the traditions to which one is heir or with which one chooses to affiliate. This philosophical position offers an account of school curriculum and moral and religious instruction that throws new light on the possibilities of a nuanced, rounded education for citizenship devoted to a modus vivendi for living together across deep difference in peace.

Hanan Alexander is Dean of Students and Professor of Philosophy of Education at the University of Haifa, where he heads the International School and the Center for Jewish Education.  A past head of Haifa's Department of Education, he is also a Senior Research Fellow in the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. His research interests include political, moral, spiritual, religious, and Jewish education and the philosophy of social research.

Educated at UCLA, Stanford, and the Jewish Theological Seminary, Alexander has taught philosophy and educational studies at the American Jewish University, where he was Academic Vice President; UCLA; the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley; the Jewish Theological Seminary, New York; and Bar Ilan University, Israel.  He also served as Editor of the journal Religious Education, Richard and Rhoda Goldman Visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and Visiting Fellow at St. Edmund's College and the Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge, UK.

Alexander has published more than 125 essays in various academic and professional venues, a number of which have been translated into German, Dutch, Chinese, and Hebrew. His books include Reclaiming Goodness: Education and the Spiritual Quest (University of Notre Dame Press, 2001), which won a 2002  National Jewish Book Award, Ethics and Spirituality in Education: Philosophical, Theological, and Radical Perspectives (Sussex, 2004), Citizenship Education and Social Conflict: Israeli Political Education in Global Perspective, with Halleli Pinson and Yossi Yonah (Routledge, 2011) and Commitment, Character, and Citizenship: Religious Schooling in Liberal Democracy, with Ayman Agbaria (Routledge, 2012).  His new book, Reimagining Liberal Education: Affiliation and Inquiry in Democratic Schooling, which was published by Bloomsbury in 2015, was recently nominated for a National Jewish Book Award.

Trinity Access 21 (TA21): a large scale project in educational transformation

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01 February 2016 14:00 - 15:00
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Professor Brendan Tangney, Trinity College Dublin

Conveners: Dr Rebecca Eynon and Dr Niall Winters, Learning and New Technologies Research Group

TA21 is the umbrella title for a suite of co-ordinated, design based research projects, which are addressing a number of overlapping pressures on Irish second level education.

Firstly progression to 3rd level education, and all the benefits which flow from it, is still largely the preserve of the well off. There are a myriad of complex reasons for this to do with culture and teaching practices in schools but the deficit in “social capital” in areas of disadvantage remains a major obstacle to be overcome in efforts to address the imbalance. The policy shift towards 21st century teaching & learning, as typified by the European Commission’s Improving Competences for the 21st Century (EU Commission 2008) which is manifesting in a reform of the Junior Cycle (ages 12-16) in Irish Schools , requires a re-examination of current approaches to teaching & learning if students are to develop the key skills which lie at the core of 21C approaches. Finally the potential of ICT to enhance teaching & learning remains largely untapped in school systems, such as the Irish one, which rely predominantly on a transmission model of teaching & learning.

This talk will give an overview of different strands of the TA21 project including: 3 practices, derived from the USA NGO “College for Every Student”, in the areas of student mentoring, developing leadership skills and career planning; Bridge21, a model of team based technology mediated learning for use in the classroom; an approach to teacher professional development and an overarching longitudinal research study to track progression of 1,000 students and 250 teachers over the lifetime of the project.

Brendan Tangney is an Associate Professor in Computer Science in  Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin.  He is co-director of Trinity’s Centre for Research in IT in Education (a joint initiative between the School of Education and  the School of Computer Science & Statistics) and has held visiting positions in the Universities of Sydney and Kyoto.  He is academic director of Trinity’s Bridge21 project and is a  member of the Editorial Boards of  Computers & Education and the AACE Journal of Computers in Mathematics &  Science Teaching.

Correcting for omitted ability bias in teacher effects on student performance

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01 February 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Daniel Caro, University of Oxford

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Observed associations in international assessments between teaching strategies and student performance are potentially affected by omitted ability bias, given the lack of prior achievement measures in the cross-sectional data. For example, reported negative associations with student oriented strategies are against expectations and may actually reflect that students receive greater support as a result of low performance and not that these strategies produce lower performance. This study evaluates this assumption with prior achievement data available for students in England participating in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS). Associations between reading performance and a number of teaching strategies are adjusted for prior reading performance. Having calculated the size and sources of omitted ability bias in England, different scenarios are postulated for the bias across education systems. As a result, associations between reading performance and teaching strategies are adjusted across education systems as if prior achievement were observed. Potentials and limitations of this approach for studying educational effectiveness with international assessment data are discussed.

How can education research influence policy practice?

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28 January 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers/Panel members: 

Tom Mcbride, Head of Strategic Analysis, UK Department for Education

Alex Scharaschkin, Director of Research, AQA; Director, AQA Centre for Education Research and Practice

Ewart Keep, Director, Oxford University Centre on Skills, Knowledge & Organisational Performance (SKOPE)

Convener: Jo Thiel, Oxford Students Higher Education Research Group in association with SKOPE

As researchers, we aim to develop knowledge that will improve the human condition. This goal is hampered, however, if research is not consumed, interrogated, and used by those implementing policy. How then does research enter the policy process in practice?

This panel brings together decades of experience working at the intersection of education research and policy and will attempt to answer this key question. Drawing from their considerable experience, the panellists will describe their view of how research informs policy, and share perspectives on how researchers can better communicate and interact with policy makers and what researchers typically miss when thinking about how policy is made.

Concepts as analytic tools

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28 January 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Professor Anne Edwards

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

All too often theories are seen a frameworks that constrain research studies. In this session Anne Edwards suggests that they should be seen as offering analytic tool boxes that open up complexity and allow researchers to communicate clearly. The argument is that the concepts that constitute theories can be resources employed to design a study, dig into data and make general points from qualitative work. The session will cover how concepts can be used as tools shaping the research questions, designing the study, selecting research methods, analysing data (the focus will be here) and presenting findings. Anne will draw primarily on examples of DPhil studies using cultural-historical theory (Vygotskian theory and its legacies), but the points to be made will have much wider relevance.

The impact of children's centres on children, parents, and parenting

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27 January 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speakers: Professor Pam Sammons and Dr James Hall, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Terezinha Nunes for the Children Learning and Families, Effective Learning and Literacy (FELL) Research Groups

Education, Ethics and Experience. Essays in honour of Richard Pring

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26 January 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Forum, in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

Speakers:
Professor David Carr, University of Birmingham
Dr Alis Oancea, Department of Education
Dr Judith Suissa, Institute of Education, University of London
Professor James Tooley, University of Newcastle

Response:
Professor Richard Pring, Department of Education

The launch of Education, Ethics and Experience. Essays in honour of Richard Pring, edited by Michael Hand and Richard Davies, will be followed by a wine reception at 6.30 pm. All welcome.

Please register at http://www.etouches.com/145922

Download an invitation to the event
Download a flyer for the book

Thanks to the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain and the University of Oxford Department of Education for co-sponsoring this event

Applied Linguistics Lunchtime Seminar

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26 January 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: To be announced

Applied Linguistics Lunchtime Seminar convened by: Dr Jess Briggs

Clever classrooms: evidence for the impacts of classroom design on learning (Public Seminar)

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25 January 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Harry Daniels. Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT)

Abstract:

Based on an empirical study of 3766 primary school pupils and the 153 classrooms they occupied the EPSRC-funded HEAD (Holistic Evidence and Design Project has successfully isolated the impact of design features on the learning progress of those pupils over a year.  This was based on multi-disciplinary collaboration over several years that resulted in a radical new conceptual model of the holistic physical learning environment, taken from a child’s sensory perspective. This increased scope of consideration was then twinned with multilevel modelling of the data to identify the classroom level impacts. These model out at explaining 16% of the overall variation in the learning progress of the pupils in the spaces studied. The findings support detailed practical suggestions for teachers, designers and policy-makers. There are surprises in relation to some aspects that do not appear. Sub-analyses of the data are being carried out and raise interesting issues around subject-specific design and design for particular groupings of pupils.

About the speaker:

Professor Barrett is Professor of Management in Property and Construction at Salford University in the UK. Peter is a past President of the UN-established International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction (CIB). He is a member of the High Level Group of the European Construction Technology Platform and its UK equivalent. He is the Director for Research for Salford University’s Institute for Dementia and an international advisor to the OECD and the US-based Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture.

Peter has produced over one hundred and seventy single volume publications, refereed papers and reports, and has made over one hundred and ten presentations in around sixteen countries. Professor Barrett has undertaken a wide range of research.

He is currently focusing on the theme of Senses, Brain and Spaces with a particular interest in the area of primary school design and achieving optimal learning spaces. The findings of this work have, for the first time, isolated a significant influence of “Clever Classrooms” on variations in pupils’ learning. This has directly influenced, for example, the UK Department for Education, the US Green Building Council and the Norwegian Education Directorate.

Static and dynamic techniques for analysing teacher gaze in the real-world

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25 January 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Nora MacIntyre, University of York

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

In this seminar, two real-world studies will be outlined with eye-tracking analyses in mind.  In the first study, expert teacher gaze for each, attention and communication, were explored across two cultural settings.  Gaze was analysed through simultaneous and retrospective verbalisations, using static and dynamic techniques.  Retrospective verbalisations are a well-accepted approach to interpreting gaze data: an example of such analysis will be demonstrated.  Simultaneous verbalisations form the basis for the remaining gaze analyses.  Static analyses involved gaze counts and gaze durations; dynamic analyses involved state space grids and scanpaths.  In the second study, teachers’ reactivity to observational classroom research was explored.  Gaze analysis employed both static and dynamic techniques again.  Static analyses were pre-/post-test comparisons of reactivity-driven gaze; the dynamic technique was interrupted time series analysis.  Through the seminar, it will become clear that both static and dynamic techniques are needed to truly tackle questions regarding teacher gaze in the real-world.

A generation of radical change: stories from the field - THIS EVENT IS POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

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21 January 2016 17:00 - 19:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Richard Pring (formerly Director, Oxford Dept. of Educational Studies) and Martin Roberts (formerly head of Cherwell School, Oxford)

Please join us at the launch of this book which we co-edited and which was recently published by Routledge. 12 experts in their fields reflect on the great changes which occurred in eduction policy-making between 1976, the year of Prime Minister Callaghan's Ruskin speech, and today. Our contributors cover a wide range, from early years to FE and HE, from the DfE and Ofsted to LEAs, and also has chapters on Assessment and the Media.

Contributors are Lord Baker, Martin Roberts, Wendy Scott, Tony Eaude, Kenny Frederick, Richard Pring, Geoff Stanton, Tim Oates, Pat O'Shea, Sir Tim Brighouse, Margaret Maden, Sir Peter Newsam and Peter Wilby.

Baroness Estelle Morris of Yardley wrote the Foreword:

Although change will be an ever present force for those who work in education, we must get better at how we lead it, manage it, evaluate it and take others on the journey. This book is not only a testament to the past but also a most valuable source of wisdom for the future. We should all learn from it.

Download the flyer

Ex-cons and future cops: using qualitative DPhil research to effect change in New York's criminal justice system

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21 January 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Speaker: Dr Lila McDowell, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York City

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Can our DPhil research inform more than books and publications? Can it inspire and direct action? I began asking myself these questions in 2012, after completing a DPhil on the ways that men incarcerated in a New York prison used higher education to make sense of their experiences and move forward with their lives. In this seminar I will reflect on the answers I found: how I drew on my DPhil research in my work first as a prisoner reentry case manager in East Harlem, then as a teacher of criminal justice students, and finally as part of a research institute bringing higher education programs back to American prisons. I discovered that not only did the findings of my DPhil project inform my experiences in the field, but also that my understanding of my own project's findings continued to evolve through the lens of those experiences.

Lila McDowell completed her DPhil at OUDE in 2012 and currently works at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, NYC.

"'They gave you a PhD for THIS?" Research participants' reactions to a DPhil thesis on the impact of higher education in prison.

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20 January 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room C

Speaker: Dr Lila McDowell, John Jay College of Criminal Justice Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, OSAT

This presentation will examine research participants' reactions to a DPhil thesis based on six months of ethnographic observation and five months of autobiographical writing workshops with men pursuing Bachelor's degrees while incarcerated in New York. Given the opportunity to read the finished product, several of the men shared their thoughts on the study's analysis and conclusions, both through letters and across visiting room tables. Their responses offer new insights into the ways that the men made meaning of their experiences, including the experience of participating in the study, as well as shed light on their evolving identities as writers, students, and educators.

IFSTAL: Multi-university post-graduate teaching and learning

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20 January 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room E

Speakers: Dr John Ingram, IFSTAL Programme Leader and Food Systems Programme Leader, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford and Dr Rebecca White, Oxford IFSTAL Education Coordinator, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

Conveners: Dr Niall Winters and Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group

The ‘Innovative Food Systems Teaching and Learning Programme’ (IFSTAL) is a multi-university, interactive training programme designed to improve post-graduate level knowledge and understanding of the food system. IFSTAL brings together expertise and experience of faculty and students from five leading higher education institutions. Its approach presents an opportunity for collaborative academic pedagogical research in multi- institutions teaching.

IFSTAL’s goal is to create a cohort of Masters and PhD graduates equipped to address food systems challenges by framing their specialist understanding gained through their degrees within the broader social, economic and environmental contexts.

To this end, IFSTAL offers students interdisciplinary learning based on (i) a core lecture series and exposure to cutting edge ‘food systems’ thinking; (ii) access to a network of faculty and fellow students across institutions; (iii) opportunities to participate in activities/workshops; and (iv) contact with experts from the workplace. A VLE (https://vle.ifstal.ac.uk/) is central to student engagement and interaction.

IFSTAL is voluntary, and does not impinge on student contact time. It is not assessed but sits alongside and supports postgraduate learning and research.

Over 300 students across the five institutions are already participating in IFSTAL.

The conceptual understanding of evolution of primary school teachers and year 5/6 children

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20 January 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Jennifer McGowan-Smyth, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Terezinha Nunes for the Children Learning and Families, Effective Learning and Literacy (FELL) Research Groups

Educational philosophy for a postsecular age

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19 January 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr David  Lewin, Strathclyde University

Conveners: Dr Alis Oancea and Dr Lorraine Foreman-Peck, Philosophy, Religion and Education Research Forum/Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

Abstract

What does education look like in a post-secular age? What philosophical and pedagogical issues are raised by the new context of the post-secular? In this presentation I explore the varied conceptions of secularism and the post-secular, arguing that the post-secular complicates rather than overturns the so-called secularization thesis. The argument advances a view of religion and belief that challenges the idea that religion is basically reducible to doctrines, creeds or truth claims. The point here is to show that the ‘problem’ of religion and education is not best understood as a problem of competing and irreconcilable worldviews. The post-secular announces a shift in the debates within religion and education away from questions around, for example, indoctrination versus autonomy, or forms of relativism versus forms of realism. The post-secular presents a fresh opportunity to reflect on the formative nature of education.

Dr David Lewin is Lecturer in Education at Strathclyde University. His research interests focus on the intersections between philosophy of education, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of technology. He has published articles on wide-ranging topics such as contemplation, attention, hermeneutics, and digital pedagogy. He is the author of Technology and the Philosophy of Religion (Cambridge Scholars 2011) and has co-edited (with Todd Mei) From Ricoeur to Action: the Socio-Political Significance of Ricoeur’s Thinking (Continuum 2012) and (with Alexandre Guilherme and Morgan White) New Perspectives in Philosophy of Education (Bloomsbury 2014). He is currently working on a monograph entitled Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age (Routledge 2016).

Using eye-tracking in incidental vocabulary acquisition research

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19 January 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Seminar Room K/L

Speaker: Dr. Ana Pellicer-Sánchez, University of Nottingham

An Applied Linguistics Lunchtime Seminar convened by: Dr Jess Briggs

Reading is an important source of first language (L1) and second language (L2) vocabulary learning. Previous studies have shown that new words can be learnt incidentally from reading (e.g. Brown, Waring, & Donkaewbua, 2008; Pellicer-Sánchez & Schmitt, 2010; Webb, 2007). Recent studies have also shown that different types of formulaic sequences and multi-word expressions can be learnt incidentally from reading (e.g. Pellicer-Sánchez, in press; Webb, Newton, & Chang, 2013). However, these previous studies used off-line measures in the form of post-reading tests. Although still informative of the quantity and quality of vocabulary learnt from reading, these measures do not tell us much about what happens when readers encounter unknown lexical items while reading. Using measures of eye movements we can now examine the online reading of unknown lexical items, both single words and multi-word expressions. The combination of off-line (vocabulary tests) and online (eye-tracking) measures provides a fuller account of the process of L1 and L2 reading, expanding our knowledge of the incidental learning of new lexical items from reading. This presentation will first introduce the eye-tracking technique and will then report results of recent experimental studies that used eye-tracking to examine the incidental acquisition of vocabulary knowledge from L1 and L2 reading and the online reading of unknown lexical items. Results of these studies will shed light on the relationship between vocabulary learning from reading and patterns of eye-movements.

Research into the links between language teacher development and working with children as co-researchers (Public Seminar)

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18 January 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Annamaria Pinter, University of Warwick

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Interview data conducted at regular intervals during the study has been analysed to make tentative links between working with children as co-researchers  and teachers’ professional development.

This talk will address children’s status in applied linguistics research more broadly,  and then discuss the conceptual and practical  issues around children as co-researchers/ researchers. The talk will also report on an ongoing study with Indian primary English teachers who have been working with children as co-researchers in their classrooms.

Annamaria Pinter trained as an English language teacher in Hungary at the Eötvös Lórand University in Budapest after studying linguistics and literature. She worked in Hungary for a number of years in a variety of contexts, including state primary and secondary schools, International House (IH) language schools and in a pre-service teacher training college, where she was involved in curriculum development for primary English language teachers. She completed her Masters and PhD in ELT/Applied Linguistics at the Centre for Applied Linguistics at Warwick and since 2000 she have been working at the same Centre full time, teaching on the Masters in ELT and the EdD programmes and supervising doctoral students. In addition to working with Warwick students, she has also worked with language teachers from a range of different countries (e.g. Russia, Poland, Japan, Thailand, Turkey) running short courses, workshops and consultancy projects.

She is the author of Teaching Young Language Learners Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers, Oxford University Press (2006) and Children Learning Second Languages, Palgrave Macmillan (2011). She is also an editor of an e-book series entitled Teaching English to Young Learners (http://www.candlinandmynard.com/series.html). She has published extensively in ELT/Applied Linguistics journals and has given numerous plenary talks on this subject worldwide.

Dr Pinter's research interests include second/foreign language acquisition and learning for children of all ages. She is interested in language learning processes in both formal and informal contexts, task-based learning, developing language learning materials for children and issues related to working with children and research subjects. Recently she has also become interested in processes of adjustment and adaptation in relation to children and their families living overseas on a temporary basis. Her other interest is language teacher development, in particular concerning experienced teachers and the connections between materials design and professional growth.

Exploring complex interventions through meta-analysis and qualitative comparative analysis

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18 January 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Dr Alison O’Mara, EPPI-Centre, Social Science Research Unit, UCL Institute of Education.

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Complex interventions are those that are made up of various interconnected components. Meta-analysis is an established method for drawing together the body of research on a particular intervention to determine whether the intervention ‘works’, but meta-analytic methodology is not always suited to the synthesis of complex interventions. This is because statistical meta-analysis, which is inherently based on correlations between variables, tests simultaneously for the ‘success’ and ‘failure’ of covariates and is therefore unable to identify the importance of the component ‘x’ in successful intervention A when it is also present in unsuccessful intervention B. (Testing for interaction is usually impossible in meta-analyses, because of a lack of data.) A promising alternative or complementary method of synthesising evidence on complex interventions is qualitative comparative analysis (QCA), which is underpinned by set theory. In this approach, the analyst identifies necessary and sufficient conditions for intervention success (or failure). Despite its name, it bridges qualitative and quantitative approaches and has numerical outputs. I will describe the basic analytical processes of both meta-analysis and QCA, present a worked example relating to community engagement in public health interventions, and conclude that both are useful analytical tools for evaluating different aspects of the ‘what works’ question.

Supporting the development of the profession: a clinical approach to teacher learning

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18 January 2016 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Larissa McLean Davies, Associate Professor, Melbourne Graduate School of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Abstract

The current focus on Teacher Education reflects governmental and societal recognition that teachers have the most significant in-school impact on student learning (Barber and Mourshed 2007; Hattie 2012; TMAG 2015). As a consequence of this, much greater attention, has been paid to the amount of time pre-service teachers spend in schools, leading to a ‘practicum turn’ in teacher education (Mattson  et al 2011) and an international focus on teaching as a clinical practice profession (Alter and Cogshall 2009; Burn and Mutton 2013; Conroy et al 2013; Dinham 2013; McLean Davies et al 2015).  While the intention of a clinical approach to teaching has been primarily to enhance the capacities of pre-service teachers, recent research shows the potential of this approach to extend beyond Initial Teacher Education, and impact on practices at both of the sites of learning—The University and the school/s involved.  Using the University of Melbourne’s Master of Teaching as a case study, this talk will examine the ways in which a clinical approach to teacher education can impact on learning and teaching in the broadest sense, and will explore the policy and practice implications of this for school leaders and other key stakeholders.

Associate Professor Larissa McLean Davies is Deputy Director, Learning and Teaching  in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education; in this role she has oversight of the pre-service Master of Teaching, and is currently managing the re-accreditation of this program  across 3 streams: Early Childhood, Primary and Secondary. In addition to this role, Larissa is Senior Researcher in the MGSE International Teacher Education Effectiveness Research Hub.  Larissa’s research and publications are in pre-service teacher preparation, clinical teaching, the teaching of literature and the secondary English curriculum; she is lead Chief Investigator on a  recently awarded Australian Research Council Discovery Grant ($805K AUS) to explore disciplinary knowledge in the making of English teachers (DP160101084).

Fulfilling our potential: teaching excellence, social mobility & student choice

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15 January 2016 14:00 - 16:00
Seminar Room A

A Green Paper panel discussion convened by Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education Research Group

Panel members:

David Gibson Director of Education Policy Support, University of Oxford

Becky Howe President of OUSU (Oxford University Student Union)

Terry Hoad President of UCU Oxford (University and College Union)

Bahram Bekhradnia President of HEPI (Higher Education Policy Institute)

Andrew Boggs Head of Policy of QAA (Quality Assurance Agency for HE)

Chair: Hubert Ertl Associate Professor of Higher Education, Oxford University

In November 2015 the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) green paper entitled ‘Fulfilling our Potential: Teaching Excellence, Social Mobility and Student Choice’ set out proposals for far-reaching changes to the higher education landscape. The proposals include the introduction of a Teaching Excellence Framework, the establishment of an Office for Students, and new initiatives to increase access and success in higher education for disadvantaged and under-represented groups.

The consultation on the green paper initiated by BIS has resulted in diverse responses to the proposals by the main stakeholders (universities, unions, student representatives, etc.). On the day the consultation period for the green paper ends, this event hosted by the Higher Education Research Group brings together a panel of stakeholder representatives to discuss some of these divergent views and to contribute to the wider debate on higher education reform in England.

Contact: hubert.ertl@education.ox.ac.uk, 01865 274044 for further information

Clever classrooms: evidence for the impacts of classroom design on learning (Public Seminar)

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15 December 2015 -

Speaker: Professor Peter Barrett, University of Salford

Convener: Professor Harry Daniels, OSAT

Philosophy, literature and education: devising a curriculum, defining a field

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14 December 2015 17:00 - 18:30

Conveners Emma Williams and Dr Liam Gearon, the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

Attendance at the seminar is by invitation only, please contact alis.oancea@education.ox.ac.uk

Lessons learned from scaling online college math readiness innovations

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08 December 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Joseph Thiel

Speaker Dr. John E. Cech, Deputy Commissioner of Higher Education, Montana University System  and Dr. John Matt, Department Chair, Educational Leadership, University of Montana

Abstract

The Montana University System (MUS) implemented the full statewide scaling of EdReady, a personalized college math readiness web-based intervention tool, during the 2015 academic year.  The goal of this intervention is to increase the percentage of first-time freshmen enrolling in and completing their first college-level math class. During autumn 2014, the state enrolled 1,704 postsecondary students receiving the EdReady treatment on five campuses (two and four year colleges).  The effects of EdReady were investigated using a three-part methodology, including a survey using a validated instrument to measure self-efficacy in mathematics students, comparisons of grades in the first college level course between treated and untreated students, and interviews with students, instructors and administrators.

Website: http://edreadymontana.org/

2014-15 FELL interns present their dissertations

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07 December 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Hannah Clifton "How is the effectiveness of the Incredible Years parental intervention influenced by the severity of child behavioural problems?"

Jake Argent "Anhedonia and Impulsivity: distinguishing between consummatory and anticipatory pleasure."

Interviewing elites

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03 December 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly and Dr Victoria Elliot, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Inequalities in reading performance and motivation: results from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study

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02 December 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Creating knowledge and enhancing change in organisations. A practice - based approach in a case study

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02 December 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate a case study of how an intervention carried out in an Italian company (on 197 employees) creates knowledge about employees’ dissatisfaction and enhances organisational change. The intervention is founded on a practice- based approach and, in particular, on an expansive learning cycle model conceptualised within the methodological framework of Activity Theory. In identifying areas of dissatisfaction, employees focused more on working daily processes rather than on material benefits. This study supports the hypothesis of the psychological function of work: people are interested in authoring their organisational reality. In relation to further implementation, this methodology could be a compass to guide the intervention focus about the employees’ dissatisfaction. The contribution presents an original procedure framework, borrowing its theoretical and methodological foundation from several contributions.

Technology and education : a role to play in achieving universal health coverage?

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02 December 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract: Primary care physicians and healthcare professionals can play a key leadership and coordination role within the healthcare team. To maintain competence and effectively treat their patients, doctors need to continuously learn about new and developing areas of their field. Globalisation has resulted in countries facing new health issues, and for many low and middle income countries this creates a double burden of existing communicable disease alongside growing prevalence of non-communicable diseases. It is therefore essential that primary care physicians, who are the first port of call for most patients and the ‘gatekeeper’ to the rest of the health system are trained sufficiently. Primary care physicians and healthcare professionals can play a key leadership and coordination role within the healthcare team. To maintain competence and effectively treat their patients, doctors need to continuously learn about new and developing areas of their field. Globalisation has resulted in countries facing new health issues, and for many low and middle income countries this creates a double burden of existing communicable disease alongside growing prevalence of non-communicable diseases. It is therefore essential that primary care physicians, who are the first port of call for most patients and the ‘gatekeeper’ to the rest of the health system are trained sufficiently. How can technology be used to accelerate and more effectively educate and train, support and ultimately increase the number of primary care physicians? What can we learn from what is already in place? And importantly, what impact does technology have on the role of primary care training and education with the aim of achieving Universal Health Coverage?  

Examining the impact of participation in study abroad with ERASMUS in the UK on students’ overall English language proficiency and common factors associated with differential linguistic gain

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01 December 2015 13:30 - 14:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

The educational progress of looked after children in England: linking care and educational data (Public seminar)

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30 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, Rees Centre for Research in Fostering and Education

Speakers:
Professor Judy Sebba, Dr Nikki Luke and Professor Steve Strand Professor David Berridge, University of Bristol

Respondent:  Emma Ing, Her Majesty’s Inspector (HMI) Ofsted

Abstract:
This study investigates the relationships between young people’s experiences in the care system and their educational achievements in secondary school. Using a mixed methods approach, we explored the relationship between educational outcomes, young people’s care histories and individual characteristics by linking the educational data collected annually in the National Pupil Database (NPD) and the care history data (SSDA903) for the cohort of children in care who completed exams in 2013. Outcomes for children with different characteristics and the relationships between outcomes and placement type and stability, school stability and length of time in care were explored. These statistical analyses were complemented by in-depth qualitative interviews with young people in six local authorities and with adults significant in their educational careers, to explore what might be done to improve the progress of secondary school pupils in care.

The presentation will cover the key factors that were associated with young people’s educational outcomes, including individual characteristics, early environment, and experiences in care and at school. We will also discuss the potential for the resulting evidence to inform policy and practice, as identifying the relationships between care experiences and educational progress will enable schools and services for children and young people to better support their education and improve outcomes.

A response will be provided by Emma Ing, Senior HMI Ofsted, East Midlands Region.

Copies of the overview report to be published on 30 November will be available on the day and three technical reports will be available on the Rees Centre, University of Bristol and Nuffield Foundation websites.

Sebba, J., Berridge, D., Luke, N., Fletcher, J., Bell, K., Strand, S., Thomas, S., Sinclair, I. and O’Higgins, A. (2015) The Educational Progress of Looked After Children in England. Oxford, Bristol and London: The Rees Centre, The University of Bristol and The Nuffield Foundation.

The Higher Education Access Tracker: national and institutional perspectives

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30 November 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education Research Group Abstract: The Higher Education Access Tracker (HEAT) is a service used to enable Higher Education Institutions across England to target, monitor and evaluate widening participation outreach programs, and to track student progression from school into Higher Education and beyond. Through the development of HEAT Hubs at specific universities, HEAT HEIs are able to share best practice and contribute to research in this area through collaborative networks. The following presentation aims to provide an overview of HEAT from a national and institutional perspective as witnessed through the University of Oxford HEAT Hub.

Investigating the effect of parental age on the health and development of children in a longitudinal cohort study

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30 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr James Hall Quantitative Methods Hub

Poetry Blues: ‘... beating it with a hose to find out what it really means.’

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26 November 2015 16:45 -
Seminar Room G/H

Convener: Dr Victoria Elliot, Forum for English Drama and Media in Education

Abstract:
Billy Collins’ poem ‘Introduction to Poetry’ has become well-known amongst English teachers and describes a syndrome that we can all recognise, especially in the light of the experience of recent GCSE English exams. This session aims to bring together consideration of issues about the way poetry is taught and examined at GCSE and A Level, and other phases, with some research evidence about student attitudes to and experiences of poetry, in order to open up a discussion of how we might best help students to ‘walk inside the poem’s room and feel the walls for a light switch.’

About the speaker:
Dr Gary Snapper is a teacher, writer and researcher. He is co-author of Teaching English Literature 16-19 (Routledge/NATE 2013) and of the course book for AQA English Literature A Level (CUP 2015). He is the editor of Teaching English, the professional journal of the National Association for the Teaching of English (NATE), as well as a teacher in a local school.

Experiences of 'Returnees' in Ghana

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26 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly and Dr Victoria Elliot, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Reading recovery: investigating differential effects on the literacy development of young children for whom English is an additional language in comparison with their native speaking peers

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25 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Comprehension strategies when listening to the teacher during ESL classroom interaction

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24 November 2015 13:30 - 14:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

The Education Endowment Foundation: challenges for the future (Public seminar)

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23 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Kathy Sylva,  Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Abstract:
This seminar will consider the emerging influence ‘disciplined innovation’ and the rise of randomized controlled trials in education. The Education endowment Foundation is supporting over 100 research studies involving 1:4 schools in England and over 700,000 pupils. Kevan will introduce the work of the EEF and share some of the emerging finding. He will position this work against the current context of the English education system and suggest that better access to high quality evidence will build capacity for development and support schools to improve outcomes for all pupils. Reflecting on the first four years of the EEF Kevan will set out the challenges for the next phase of its work focusing on the ambition to address social and emotional skills , learning and development in the early years and the wider use and adoption of evidence to inform practice.

About the speaker:
Kevan has worked in public service for over 30 years and became the first Education Endowment Foundation Chief Executive in October 2011, having previously been Chief Executive in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. Prior to this role, he led a distinguished career in education – starting off as a primary school teacher, leading the Primary Literacy Strategy as National Director, and then serving as Director of Children’s Services at Tower Hamlets.

Kevan also gained international experience working in Mozambique and supporting the development of a national literacy initiative in the USA. He completed his doctorate focusing on literacy development at Leeds University in 2005. Kevan is a visiting Professor at the IOE/UCL Centre for Leadership in Learning. He was knighted in 2015 for services to education.

Closing the attainment gap: the role of school resources

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23 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr James Hall Quantitative Methods Hub

Language effects in international tests: the case of PISA science

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20 November 2015 18:30 - 19:30
Seminar Room A

This seminar is part of the Language Testing Forum 2015, co-hosted by the Department of Education and the British Council. Please click here for further details.

Abstract:
Large-scale international assessments such as the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), the Trends in International Maths and Science Study (TIMSS) and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) have increasingly shaped educational policies and reforms in the last decade. While these surveys can provide invaluable insight about particular educational systems, the development and design of such tests has triggered controversy about the quality and the validity of the instruments adopted. Many of the debates revolved around the extent to which language versions of the same test can be developed while ensuring a fair comparison of student achievement across countries.

Despite the rigorous quality control exerted on the translation and adaptation processes in international assessments, bias has been detected in some items. With language being a culturally-laden, complex variable which promotes and influences thinking, devising equivalent tests in different languages is a complicated endeavour. Translation effects are unavoidable and hence bias, at some level, is inevitable. This threatens the validity and reliability of the tests and raises questions about the extent to which policies based on international assessments rely on solid grounds. In this plenary session, we will present two studies from PISA 2006, illustrating the challenges of language in the cognitive test and the student questionnaire. We will discuss released items from PISA science tests and student questionnaires and highlight language issues associated with them.

The Language Testing Forum 2015. Assessing general language proficiency: definitions and approaches

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20 November 2015 -
15 Norham Gardens, Oxford

Teachers’ descriptions of mathematics tasks

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19 November 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Abstract:
Teachers and curriculum designers have developed an extensive vocabulary for describing mathematics tasks, using adjectives such as “rich”, “open”, “real-life”, “engaging” and so on. In this seminar I will present a series of studies carried out in collaboration with Matthew Inglis (Loughborough University) in which we investigated the structure of the language that teachers use to describe mathematics tasks. We found that task descriptions vary on seven relatively independent dimensions, which I will describe. We investigated the extent to which teachers have a shared understanding of the meaning of adjectives when applied to particular mathematical tasks and found little between-teacher consensus, suggesting that the perceived properties of classroom tasks are largely subjective. Implications for how pedagogic practice might be discussed by teachers, teacher educators and curriculum designers will be discussed.

Secular institutions, Islam and education policy in France (Seminar cancelled)

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19 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly and Dr Victoria Elliot, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Quality of early childhood environments in Greece.

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18 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Metalinguistic activity in language education

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18 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT)

It’s like a doctor! The role of mobile and social media for rural community health workers

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18 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group

Abstract: In his talk Christoph Pimmer will provide insights into an 8 month field study that he has conducted in rural Malawi. To understand the ways in which community health workers in rural areas have appropriated basic smartphones as job aids, communication and learning tools, he has carried out site visits, interviews and focus groups. In addition, Christoph will also report findings from an intervention in which social mobile media have been used for the supervision, training and peer communication of groups of health workers in the same context. Finally, the talk will link the project’s findings to the use of social and mobile media by health professionals from a more global perspective.

About the speaker: Christoph Pimmer is currently a visiting researcher at the UCL Institute of Education. In Switzerland he works as senior researcher and lecturer at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland FHNW. Christoph’s interests are centred on the role of digital media for learning and knowledge processes. Most of his academic work has concentrated on the use of mobile and social media with a particular focus on public and global health. His research on learning technologies has been funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), the Swiss Commission for Technology and Innovation (CTI), EU-lifelong learning and various other national funding bodies in Switzerland.

Teacher education: ensuring excellence; guaranteeing supply

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18 November 2015 -
St Anne’s College

Knowledge and virtue in teaching and learning

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17 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Forum, in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

English-medium instruction in higher education: navigating the school-to-university transition in Hong Kong

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17 November 2015 13:30 - 14:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

The scare tactic: Does it work? Motivating students for test and examinations (Public Seminar)

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16 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA)

Abstract:A relatively common motivational strategy used by teachers, and others, prior to high-stakes examinations (such as the GCSE) is to communicate to students how the negative consequence of failure for one’s subsequent life trajectory. This could include access to subsequent forms of education and training, entry to the labour market and the impact on one’s sense of self-worth. When used in this way, to highlight the negative consequences of failure, and how these can be avoided, these communications are referred to as fear appeals. In this seminar David will attempt to unpick the use of fear appeals as a motivational strategy and address the fundamental question of whether they are effective or not. Drawing on some of the studies conducted with colleagues he will focus on two key aspects: How fear appeals are understood by students and how they relate to key educational outcomes (including motivation, engagement and achievement)

About the speaker:David graduated in 1994 and worked as a teacher in various schools and colleges in the North West of England till 2003. On completing a PhD in 2006, David took up a position at Edge Hill University, initially in the Department of Social and Psychological Sciences and subsequently in the Faculty of Education. His research interests are focused on the psychological factors that influence, and in turn are influenced by, learning and achievement.

Access to Higher Education as a policy issue: tuition fees and beyond

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16 November 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Hubert Ertl, Higher Education Research Group

Abstract:There are four dimensions to this paper. Firstly to offer an outline of the various facets of access to higher education as a policy issue.  Secondly to put forward an overview of the ends that access policy should attempt to achieve for the various parties that have a direct stake in its functioning. Thirdly to present an analysis of the changing forces that have shaped the evolution of access policy in the UK, and, finally, to support the claim that we have reached the end of the access policy trail. This is, therefore, essentially a descriptive and prescriptive approach to higher education policy-making, although not without its analytical pretensions.

Ted Tapper spent most of his academic career at the University of Sussex, starting as an assistant lecturer in the Politics department and concluding it as head of the department of International Relations and Politics.  He currently holds the title of Research Professor at the Oxfprd Cemte fpr Higher Education Policy Studies, New College.

Should I worry about which GCSEs these applicants took? The practical impact of the non-comparability between GCSE subjects

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16 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr James Hall Quantitative Methods Hub

Visual methods in theory and practice

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12 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly and Dr Victoria Elliot, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Shared book reading in the early years: the teacher’s mediation

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11 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups Abstract: Many studies have shown the positive impact of reading stories aloud on children's language and literacy development. This has long been considered an essential activity in Early Childhood Education. However, the quality of the teacher mediation is crucial to engage the children in a significant reading experience and to develop critical readers. In my talk I will be discussing one of the dimensions of this mediation process, i.e., the quality of the conversations about books, during reading sessions at Brazilian state Pre-schools. I will present some results of qualitative research about this topic and a case study (Nascimento, Brandão, 2013) in which a teacher was asked to plan five reading sessions for her group of 5 year old children. The sessions were videorecorded and the teacher was confronted with her practice, watching, reflecting and discussing the videos with us. The complex task of producing methodologies for pedagogical work with young children will be addressed.

Two modes of written corrective feedback for L2 learners

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10 November 2015 13:30 - 14:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

How well are children in Sudan taught to read compared to other countries in the Middle East and North Africa? (Public seminar)

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09 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Maia Chankseliani, Centre for Comparative and International Education Abstract: This seminar examines the development of a National Learning Assessment in Sudan and reports on the findings of its first study. We know that National Learning Assessments can play an important role in demonstrating the efficiency of investments in education, help governments to monitor the effectiveness of educational interventions and policies, and address issues related to equity and to provision.  It is largely through frequently repeated assessments of learning achievement that policy makers can tell the extent to which investments in education do in fact result in educational progress. Without such repeated measures there can be little understanding of trends in student learning outcomes and as such, robust evidence to guide policy and investment in education will remain elusive. The first study sought to establish how well students had been taught to read and to carry out basic mathematical operations in the early years of schooling in Sudan.  The achievements of Grade 3 students in Sudan are compared with children of a similar age and stage of schooling in 5 other Arabic speaking countries. The findings point to deep and worrying learning deficits across the region About the speaker: Dr David Johnson is a Chartered Educational Psychologist registered with the Health Professions Council (UK) and the British Psychological Society. He convenes the MSc Education (Comparative and International Education). He is associated with Oxford’s Blatvanik School of Government. He has expertise in educational assessment and testing and has carried out numerous studies into children’s learning and the professional knowledge and capabilities of teachers and school leaders in developing countries. He has worked extensively on the development of curriculum and assessment policies, national learning assessments and initiatives aimed at strengthening the delivery of education, including educational management information systems.

Who am I and what can I achieve? A study of the relationships between identity, expectations, values and A-level achievement

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09 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr James Hall Quantitative Methods Hub

Writing for publication

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05 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly and Dr Victoria Elliot, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group

Children Learning and Fell student presentations

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04 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups Speakers: Brad Chan: Is oral reading fluency related to reading comprehension in bilingual children? Zhen Zheng: Chinese children’s use of third person singular pronouns

Being Other: the effectiveness of arts based approaches in engaging with disaffected young people

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04 November 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Seminar room A

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT)

English Medium Instruction: Global views and countries in focus

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04 November 2015 10:00 - 17:00
Seminar Room G/H

Trusting teachers within reason: dialogical pedagogy and the epistemology of testimony

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03 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy, Religion and Education Forum, in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford Branch)

Global Englishes for Language Teaching: a framework for curriculum innovation

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03 November 2015 13:30 - 14:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

'Online all the time' ... Teachers' work in the digital age (Public seminar)

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02 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract: This seminar explores the ways in which digital technologies are now implicated in teachers’ work and labour. Drawing upon in-depth ethnographic studies of three Australian high schools, Neil will detail the ways in which teachers’ work is now enacted along digital lines – often in notably intensified, standardized and evidenced ways. However, these research findings also raise questions regarding the extent to which these digitizations can be said to constitute wholly ‘new’ labour conditions – pointing to continuities and disjunctures between teachers’ work with and without digital technology. As such, Neil will also consider the differentiated experiences of these conditions across teaching workforces. We conclude by considering how more equitable and/or empowering working conditions might be achievable through alternate uses of digital technology. About the speaker: Professor Neil Selwyn is a professor in the Faculty of Education, Monash University. His research and teaching focuses on the place of digital media in everyday life, and the sociology of technology (non)use in educational settings. Neil has written extensively on a number of issues, including digital exclusion, education technology policymaking and the student experience of technology-based learning. He has carried out funded research on digital technology, society and education for the Australian Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), British Academy, the BBC, Nuffield Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, Gates Foundation, Microsoft Partners in Learning, Becta, Australian Government Office of Learning & Teaching, Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Centre for Distance Education, the Welsh Office, National Assembly of Wales and various local authorities in the UK. Neil is co-editor of the journal ‘Learning, Media and Technology' (http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cjem20/current), and a regular keynote speaker at international conferences. Neil is a core member of the ‘Learning with New Media' (http://newmediaresearch.educ.monash.edu.au/lnm/) research group within Monash.

Paying for success: the impact of financial support on students’ university performance

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02 November 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr James Hall Quantitative Methods Hub

Differences in how teachers make mathematical content available to learners over time

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29 October 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

‘Immediately I felt in a position of advantage over my sister’: postwar women’s experiences of the 11+

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29 October 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly and Dr Victoria Elliot, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group Abstract: The 1944 Education Act ushered in the era of tripartite secondary education in Britain with selection determined by the eleven plus examination. For many years lauded as a system which encouraged meritocracy and social mobility, the historian Selina Todd has recently questioned whether postwar education really ‘created equality of opportunity’.  This paper uses oral history methods to explore the impact of this education system on the lives of women who experienced it. Focusing on women is especially important as the postwar period was such a crucial time in the history of women yet it is the figure of the grammar school boy which dominates our understanding of the 11+.  What emerges from an analysis of personal testimony is the profound effect of the selective examination on women’s sense of self as the implications of the 11+ result ripple outwards across the telling of the life story.

Pathways from parenting to peer relationships in primary school children

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28 October 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Parenting support: evidence, policy and practice (Public seminar)

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26 October 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract: In this talk I shall draw upon two large scale studies of parenting programmes to explore two issues: evidence for their effectiveness, and implications for policy and practice. The Parenting Early Intervention Programme (2006-11) examined targeted parenting programmes, aimed at parents of children exhibiting or at risk of behavioural difficulties; the CANparent trial (2012-14) explored the effectiveness of universal parenting classes aimed at all parents. Each was funded by the Department for Education but represented different policy agendas of Labour and Coalition governments respectively. Finally, I shall consider the implications for future policy and practice. About the speaker: Professor Geoff Lindsay was appointed to the inaugural chair in special needs education and educational psychology at the University of Warwick in 1995 and has been Director of the Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research (CEDAR) since 1999. Before joining Warwick, he was Principal Educational Psychologist of the Sheffield Psychological Service. His main areas of research are special educational needs and in particular speech, language and communication needs; parenting support; the evaluation of government initiatives; assessment and measurement; and ethical issues concerning research and professional practice. Geoff has directed over 80 research projects and programmes including the CANparent trial of universal parenting programmes (DfE, 2012-14, DH 2014-15), the Better Communication Research Programme (2009-12), and the Parenting Early Intervention Programme (2006-11). He is currently leading the implementation evaluation as part of the Warwick Consortium’s evaluation of the Big Lottery funded A Better Start, and is also engaged with the DfE funded Review of arrangements for disagreement resolution (2015-17). Geoff was consultant to the Lamb Inquiry into parental confidence in the SEN system and was appointed Specialist Adviser to the House of Commons Education Committee for the scrutiny of the Children & Families Bill. Publications include over 140 papers in refereed journals. Geoff is a Fellow and Past President of the British Psychological Society, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences. In 2006 he was made an Honorary Life Member of the British Psychological Society in recognition of his contribution to psychology.

Adaptability: examining its role in academic outcomes, workplace effectiveness, personal wellbeing, responses to climate change – and surviving the zombie apocalypse

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26 October 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr James Hall Quantitative Methods Hub

A content analysis of the text of teacher talk

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22 October 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly and Dr Victoria Elliot, Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group Abstract: I am interested in how the teacher’s role within a mathematics classroom changes over the course of a series of lessons on a particular topic. Taking a multiple case study approach in order to investigate this phenomenon, I conducted a content analysis of the text of what was said by the teacher while teaching a series of lessons. In this seminar, I will explain this approach and will describe how it allowed me to study the modes of teacher interaction that featured across each lesson series, the forms of mathematical content made available and the sequencing of these forms.

Advantages and challenges in comparative research on inclusive and special education: the case of Finland.

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20 October 2015 17:30 - 18:45
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstract: Despite the growing interest in comparative education research in general, in the field of inclusive and special education it is still relatively rare. One explanation might be that there are many challenges related to the international comparison of special education systems conceptually and related to the use of educational statistics. This presentation is based on the experiences of challenges and advantages in trying to create a reliable comparative view of the Finnish (special) education system compared with some other Western school systems (e.g. US, Canada, Australia). The Finnish special education system (currently redefined as Learning and Schooling support) should not be examined as separate from the Finnish compulsory school system, because special education is an essential and build-in part of the Finnish compulsory schooling. It should be noted that Finnish compulsory schooling covers almost 99 per cent of the age group and in that sense it is probably one of the most inclusive in the world. The unique element of the Finnish special educational services is the wide use of additional support services (called traditionally as part-time special education) available in every school. If needed, this support covers every student without any diagnosis or administrative decisions. This model of service has been created already during the 1970’s reform of comprehensive schooling as an answer to deal with a more heterogeneous group of pupils. In general, it should be noted that it is not fair/reliable to compare school systems from a cross-sectional standing only. Comparative research needs to take into account the historical structures and cultural differences. For a meaningful comparison, we need authentic and accurate information from the everyday reality of actual school life as well – not only from the level of education policy. Literature: Jahnukainen, M. 2015. “Inclusion, Integration, or What? A Comparative Study of the School Principals’ Perceptions of Inclusive and Special Education in Finland and in Alberta, Canada.” Disability & Society 30 (1): 59–72. doi:10.1080/09687599.2014.982788. Pulkkinen J., & M. Jahnukainen. 2015. “Finnish Reform of the Funding and Provision of Special Education: The Views of Principals and Municipal Education Administrators.” Educational Review. E-pub ahead of print. doi: 10.1080/00131911.2015.1060586. Graham, L. J., and M. Jahnukainen. 2011. “Wherefore Art Thou, Inclusion? Analysing the Development of Inclusive Education in New South Wales, Alberta and Finland.” Journalof Education Policy 26 (2): 263–288. doi:10.1080/02680939.2010.493230. Jahnukainen, M. 2011. “Different Strategies, Different Outcomes? The History and Trends of Inclusive and Special Education in Alberta (Canada) and in Finland.” Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 55 (5): 489–502. doi:10.1080/00313831.2010.537689. Itkonen, T., and M. Jahnukainen. 2010. “Disability or Learning Difficulty? Politicians or Educators? Constructing Special Education in Finland and the United States.” Comparative Sociology 9 (2): 182–201. doi:10.1163/156913210X12536181351033.

English-medium instruction in the school system: colonial and post-colonial perspectives

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20 October 2015 13:30 - 14:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Assessment and Learning (Public Seminar)

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19 October 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Dr Therese Hopfenbeck, Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA)

On a law of ordinal error

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19 October 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr James Hall Quantitative Methods Hub

The spread of “content and language integrated learning” programmes in Spanish schools: a research-based approach

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16 October 2015 13:30 - 14:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

The writing difficulties of individuals with dyslexia and specific language impairment

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14 October 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

OSAT DPhil student conference

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14 October 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstracts: Sonia Khan:  Exploring teachers’ meaning making from classroom experiences The research draws on sociocultural theory to explore how teachers transform their knowledge for student learning to happen, and how they utilize this experience for their own learning. To understand this complexity, multiple case studies will be utilized. The data will be collected at three phases of a lesson- lesson planning, classroom observation and recall of the lesson. Marion Waite: Formative interventions for collaborative academic research writing How can formative writing interventions within the healthcare academy be examined for transformation of learning? I will present the endeavours and challenges of seeking congruency with the research context, writing research, cultural historical activity theory (CHAT), double stimulation, The Change Laboratory and the epicentre of research methods. Kasper Munk: Dealing with task uncertainty: cmplex demands in schools and teachers’ responses Competent teaching requires teachers to settle on which work tasks to carry out. However, complex demands in schools can create considerable work task uncertainty. My research project seeks to identify and explain different types of responses to task uncertainty through the development of a theoretical model of teacher task uncertainty.

Meta-linguistic predictors of word-level literacy skills in monolingual English-speaking children and Chinese children with English as a second language

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13 October 2015 13:30 - 14:30
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Jess Briggs, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Department of Education Research Poster Conference

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12 October 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Rooms A, B, G & H

Displaying the work of our staff and students in their research groups and centres. Wander around to see the posters, exchange ideas with the authors and other staff and students or just catch up with old friends. Refreshments available in the Common Room from 5pm.

Patterns and differences in subject choices at 14 in England: intersections of gender, ethnicity and social class

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12 October 2015 12:30 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr James Hall Quantitative Methods Hub

An introduction to Vygotsky

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07 October 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT)

Theories of potential and the creation of inequality in education

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18 September 2015 18:30 - 19:30
Lady Margaret Hall, Norham Gardens, OX2 6QA

Beyond the classroom: researching second language learning in out-of-class contexts

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18 September 2015 -

Preparing English young people for work and life, an international perspective

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14 September 2015 14:30 - 17:00
St. Anne's College, Oxford

Abstract: The paper provides a panoramic, systemic overview of policies, structures and trends; identifies a range of strengths and weaknesses; and offers a number of recommendations about how support for improvement and reform might be marshalled and deployed. Its aim is not to provide a blueprint or roadmap, but rather to act as an aid for reflection by stakeholders in the English system. One of its key arguments is that the current balance between central government and localities needs to be re-thought, with greater stability at the centre and more opportunities for innovation and the sharing of good practice at the local, and with accountability arrangements that do not solely focus on the individual school. About the speaker: Dr Cappon is a past president and CEO of the Canadian Council on Learning, and a past CEO of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada. In 2014-15 Dr Cappon was invited by the UK Secretary of State for Education to become a Policy Fellow at the DfE and to undertake a review of policy and to formulate findings, conclusions and recommendations that could inform policy deliberations in the Department. Dr Cappon’s report was presented to the Secretary of State as a brief on 1 May 2015. SKOPE is pleased to be able to publish this, under an Open Government Licence, as a SKOPE Policy Paper. This seminar marks the launch of the paper and will address some of the most important issues that the paper raises. Places are limited.  To book to attend, please contact skope@education.ox.ac.uk .

WorldSkills Participation: Perspectives from FE colleges, competitors and training managers

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11 September 2015 10:30 - 17:00
Department of Education

The speakers will include SKOPE staff who will present findings from their most recent research on competitors, college participation in competitions, as well as the training managers involved. Mr Nigel Leigh from Stephenson College will also present on his recent research. The plenary will bring together the various ideas presented throughout the day. Click here download the programme for the day. If you would like to attend this event please RSVP to skope@education.ox.ac.uk by 4 September 2015.

WorldSkills Participation: Perspectives from FE colleges, competitors and training managers

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17 July 2015 10:30 - 17:00
St Anne’s College

The speakers will include SKOPE staff who will present findings from their most recent research on competitors, college participation in competitions, as well as the training managers involved. Mr Nigel Leigh from Stephenson College will also present on his recent research. The plenary will bring together the various ideas presented throughout the day. Click here download the programme for the day. If you would like to attend this event please RSVP to skope@education.ox.ac.uk by 10 July.

WorldSkills competitors and entrepreneurship: strengths and limitations of the study design, data analysis, and findings

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18 June 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies Abstract: This paper examines how and in what contexts young people who achieved excellence in vocational occupations discovered, evaluated, and exploited opportunities to become entrepreneurial. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with those who represented the UK at WorldSkills competitions.  The sample of 40 participants included 30 entrepreneurial individuals: 13 entrepreneurs; four intrapreneurs; and 13 latent entrepreneurs. Ten competitors interviewed were not interested in entrepreneurship. Qualitative and quantitative data were analysed using thematic and statistical techniques. A variety of individual and contextual factors influence the development of entrepreneurship. This study focused on four individual-level factors - social capital, psychological capital, human capital, and entrepreneurial motivation - and two contextual factors - industry-specific conditions and geographical context. Links were established between WorldSkills competitors' social capital, psychological capital, human capital and how the skills competition experience contributed to the enhancement of different dimensions of these three types of capital as well as to the development of entrepreneurial motivation. The findings pointed towards the conclusion that training for and participation in WorldSkills enabled entrepreneurship by developing competitors' social networks, psychological characteristics, and technical and business interaction skills. However, it also emerged that the majority of entrepreneurial competitors had been entrepreneurial before they became involved with WorldSkills. Entrepreneurial motivation often preceded participants' engagement with competitions.

Impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment

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17 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Said Business School

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/impact-and-knowledge-exchange-seminars For details and to register your interest please email  sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk. About the speakers: Sir Andrew Dilnot is Warden of Nuffield College Oxford and Chairman of the UK Statistics Authority. He was the Chairman of the Commission on the Funding of Care and Support, which reported in 2011.  He was Principal of St Hugh’s College, Oxford, from 2002 to 2012. He is the presenter of BBC Radio 4’s ‘A History of Britain in Numbers’, and was the founding presenter of BBC Radio 4’s series on the beauty of numbers, ‘More or Less’. He was Director of the IFS (Institute for Fiscal Studies) from 1991 to 2002. Claire Donovan is Reader in Science and Technology Studies, and joined Brunel University London in 2010. She previously held research and teaching positions at the Research School of Social Sciences, The Australian National University; Nuffield College, Oxford University; and The Open University. She has published extensively on research evaluation and research policy, and has long been an advocate for considering the unique qualities of the humanities, arts and social sciences within science-based evaluation systems. In 2006 she was Chair of an Australian Government Technical Working Group on Research Impact where she championed the use of case studies and narratives alongside robust impact indicators. The work of this group influenced the design of REF2014. During 2015 Claire is Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Education, Oxford University, and a Visiting Fellow in the Research School of Social Sciences at The Australian National University. She has been a visiting fellow at Cambridge University, Harvard University, the London School of Economics, the National University of Singapore, and the University of Sussex. In 2013 she was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

Bayesian methods for international assessments

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17 June 2015 -
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Three day course: Wednesday 17th - Friday 19th June The orientation of this workshop is to introduce social scientists to the basic elements of Bayesian statistics and to show through discussion and practice, why the Bayesian perspective provides a powerful alternative to the frequentist perspective. We will use data from international assessments to provide workshop participants with opportunities for practice. In addition, we will focus on the use of existing programs in the R software environment. Course prerequisite: It is assumed that participants will have a background in basic statistical methods up to, and including, regression analysis. Some exposure to growth curve modelling is desirable. Note: This workshop is the second part (days 2-4) of a four-day workshop on the analysis of international assessment data using R. Participants who require an introduction to R and international assessments should sign up to the first day workshop by Dr. Daniel Caro (listed above). Participants are expected to attend the full three days of the course. Course fee: Oxford University Participant (Students, Staff): No charge Other Students: £90 External Other: £300 The course fee includes access to training sessions/events, event materials, lunch and refreshments. The fee does not include accommodation or travel. Registration: Oxford University participants should register via Weblearn. Browse by Department and select Education. Other students and external participants please complete the registration form and return by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk. ESRC Student Bursaries: ESRC student bursaries are available to postgraduate students from Higher Education Institutions outside Oxford to provide up to £120 per day financial assistance toward the cost of attending the course. Students will also be able to claim reasonable travel costs within the UK to Oxford, plus reasonable accommodation costs up to £100 per night for the duration of the course. Students must pay upfront for the course and then claim costs back after they have attended, providing receipts for all expenses. Please note: You must be a postgraduate research student at a UK Higher Education Institution to be eligible for bursary funding. If you would like to apply for an ESRC student bursary please complete the ESRC bursary application form and return it by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk together with your registration form.

Developing Citizenship Education in England

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16 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room H

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch), jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum.

Introduction to R for the analysis of international assessment data

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16 June 2015 09:00 - 17:00
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

The workshop will introduce the R software environment and train participants in how to analyse data from international assessments (PISA, TIMSS, and PIRLS) using R. It will present the basics of the R language and data analysis in R, including how to create and import data, calculate descriptive statistics, perform regression analysis, and conduct analysis by grouping variables. Lectures will introduce international assessments and the challenges associated with the analysis of assessment data (e.g., plausible values, replicate weights). Hands-on exercises will reproduce main results in international assessment reports with the R package 'instvy'. The last part of the workshop will be dedicated to an assignment. The workshop is aimed at researchers interested in R and international assessments. Workshop prerequisites: It is assumed that participants will have a background in basic statistical methods up to, and including, regression analysis. Some familiarity with syntax language from other statistical packages (e.g., Stata, SPSS) is desirable. Note: This workshop is the first day of a four-day workshop on the analysis of international assessment data using R. This first day adopts a frequentist perspective and the second part (days 2-4) the Bayesian paradigm. Participants are encouraged, but not required, to sign up to the second part on Bayesian statistics by Professor David Kaplan. Course fee: Oxford University Participant (Students, Staff): No charge Other Students: £30 External Other: £100 The course fee includes access to training sessions/events, event materials, lunch and refreshments. The fee does not include accommodation or travel. Registration: Oxford University participants should register via Weblearn. Browse by Department and select Education. Other students and external participants please complete the registration form and return by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk. ESRC Student Bursaries: ESRC student bursaries are available to postgraduate students from Higher Education Institutions outside Oxford to provide up to £120 per day financial assistance toward the cost of attending the course. Students will also be able to claim reasonable travel costs within the UK to Oxford, plus reasonable accommodation costs up to £100 per night for the duration of the course. Students must pay upfront for the course and then claim costs back after they have attended, providing receipts for all expenses. Please note: You must be a postgraduate research student at a UK Higher Education Institution to be eligible for bursary funding. If you would like to apply for an ESRC student bursary please complete the ESRC bursary application form and return it by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk together with your registration form.

The rediscovery of teaching: in search of a progressive argument (Public seminar)

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15 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Rebecca Enyon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group, jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum. Abstract: Over the past decades the discourse of educational theory, policy and practice has shifted dramatically into the direction of learning. Some have even suggested that we have witnessed a paradigm shift from ‘teaching’ to ‘learning.’ Whereas there are good reasons for paying more attention to learning, I believe that something has also been lost in this shift, particularly with regard to the status, identity and role of the teacher. There is therefore a need to rebalance the situation, also because a theory of learning does not translate automatically into a theory of education — a theory in which teaching and the teacher play a central role. The difficulty, however, is that currently most arguments in favour of teaching and the teacher seem to come from the conservative end of the spectrum, where teaching is basically understood as an act of control. That is why, in my presentation, I will go in search of a progressive argument for ‘giving teaching back to education’ (Biesta 2012) About the speaker: Gert Biesta is Professor of Education and Director of Research at Brunel University. In addition he is Visiting Professor (Art Education) at ArtEZ, Institute of the Arts, the Netherlands. He also has visiting affiliations with NLA University College, Bergen, Norway, and NAFOL, the Norwegian Graduate School in Teacher Education. He previously worked at universities in Luxembourg, the UK and the Netherlands, and was a postdoctoral fellow with the National Academy of Education in the USA. Since 2015 he is an associate member of the ‘Onderwijsraad’ (the Education Council of the Netherlands), which is the main education advisory body for the Dutch government. He is joint-coordinator of SIG 25 (Educational Theory) of EARLI, The European Association for Research and Learning and Instruction, and co-editor of two book-series with Routledge: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education (with Michael A. Peters) and Theorizing Education (with Julie Allan and Richard Edwards). From 1999 to 2014 he was editor-in-chief of Studies in Philosophy and Education, and currently serves as chief advisory editor. His work focuses on the theory and philosophy of education, education policy, and the theory and philosophy of educational and social research. He has a particular interest in questions of democracy and democratisation.  His current research focuses on (1) the theory and philosophy of teaching; (2) teacher education theory and policy; (3) democratic professionality in education and related fields; (4) the impact of research policy on educational research; (5) teacher agency; (6) curriculum policy and theory; and (7) European policy concerning citizenship and lifelong learning. More information about his research can be found at www.gertbiesta.com

Context questionnaire rotation and imputation with implications for the estimation of plausible values in large-scale assessments

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15 June 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract: This paper presents findings on the consequences of context questionnaire rotation for the estimation of plausible values in large-scale assessments. Three studies are conducted. Study 1 uses data from PISA 2012 to examine several different forms of imputation within the chained equation framework: predictive mean matching, Bayesian linear regression, and proportional odds logistic regression. We find that predictive mean matching is a very accurate method for imputing missing context questionnaire data due to rotation. Study 2 uses data from PISA 2006 to examine the consequences of imputing context questionnaire data in terms of the estimation of plausible values. We find that imputing context questionnaire data with predictive mean matching and using the imputed data to produce the plausible values yields very close approximation of the original marginal distributions but leads to underestimation of the correlation structure. Study 3 examines imputation and plausible values estimation within a partially incomplete block design. We find that imputation within this design accurately reproduces the original marginal distributions and retains the correlation structure of the data. Implications for context questionnaire development are discussed.

Concepts and mastery in learning and teaching mathematics

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11 June 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group Abstract:  In this session, Alf will consider the question of how we come to acquire mastery over mathematical concepts. Two sources of evidence converge to bring into question the orthodoxy that learning mathematics entails a movement from concrete to abstract. The first is recent neuroscience research into the origins of number sense and the previously unacknowledged role of ordinality (see the work of Ian Lyons). The second source comes from reflection on three of the great mathematics educators of the twentieth century, Caleb Gattegno, Vasily Davydov and Bob Davis. All three authors developed mathematics curricula (shown to be highly effective) in which mathematical symbolism arose out of action and relationship, not as a referrent for concrete objects. Alf will work with the group actively on these ideas and the direct implications for the classroom. There will be space for feedback and discussion of issues.

Mathematics Education Reading Group

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11 June 2015 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Mathematics Education Research Group (MERG) Reading

Simulation as a scaffold for creative learning: Incorporating open-ended course elements as part of higher-education pedagogy.

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11 June 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies Abstract: http://barretthonors.asu.edu/2013/06/dr-abby-loebenberg/ Looking at new research in the study of creativity and the socio-biology of play in late adolescence, this seminar will be a forum to discuss the value and role of playful pedagogies in higher education settings.   I will introduce a number of models from single-class to entire-course frameworks with a particular focus on the use of immersive role-playing formats across a variety of social science and humanities subjects.  Some of these models are experimental and some established however, all of them rely on the facilitation of “mini-c” (Kaufmann and Beghetto: 2009) proto-creative processes in order to allow students to develop critical thinking skills through the internalization of an alternative self.  Harnessing valuable meta-cognitive reflections on this mini-c process can be useful to teach qualitative research methods in-classroom, to help students understand and filter historical processes through their own lived experience, or to illustrate the social value of a ‘strange’ (to them) cultural practice.   While these models primarily address the U.S. higher-education general education context, they could also be very useful for A-Level teachers in the UK in subjects like History, Sociology, Anthropology, Communication and Culture and so on.

Approaches to facilitating research impact

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10 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Said Business School

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/impact-and-knowledge-exchange-seminars For details and to register your interest please email  sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk. Abstract: Whilst research has always had impact, research impact is still a relatively new concept in REF terms. The talk will reflect on ways in which research can lead to impact and how this can be evidenced. The main focus will be on approaches and strategies for increasing impact with respect to the next REF. Ideally preparations should begin before the research starts but there are also activities that can be added on during and after the research which can increase the potential for impact. About the Speaker: Simon is responsible for the central research office of 25 staff at Kent covering all aspects of research support including pre-award, contracts, post-award, information, REF, ethics and governance. He has been a research manager and administrator for over 20 years and is a veteran of four RAE/REF submissions at two institutions. Simon is the Chair of the Association of Research Managers and Administrators (ARMA) and sits on a number of other related national groups and committees. He is a member of: the steering group of the Independent review of the role of metrics in research assessment which is advising the Higher Education Funding Council for England; the Universities UK Open Access Group; and the Jisc Open Access and ORCID steering groups. He holds a professional doctorate in electronic research administration.

Collaborating on complex problems

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10 June 2015 16:30 - 18:10
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Speakers: Bipana Bantawa, Anne Edwards, Nigel Fancourt and Nick Hopwood. Discussant: Kasper Munk In this OSAT symposium four contributors to a book to be published by Cambridge University Press  in 2016 will make short presentations on how they have employed the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency in their work. Anne Edwards will outline the three concepts and some examples of how they are currently being used in different settings internationally; Nick Hopwood will draw on his research on multi-professional services for families in New South Wales; Bipana Bantawa will outline how relational expertise is deployed in Galaxy Zoo, a crowd-sourced science project; and Nigel Fancourt will illustrate how the ideas have informed the Oxford Education Deanery , making links between the concept of common knowledge and current narrative research. Kasper Munk, who has long been familiar with these ideas while studying in Denmark, will be discussant. There will be time for questions and discussion and all are welcome to this open symposium. A short paper outlining the key concepts can be accessed here.  (But pre-reading is not obligatory.)

Conservative education policy on free schools

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09 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch), jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum.

Shoehorning Shakespeare

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09 June 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Velda Elliott, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education Abstract Shoehorning Shakespeare into genre-studies in the new A level Literature. We're used to various plays being categorised as 'Gothic' but how about as crime or social and political protest literature? We will be talking about the appropriateness of using anachronistic genre labels, what it adds to or subtracts from our understanding of the plays, and how it might play out pedagogically in the sixth form classroom.

Design and practice: a study of the design, build and occupation of new schools (Public seminar)

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08 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Professor Ernesto Macaro (OSAT) Abstract: In this seminar we will present an account of ways in which the discourses and practices of school design produce educational spaces which mediate and shape the discourses and practices of teaching and learning when the building is occupied. We will discuss previously unreported findings from an examination of the vision, design, build and occupation of four schools commissioned by the same Local Authority in Wave 3 of the Building Schools for the Future Programme. We examined the processes of occupation which in 3 cases involved changes of leadership We identified significant discontinuities at particular phases in relation to either the intended physical structure and what was actually built, and/or in relation to how space was intended to be used and how it was actually used in practice. We interviewed members of all the different agencies who were involved throughout this process, e.g. the school, the Local Authority, the Architects and the Contractors.   What became very clear was that different motives were in play for different agencies at different moments in the process. For example some agencies were driven by motives related to succcesful bidding for contracts at one moment and motives related to costs and time at another. Many of these were in conflict with one another at critical times in the process which would lead to significant compromises for the built school environment. About the speakers: Professor Harry Daniels joined the Department in 2013 having held Chairs at the Universities of Bath and Birmingham.  His recent research draws on cultural historical and activity theory approaches to learning and organisational change, focusing on professional learning, processes of social exclusion and practices of collaboration in a variety of educational, medical and emergency settings. Hau Ming Tse is a Research Fellow at the Department of Education and an Associate Lecturer in the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes University. A qualified Architect, she worked for David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; San Michele Cemetery, Venice; and The Figge Art Museum, Iowa. Her research interests explore the relationship between space, perception and the environment.

Internet use and health: using secondary data for spatial microsimulation.

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08 June 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract: Internet use is seen as a potential lever for empowering patients, levelling inequalities and reducing costs in the health system. However, we need to better understand the relationship between Internet use and health to assess potential benefits and adverse effects, with digital inclusion, health provision quality and health system efficiency being high on the agenda of UK and EU policymakers. This presentation addresses the research question of how Internet use influences individuals' health service use and their health perception. With a focus on health information seeking, it looks at the differences between users and non-users, what the mediating mechanisms between Internet use and health are, and what role individual and contextual factors play in their relationship. Using a mixed methods approach, this research analyses these questions in the context of England. Quantitative data from the Oxford Internet Surveys (OxIS), the English census and Hospital Episode Statistics was connected through spatial microsimulation based on output areas. In spatial microsimulation, a simulated dataset based on probabilistic methods is created from existing secondary data (existing surveys and routine data from the health system). As a spatial model, this provides a simulated dataset of all individuals in a given geographic area with their Internet use, health service use and perceived health, which can then be used to examine associations between characteristics similarly to a "real" dataset - with some caveats that will be discussed in the presentation. In addition, qualitative data was collected through 43 semi-structured face-to-face interviews primarily with former OxIS participants from purposively selected output areas used in the quantitative strand. Based on the qualitative insights, the quantitative data is revisited to analyse emerging themes on a larger scale. The findings of this research project advance the theoretical understanding of effects of Internet use on health, and provide practical implications for health professionals and policymakers with insights down to the local level. At the same time, this research demonstrates how secondary data can be linked in a privacy-preserving and cost-effective way, and in conjunction with qualitative data can deliver insights for the public well-being.  

Trauma and resilience

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04 June 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies

Competing for excellence: perverse and constructive effects of evaluation machines in academia

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03 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Nuffield College

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/impact-and-knowledge-exchange-seminars For details and to register your interest please email  sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk. Abstract: Many universities have become obsessed with performance indicators and their position in the global university rankings. This holds for education, but also for research. Evaluation has become formalized in national and local assessment protocols and is usually performed one or more steps removed from the primary process of education or research, often by evaluation professionals and managers. At the same time, research has become more competitive at a global scale, also in fields where competition was less prominent only a few decades ago. As a result, research leaders increasingly need to think strategically about their research portfolio and profile. However, the data they have at their disposal are often ill suited to their needs. Moreover, the type of evaluation they are interested in may not always be aligned with the existing formalized evaluation protocols. In my talk, I will discuss the current tensions in the way researchers are being evaluated and assessed against the background of a short history of research evaluation and the rise of performance indicators in academia. I will introduce the concept of "evaluation machines" as developed by the Danish economist Peter Dahler-Larsen to understand the dynamics behind disconnected assessment practices. I aim to discuss how both a desire to develop science for the people and a drive to develop a knowledge-based economy and innovation have shaped a new context in which the old culture of peer trust was no longer the best available option for all purposes. In the last part of my talk, I would like to discuss some possible scenarios for the future of knowledge creation in relation to accountability regimes in academia. I will also explore how we may wish to define excellence and scientific quality and will briefly sketch a possible alternative theory of how scientific quality might be defined. About the speaker: Paul Wouters is Professor in Scientometrics at the University of Leiden, and the director of the university’s interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS). His previous experience includes acting as a leader of the group for analysing the development of information technologies for research, both as research instruments and as new communication media, at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, followed by a five-year appointment as the programme leader for the Academy’s Virtual Knowledge Studio. He was also a visiting professor of cybermetrics at the University of Wolverhampton. Wouters is member of the editorial boards of Social Studies of Science, the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Scholarly Communication, and Cybermetrics. He has been member of the council of the Society for the Social Study of Science and is currently member of the board of the Dutch graduate school Science, Technology, and Modern Culture (WTMC). He is involved in the European project NESSHI and is PI of the 7th Framework project ACUMEN.

Webinar: Identifying and addressing the mental health needs of children in care

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03 June 2015 -
Seminar Room A

Abstract: This webinar will focus on two mental health projects involving the Rees Centre. Nikki Luke will discuss the key messages arising from the NSPCC/Rees Centre evidence review on What works in preventing and treating poor mental health in looked after children? Helen Drew from the University of Sussex will talk about the research she is conducting with schools and Virtual Schools about supporting the mental health needs of looked after children around the transition from primary to secondary school. The webinar will include an overview of both projects with plenty of time for discussion. Open to all, no registration required. Specific details for logging in on the day will be posted on the website.

Questioning the UK government’s vision of higher education and social mobility: evidence from a non-graduate occupation (Public Seminar)

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01 June 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Research Theme Convener - Policy, Economy and Society Abstract: Over recent years UK governments have expanded higher education and with it the supply of graduates. This expansion is linked to social mobility through meritocracy. However, the number of traditionally graduate jobs has not increased in line with higher education expansion. One result of this policy is graduates entering not just graduate jobs but non-graduate jobs. Using qualitative and quantitative data from research on the occupation of real estate agents selling residential properties in the UK – a traditionally non-graduate occupation being ‘graduatised’ – this presentation asks: Is this trickle down the occupational hierarchy really what the government envisioned in terms of social mobility when expanding higher education and widening access? About the Speaker: Dr Susan James Relly is Assistant Director of SKOPE and Director of Doctoral Research in the Department. She is a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the University of the Witswaterand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Susan’s entire career has been in education in various forms: she taught in secondary schools in Australia and England before starting her academic career. Susan completed a B.Ed in her native Queensland, Australia and read for a M.Sc in Comparative and International Education and a D.Phil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests are varied including Vocational Education and Training (VET) systems and policy; vocational excellence; apprenticeship; work-based learning; on-the-job and off-the-job training, social mobility; and low skill and low wage occupations.

Studying how psychological treatments work using structural equation modelling.

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01 June 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract: Psychological therapies are the leading evidence-based treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders, including eating disorders.  Although most of these treatments are theory-based, there has been little research on the mechanisms through which they achieve their effects, nor has it been established which of their components are responsible for change.  This presentation will describe an attempt to identify the mediators of action of two distinct evidence-based psychological treatments for eating disorders; cognitive behaviour therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy.  It will discuss some of the theoretical and statistical issues that arise when using longitudinal structural equation modelling for this purpose.

Are you an insider or an outsider? Using your own experience as data

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28 May 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies Abstract: If you’re studying a subject you’re really interested in, it’s likely that you have some personal experience that triggered your research questions. What are the rules for using that experience and whose experience ‘counts’ as data? How is your identity impacting on the way you collect and analyse that data? What happens if you don’t seem like a ‘normal’ researcher? This seminar explores these issues with examples from a service user researcher’s doctoral work in healthcare.

OSAT Reading Group

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27 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Reading:

Creating opportunity for digital participation: integrating computer science in the primary curriculum

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27 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract: Focusing on design thinking and integrated curriculum design, this research talk will describe an investigation of how to integrate computer science and online literacies into primary classroom settings. Primary computer science is one way to invite learners as digital participants. The study described here will demonstrate how one school is changing curriculum to encourage digital participation. Theories about participatory digital practices, constructionism, and empowering/emancipatory education offer teachers a foothold for curricular innovation. However, new theories about how to engage learners (and teachers) in meaningful and meaning-making digital practices continue to develop as teachers take up and use these theories in the contexts of schools and learning. About the speaker: Caitlin McMunn Dooley, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at Georgia State University in the US. Her research focuses on digital literacies, early literacy development, and teacher development.

'What was I thinking?!’ Being an academic in the age of impact

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27 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Nuffield College

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series For details and to register your interest please email sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk Abstract: The context for this paper is offered by one of the defining debates in cultural policy studies, namely the one around the tension between a desire to be useful to those who administer the arts and culture and the aspiration to preserve the cultural policy scholar’s critical distance from the object of analysis, intellectual autonomy and the freedom to critique. Whilst this tension is especially noticeable within a small and emerging field such as cultural policy research, it is not by any means only found there. Taking developments in the UK as the geographical focus of analysis, it is clear that increasing expectations that research, especially when publicly funded, should have ‘impact’ bring with them similar kind of tensions. Expectation that research ought to deliver ‘impact’, which is often understood as a contribution to policy development, have been hotly contested and resisted, yet an important set of questions still remain open: - What is the ultimate purpose of critical cultural policy research? Or in other words, what comes after critique? - Is critique for critique’s sake a satisfactory goal for cultural policy analysis or can we envisage a constructive engagement between critical research and policy debates that is not subservient to the needs of policy advocacy? Reflecting on my experience as academic lead for the Warwick Commission for the Future of Cultural Value I’ll explore the possibilities and challenges that developing a collaborative approach to generating fresh policy thinking entail. About the speaker: Dr Eleonora Belfiore is Associate Professor in Cultural Policy at the Centre for Cultural Policy Studies. Her research explores the cultural politics of decision-making in the cultural sphere, with a particular focus on public funding of the arts and the arguments used to justify it in a public policy context, and the way in which cultural policy overlaps with other areas of public policy-making, in particular social and economic policy. Since 2013 she has been the Director of Studies on the Warwick Commission on the Future of Cultural Value, a large scale public engagement project which aims to develop a research informed, intellectually sound national conversation on the value of the arts and culture and the policy infrastructure required for their flourishing.

Gendered Excellence in the Social Sciences

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26 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Dr Alis Oancea, Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford) Abstract: This talk will describe a research topic that has recently commenced, assessing how gender differences in several disciplines (History, Political Science, Philosophy, Sociology and Economics) might reflect the ways in which feminist and gender research have – or have not – been incorporated into the disciplinary core. Where women are most under-represented (in the PPE disciplines) feminist research is marginalised and gender rarely appears as a key research category in mainstream journals. Initial research suggests that History and Sociology present a contrasting picture. After describing the project I will particularly focus on some on my preliminary findings about Philosophy. About the Speaker: Dr Fiona Jenkins is a senior lecturer in Philosophy at the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University and is the convenor of the ANU Gender Institute. Recent publications include two co-edited books, Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? (OUP 2013) and Allegiance and Identity in a Globalised World (CUP 2014).

Realising and extending Stenhouse's vision of teacher research: the case of history teachers

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26 May 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group and the Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Shakespeare valued?

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21 May 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Velda Elliot, Forum for English, Drama and Media in Education Abstract: What place should Shakespeare have in our classrooms? How do politicians want English teachers to engage with him and his works? And what approaches do we actually approve of? In this interactive session Dr Sarah Olive will talk about her forthcoming book Shakespeare Valued: Education Policy and Pedagogy 1989-2009 as well as inviting attendees to share their thoughts on some of these questions.

Using Twitter as qualitative research data (tbc)

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21 May 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies Abstract: This session will discuss the pleasures and challenges of using twitter to research Shakespeare 'festivals' - in particular, the BBC's 2012 Shakespeare Unlocked season - as part of its public service, educational broadcasting. It will demonstrate ways in which analysing twitter activity concerning the 2012 season sits within a larger project which also draws on television broadcasts, television criticism, advertising and academic writing as sources of qualitative data. It will also invite participants to try their own hands at coding some of the multimodal data.

Agency in disguise: double stimulation in the waiting experiment

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20 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstract: Ambiguous modes of action reveal aspects of the cultural and historical nature of agency which are still largely underscrutinized. A waiting experiment discussed in Vygotsky’s works in connection to his notion of double stimulation provides a useful framework for reflecting on how ambiguous actions can inform today’s theoretical and methodological discussions on agency. The paper presents empirical analyses of data collected in similar experiments carried out after Vygotsky’s descriptions. A subject escorted to a room is told that the experiment will start soon, but the experimenter does not return. Vygotsky’s accounts of these experiments primarily emphasize the seemingly unabiguous action of closure that participants undertake by “leaving” this situation. Complementing and expanding Vygotsky’s original accounts, the analysis presented here illustrates how the seemingly passive action of “staying” can also manifest strong agency. The analysis digs into the ambiguity of this action of staying and shows how participants engage in double stimulation by building on material and social resources and bringing in contents from their lives which transform the experiment into something else. This way participants who stayed, far from manifesting passivity and lack of agency, deliberately “took over” the situation beyond the participation in the experiment in which they remained only peripherally involved. While little attention has been paid to the waiting experiment described by Vygotsky, this analysis indicates its great heuristic potential for developing alternative types of experiments and studies of human action and agency. The waiting experiment points at the significance of exploring what human action and agency look like when researchers distance themselves from the dominant methodological demands of control and predictability. In a way the waiting experiment is an “experiment out of control.” It implies an epistemological posture according to which “control” is conceived primarily to be in the hands of the experimental participants themselves, to allow learning from and with research participants.

Understanding research impact: analysis of the REF impact case studies

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20 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Nuffield College

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/impact-and-knowledge-exchange-seminars For details and to register your interest please email sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk. Abstract: Delivering impact from research has become a central feature of the research policy landscape in the UK and beyond. In this seminar I will consider what is meant by ‘research impact’. I will argue that rather than attempting to define the term we should instead base our understanding on the actual practice of researchers to deliver benefits from their research. I will examine the impact case studies from the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF) as a source on which to build this understanding. About the Speaker: Steven Hill is Head of the Research Policy at the Higher Education Funding Council for England. Prior to joining HEFCE Steven was Head of the Strategy Unit at Research Councils UK, covering a range of research policy issues, and had several roles in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, working on evidence-based policy making. Earlier in his career Steven was a university lecturer at the University of Oxford where his research focussed on plant physiology and biotechnology.

Economic returns to A level mathematics

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19 May 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group Abstract In 1999, Peter Dolton and Anna Vignoles first published their econometric analysis of the 1958 National Child Development Study which showed that A level mathematics was unique in having a wage premium of 7-10% at age 33, for that sample of the population.  In our Nuffield-funded project, Rethinking the Value of Advanced Mathematics Participation, we have replicated the original research and then repeated the analysis with the later 1970 British Cohort Study, using Bayesian modelling and multiple imputation techniques.  In this session we will present the findings from this analysis to show that there appears to  be a sustained ‘return’ to A level mathematics over time, although why this might be is not entirely clear.  Secondly, we present an analysis of how the original research has been taken up by policymakers and what Stephen Ball and Sonia Exley term policy interlockers.  Thirdly, we will set out how this work package fits into the wider project and how the findings raise further questions and new avenues of inquiry.

Advanced structural equation models (SEM): longitudinal and multilevel SEM

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19 May 2015 09:00 - 16:30
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

This follow-up of the introduction to SEM (May 5th, details above) is an advanced course in which we focus on SEM for longitudinal and multilevel data. Prospective longitudinal data is usually collected over longer periods of time (e.g., yearly) while intensive longitudinal is gathered within shorter time-spans (e.g., numerous times a day). Both cross-sectional and longitudinal data can be collected applying a nested structure (e.g., students in classrooms, parents in families, time-points in persons). Using SEM we can model repeated latent constructs over time, or across hierarchical levels net of measurement error. In this course we will start off with analysis of models in which the time-structure is explicit. We will then introduce multilevel structural equation models (MSEM), in which we specify models in which time is not explicitly modelled. We will end with models in which the time-structure is explicit in multilevel data. During the course we will cover worked examples relevant for educational, psychological and social sciences. Participants need to understand the basics of multiple regression, other relevant multivariate statistics, and have some exposure to either multilevel regression or SEM. Contents: 9-10:45 Quick introduction to SEM; Modelling longitudinal data using repeated constructs or time-varying constructs; Models with and without mean-structure; Autoregressive models with latent constructs; Reciprocal effects; The latent change model (for experimental designs). 11-12:30 The latent growth model: Coding of time; Error structures; The autoregressive latent trait model; 13-14:45 Multilevel factor structures; Multilevel structural models (MSEM) with covariates; Centering and contextual effects; Contrasting examples using time-points in students, students in classrooms, and parents in families. 15-16:30 Models for intensive longitudinal data using “individuals as their own controls”; Fixed and random effects models; cross-level interaction effects; Models for explicit time: dynamic factor analysis and intraindividual variability. Course fee: Oxford University Participant (Students, Staff): No charge Other Students: £30 External Other: £100 The course fee includes access to training sessions/events, event materials, lunch and refreshments. The fee does not include accommodation or travel. Registration: Oxford University participants should register via Weblearn. Browse by Department and select Education. Other students and external participants please complete the registration form and return by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk ESRC Student Bursaries: ESRC student bursaries are available to postgraduate students from Higher Education Institutions outside Oxford to provide up to £120 per day financial assistance toward the cost of attending the course. Students will also be able to claim reasonable travel costs within the UK to Oxford, plus reasonable accommodation costs up to £100 per night for the duration of the course. Students must pay upfront for the course and then claim costs back after they have attended, providing receipts for all expenses. Please note: You must be a postgraduate research student at a UK Higher Education Institution to be eligible for bursary funding. If you would like to apply for an ESRC student bursary please complete the ESRC bursary application form and return it by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk together with your registration form.

The comprehensive school (Die Gesamtschule): the anatomy and pathology of secondary school reform in Germany and Austria (Public seminar)

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18 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract: After World War II research evidence grew that the traditional European secondary school structure did not live up to the expectations of democratic societies. Early selection proved psychometrically unreliable, it increased the handicap of lower-class children, it was macro-economically (mobilisation of talent ) and micro-economically (utilisation of local resources) inefficient and there was no justification for curricular and organizational differentiation between different types of schools that could not be provided within a unitary school system. While countries as different as Italy, Sweden and France radically reformed their lower secondary school systems and England began to change the system gradually and regionally, German and Austria embarked on more or less strictly controlled Gesamtschul-“experiments” which in both countries suffered from “creaming”, i.e. parental self-selection through the opting out of ambitious middle class parents from the reform schools. After about a decade the trial programmes “ran out of steam” in the wake of a wider neo-conservative change of the political climate. In neither country the reforms seriously attempted the inclusion of the prestigious “grammar school type” Gymnasium. In Germany the result was – with variations between the educationally autonomous Länder - the establishment of a fourth type of secondary school, in Austria only the non-selective “secondary modern type” Hauptschule was reformed. Neither German reunification (which required an answer to the question what to do with the comprehensive secondary school system inherited from the former DDR) nor the “PISA-shock” triggered by the relatively poor results of German pupils in the first round of the OECD’s international pupil assessment was able to restart a comprehensive school reform debate. In Austria another initiative to establish a comprehensive lower secondary “Neue Mittelschule” resulted again in the retention of the selective binary structure of lower secondary education. There are several answers to the questions why the German speaking world holds on to early selection and why the “ educational apartheid” of lower secondary education is a political taboo. There exists an informal, albeit politically powerful and highly articulate, lobby which considers the Gymnasium as “untouchable” and its continuing existence as “self-evident”, comprising the professional associations of Gymnasium teachers, the conservative parties CDU and CSU ( in Austria the People’s Party OeVP), the Catholic and the Protestant Church which both run prestigious private Gymnasien, many journalists and editors of the quality press and –last but certainly not least - the “Bildungsbuergertum”, the sector of German and Austrian society which define themselves as the guardians of culture, erudition, elaborated language, good taste, the arts – in short “Bildung”. The erosion of the comprehensive school principle in Sweden and in England through the establishment of “free schools” has done little to provide a reform stimulus “from abroad”. From an English point of view it might be of interest to ask why the German language educational research community shares this taboo and why there has never been a German “Re-appraisal of the Comprehensive Ideal” comparable to the one by Richard Pring & colleagues in this country. One reason may be the absence of educational policy analysis as research domain in the German speaking world. About the Speaker: Professor Karl Heinz is emeritus professor of Comparative Education at the Institute of Education of the University of Vienna, Austria. Throughout his academic career he has been observing and analysing the evolution of comprehensive education, predominantly in Sweden, England and Germany, but also in the wider OECD context including the USA and Japan . He has a longstanding relationship with the Oxford University Department of Education as a recurrent academic visitor.

Evaluating effectiveness of education systems and instructional approaches with PISA data

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18 May 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract: This presentation will show results of two research projects: (1) Measuring effectiveness of education systems and (2) Evaluating effectiveness of instructional approaches and differential effectiveness across students, schools and countries. Three-level multilevel models are employed to measure effectiveness of education systems while adjusting for student SES, school SES, and the country's SES. The results offer policy-makers a different perspective of the performance of education systems. Models with main and interactions effects evaluate the effectiveness of different instructional approaches (e.g., teacher-directed instruction, student-oriented instruction, and cognitive activation) for mathematics attainment and whether the approaches work differently for high and low SES students, in schools according to their instructional context, and in countries depending on the level of socio-economic development.

Expert knowledge and policy

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14 May 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies Abstract: 'Capturing Expert Knowledge:  A Delphi Study in the Theatre Industry' 'In Battalions' is a campaign run by doctoral student Helen Campbell Pickford and playwright Fin Kennedy which analyses the effects of arts budget cuts on grassroots theatre companies, particularly in terms of risk-taking and the diversity of new work.  Helen's Delphi Study brought together strategies from across the theatre industry to mitigate the effects of budget cuts and was used to report to the Arts Council and House of Commons in 2014, securing tax breaks for theatres touring new writing.  This session looks at how expert knowledge was generated from professionals working at grassroots level and converted into policy advice via the Delphi study.  It won the Research Impact award for 2014 and was widely reported in the national press: http://www.theguardian.com/stage/theatreblog/2014/jul/11/in-battalions-theatre-blog-arts-funding-policy

Students' transition into the first year at higher education in Switzerland

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13 May 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Hubert Ertl Abstract: In Swiss Higher Education Institutions, all students who obtained the qualification equivalent to A-Levels are automatically accepted for studying. Thus, the first year at university is dominated by an assessment culture, with about 30% of the students not passing the exams. In a longitudinal study, we looked at students' motivational development during their first year at a Swiss university. The results confirm students' "transition as becoming" (Gale & Parker, 2012) and provide insights into possible support measures for first year students. About the speaker: Dr. Taiga Brahm is assistant professor for higher education development at the University of St. Gallen / Switzerland. Her research fields include teaching and learning in higher education, students' transition processes into university as well as integrating sustainable development into curricula.

The cultural value of research: "widening of horizons" or "rhetorical moment"? (Public seminar)

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11 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy Research impact and, by association, cultural value from research are contested concepts, beset by philosophical, practical and political tensions. In the wake of REF 2014, strategies, measures, tools and monitoring systems for research impact and ‘value’ have mushroomed, developing into a form of procedural expertise with high currency in research policy and funding and in institutional strategies and positioning. At the same time, universities have invested in infrastructure aimed at knowledge exchange and network-building processes. In this talk I plan to explore some of these tensions and processes, using a conceptual model derived from four studies based on interviews, network analysis, and textual analysis, and funded between 2010 and 2015 by the AHRC, HEIF, and NIHR. I will illustrate the model with examples of the ways in which those engaged with university-based research (researchers, administrators, partners, beneficiaries) construct and respond to the challenges of interpreting, enacting, and demonstrating the cultural value of research. I ask whether the economies of valuing that shape these responses connect in any meaningful way with wider ecologies of cultural life, creation and understanding; and whether it is at all possible that narratives in cultural terms are no longer perceived as a risk in the current UK research governance system. I will end with a speculative outline of the current axiological landscape for research activity. Dr Alis Oancea is Associate Professor in the Philosophy of Education at OUDE. She has published on philosophy of research, research policy and governance, teacher education, and professional knowledge.  Recent research includes an AHRC-funded study on the cultural value of research (2013-14) and a baseline study for the British Educational Research Association’s Observatory of trends in educational research (2014). Other recent work relevant to this seminar includes a study of indicators and metrics for research impact in clinical medicine (HEIF and NIHR, 2012) and one on practices of impact in STEM, social sciences, and humanities (HEIF, 2011). She is currently completing a HEIF project on knowledge exchange in the social sciences (2013-15) and an in-depth textual analysis of the REF impact case studies and templates submitted by the university. During 2012-13 she was Senior Impact Advisor to the REF project board of the University of Oxford, working across the divisions on developing the impact submission of the university. By the end of the year she hopes to finish a book on cultural value and begin work on a monograph on research governance systems.

Are there distinctive clusters of higher and lower status universities in the UK?

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11 May 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract: In this paper I analyse publicly available data on the research activity, teaching environment, economic resources, academic selectivity and social mix of UK universities to explore how the differentiation of UK universities is structured. In 1992 the binary divide between universities and polytechnics was dismantled to create a nominally unitary system of higher education for the UK. However, the following year saw the publication of the first UK university rankings, and the year after that saw the formation of the Russell Group of self-proclaimed "leading" universities. This paper asks whether UK universities are spread out along a fine-grained linear hierarchy of the sort brought to mind by university rankings, or whether there are distinctive clusters of higher and lower status universities as suggested by the existence of university mission groups such as the Russell Group. In particular the paper asks whether the Russell Group of universities can be said to form a distinctive cluster of leading universities.

Always going back to the transcripts: the strengths and limitations of a grounded approach to analysing qualitative data

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07 May 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies Abstract: The seminar will focus on the qualitative approaches that informed analysis of the data which were collected as part of a longitudinal study of beginning teachers' learning. The project tracked these beginning teachers through a one-year secondary PGCE course and then through the first two years of their teaching career. Thirty-six student teachers were initially recruited to the project from two well-established school/ university partnership schemes. They included 12 student teachers from each of three subject areas, namely mathematics, science and English, the core subjects within the National Curriculum for maintained schools in England. In order to explore their developing thinking and practice, the student teachers were each observed teaching on four occasions across the PGCE year and on three occasions in each of the two subsequent years, and each observation was closely followed by a semi-structured interview probing their thinking about the planning, teaching and evaluation of the lesson. We focused deliberately on specific observed lessons in order to access the thinking that informed their practice, rather than their espoused theories of teaching and learning. The interview schedule was derived from the approach first used by Brown and McIntyre (1993) to help experienced teachers articulate their ‘craft knowledge’ and our aim was to encourage the student teachers to describe and evaluate their teaching in whatever terms they chose. Each participant was also interviewed at the beginning and end of each year of the study.

Multilevel models for educational data

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07 May 2015 09:00 - 16:00
IT Room, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

This one-day workshop will introduce MLM, with a focus on applications and interpretation of results, and provide an overview of MLM for change to model longitudinal data and advanced MLM for non-hierarchical data structures (i.e., cross- classified and multiple membership models). Lectures will be combined with hands-on practical exercises using the software package SPSS. Participants need to understand the basics of multiple regression, or other relevant multivariate statistics. Contents: 09:00-10:30 Introduction to MLM 10:45-12:00 MLM in SPSS 12:30-14:00 MLM for change 14:15-16:00 Advanced MLM: Cross-classified and Multiple membership models Course fee: Oxford University Participant (Students, Staff): No charge Other Students: £30 External Other: £100 The course fee includes access to training sessions/events, event materials, lunch and refreshments. The fee does not include accommodation or travel Registration: Oxford University participants should register via Weblearn. Browse by Department and select Education. Other students and external participants please complete the registration form and return by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk ESRC Student Bursaries: ESRC student bursaries are available to postgraduate students from Higher Education Institutions outside Oxford to provide up to £120 per day financial assistance toward the cost of attending the course. Students will also be able to claim reasonable travel costs within the UK to Oxford, plus reasonable accommodation costs up to £100 per night for the duration of the course. Students must pay upfront for the course and then claim costs back after they have attended, providing receipts for all expenses. Please note: You must be a postgraduate research student at a UK Higher Education Institution to be eligible for bursary funding. If you would like to apply for an ESRC student bursary please complete the ESRC bursary application form and return it by email to lorena.ortega@education.ox.ac.uk together with your registration form.

The concept of drama in Vygotsky’s theory.

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06 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstract: Despite the growing popularity of Vygotsky’s theory, many of its aspects remain insufficiently considered. Understanding Vygotsky’s ideas is to a large extent complicated by the difficulty of the language he uses, which is deeply rooted in the culture of the Russian “Silver Century” and is rather challenging even for a native-speaker. Strange as it might seem, this is true about the notion of drama – which could be perceived as one of the key-concepts of the Cultural Historical Theory. The aim of this talk will be to link the concept of drama to Vygotsky’s theatrical background and to analyze how it is used in the context of his ideas about the development of higher psychological functions. In particular, the concept of drama gives a new perspective to interpreting the Vygotskian idea of the social situation of development. This perspective will be illustrated by a few examples of research with adolescents. About the speaker: Olga Rubtsova graduated from Moscow State Linguistic University where she studied general linguistics and languages. She completed her PhD in Moscow State University of Psychology and Education, conducting research on adolescent crisis and role conflicts of modern teenagers. She is currently Associate Professor of the Department of Educational Psychology and Head of the Centre for Foreign Languages “Psy-Lingua” in Moscow State University of Psychology and Education. Her research interests concern adolescent crisis, formation of role-identity in adolescence and role play games in development and education of adolescents.

In metrics we trust? Impact, indicators & the prospects for social science over the next five years

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06 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Said Business School

Convener: Professor Roger Goodman (Social Sciences Division) and Dr Alis Oancea (Education) for the impact and knowledge exchange in an evolving research environment seminar series https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/impact-and-knowledge-exchange-seminars For details and to register your interest please email  sanja.djerasimovic@education.ox.ac.uk. Abstract: Citations, journal impact factors, H-indices, even tweets and Facebook likes – there are no end of quantitative measures that can now be used to assess the quality and wider impacts of research. But how robust and reliable are such indicators, and what weight – if any – should we give them in the management of the UK’s research system? Over the past year, the Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment and Management has looked in detail at these questions. The review has explored the use of metrics across the full range of academic disciplines, and assessed their potential contribution to processes of research assessment like the REF. It has looked at how universities themselves use metrics, at the rise of league tables and rankings, at the relationship between metrics and issues of equality and diversity, and at the potential for ‘gaming’ that can arise from the use of particular indicators in the funding system. The review’s final report, The Metric Tide, will be published on 9 July. In advance of this, James Wilsdon will use this talk to preview its findings, with a particular focus on opportunities & dilemmas for the social sciences & humanities. The second part of his talk will look at the broader post-election prospects for social science funding & influence within government, building on the Campaign for Social Science's recent report 'The Business of People'. About the Speaker: James Wilsdon is Professor of Science and Democracy at the University of Sussex. He is also a director of The Nexus Network, an ESRC-funded initiative to link research, policy & practice across food, energy, water and the environment. In 2013, Prof Wilsdon became chair of the Campaign for Social Science, which works to make the case for UK social science with policymakers, the media and the wider public. He led the working group for the Campaign's pre-election report The Business of People, published in February 2015, and in 2014 he was asked by HEFCE to chair an independent review of the role of metrics in research assessment, which will publish its final report in July 2015. Prof Wilsdon is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. His other affiliations are with the University of Cambridge’s Centre for Science and Policy, University of Colorado’s Centre for Science and Technology Policy, Science and Democracy Network, and CISTRAT (International Research and Training Centre for Science and Technology Strategy) in Beijing. His past experience includes being the founding director of the Science Policy Centre at the Royal Society, head of strategy at the public policy think tank Demos, and a senior policy advisor at the sustainability NGO Forum for the Future.

England and Turkey: a comparative study of religious education

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05 May 2015 17:00 - 18:30

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch), jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum.

Introduction to structural equation models (SEM)

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05 May 2015 09:00 - 16:30

The concept of a latent construct is central in the social sciences. A latent construct is a not directly observed phenomenon (e.g., attitude, socioeconomic status) that we can model using manifest (observed) variables (e.g., survey and questionnaire responses, observation scores), by partitioning out residual (i.e., uniqueness, error variance). The structural equation model (SEM) is divided into two parts. In the measurement part of the model, we can inspect whether manifest variables measure the constructs they are intended to measure. This model is called confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) which allows the researcher to test whether an a priori model fits data, and whether this also holds across multiple groups. If measurement is satisfactory, the relationships between constructs can be estimated in the structural part of the SEM. Complex relationships between manifest variables and/or latent constructs can be tested in path-models not possible to specify in the multiple regression framework. During the course we will cover worked examples relevant for educational, psychological and social sciences. Participants need to understand the basics of multiple regression, or other relevant multivariate statistics. Contents:  9-10:45 Introduction: Basic concepts, models and measurement. From multiple regression to path-models using manifest variables. 11-12:30 Observed (manifest) variables and unobserved (latent) constructs. Specification of measurement models for testing quality of measurement, using continuous and dichotomous manifest variables. Goodness-of-fit indices. 13-14:45 Relationships between latent constructs. Specifying structural models to include directional (regression) paths between latent constructs. 15-16:30 Multiple group designs and testing of invariance constraints. Modelling intercepts and latent means. Registration: *COURSE FULLY BOOKED* 

Being a religious education teacher in the digital age: professional identity in online social space

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28 April 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch), jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum. Abstract As the world around us becomes ever more dominated by technology, online social spaces increasingly provide key opportunities for teachers to engage with subject specific peers about their professional practice.  Using data gathered through a year-long digital ethnography of three online social spaces used by Religious Education teachers, this paper discusses what it means to be an RE teacher in the digital age.  It will be argued that engagement in online social spaces can disrupt traditional modes of professionalism and provide opportunities for RE teachers to perform and construct identity in increasingly national and politicised contexts in a way that has the potential to challenge existing structures that dominate the subject. About the speaker Dr James Robson completed his DPhil in Oxford University’s Department of Education in 2014, where he undertook a digital ethnography investigating Religious Education teachers’ engagement in online social space.  He is currently the Coordinator for the Learning and New Technologies Research Group at Oxford University and teaches on the Learning and Technology MSc in Education.  He is the Knowledge and Online Manager at Culham St Gabriel’s where he manages the trust’s Religious Education research agenda and suite of technology related educational resources.  He sits on the DfE funded Expert Advisory Group for RE and the RE Teacher Recruitment Strategy Steering Group as a social media expert.

What is educational neuroscience? (Public seminar)

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27 April 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Parenting practices predictive of children’s self-regulation development: evidence from the UK

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27 April 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room E

Conveners: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract: Children’s ability to exercise self-regulation is a key predictor of academic, behavioral, and life outcomes, but the developmental dynamics of children’s self-regulation in early childhood are not yet adequately understood. Using data drawn from the Millennium Cohort Study in the UK, we investigate how harsh and sensitive parenting practices affect the development of children’s self-regulation from the age of 3 to 7, as well as how children’s self-regulation reciprocally affects parenting practices. The results from a latent growth analysis indicate that harsh parenting predicts lower initial self-regulation level, whereas sensitive parenting predicts a higher initial level. Moreover, a bidirectional relationship was observed whereby early harsh parenting predicted lower subsequent self-regulation, which then predicted higher harsh parenting and vice versa.

Educational processes: theoretical and conceptual models

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19 March 2015 10:00 - 16:00

Ethics and methods in exploring children’s lives: experiences from Young Lives

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12 March 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies Ginny joined Young Lives (www.younglives.org) in January 2011 as Deputy Director. Her research focuses on children’s work in developed and developing countries, sociological approaches to the study of childhood and children’s rights, the ethics of social research with children, children’s understandings of family, and children and ‘social capital’. She has published extensively, and has been a member of numerous Advisory Groups and Research Ethics Committees. She has been co-editor of Childhood: A Journal of Global Child Research since 2006.

OSAT Reading Group

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11 March 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Reading: Wells, G (2011) Integrating CHAT and action research Mind, Culture, and Activity Volume 18, Issue 2, 2011 Special Issue: Cultural-Historical Activity Theory and Action Research, pp 161-180

OSAT Reading Group

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11 March 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Reading: Wells, G (2011) Integrating CHAT and action research Mind, Culture, and Activity Volume 18, Issue 2, 2011 Special Issue: Cultural-Historical Activity Theory and Action Research, pp 161-180

FELL/Child Learning Research Group seminar

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11 March 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Teaching as moral injury: the ethics of educational injustice

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10 March 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch) and Religion, Philosophy and Education Forum joint seminar programme Please email alis.oancea@education.ox.ac.uk if you have any inquiries. Abstract: Consider a case study of school personnel who must decide whether to expel a fourteen year-old student for bringing marijuana onto campus. The case enables us to explore a class of ethical dilemmas in which educators are obligated to take action that fulfills the demands of justice, but have to do so under conditions in which no just action is possible because of contextual and school-based injustices. Under such circumstances, educators suffer moral injury: the trauma of perpetrating significant moral wrong against others despite one’s wholehearted desire and responsibility to do otherwise. Educators often try to avoid moral injury in intrinsically unjust contexts by engaging in loyal subversion, using their voice to protest systemic injustices, or exiting the school setting altogether. No approach, however, enables educators adequately to fulfill their obligation to enact justice and hence to escape moral injury. Although it is educators who suffer the moral injury, it is society that owes them moral repair—most importantly, by restructuring educational and other social systems so as to mitigate injustice. In assuming these obligations, society must also collaborate with experienced educators who have insights to cut through what otherwise appear to be intractable normative challenges. As a methodological point, case studies of dilemmas of justice may enable philosophers, educators, and members of the general public to engage in grounded reflection as a means of achieving phronetic equilibrium, thus further reducing moral injury and enhancing educators’ capacities to enact justice in schools. About the speaker: Meira Levinson is an associate professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, following eight years as an eighth grade teacher in the Atlanta and Boston Public Schools.  She is the author of No Citizen Left Behind (Harvard University Press, 2012), which has won awards from the National Council for the Social Studies, American Educational Studies Association, American Political Science Association, and North American Society for Social Philosophy.  Her other publications include The Demands of Liberal Education, the coauthored Democracy at Risk, the co-edited Making Civics Count, and over 30 scholarly and popular articles and book chapters. Levinson earned a DPhil in political theory from Nuffield College, Oxford, and her BA in philosophy from Yale University.  She is spending this year at Nuffield College as a Guggenheim Fellow, writing case studies, articles, and a book about dilemmas of justice in schools.  The project is intended to give educators tools for making just decisions in their own practice, and also to push political theorists to develop theories of justice that are robust enough to address complex school-based dilemmas.  This project, like her previous research, reflects Levinson’s commitment to achieving productive cross-fertilization—without loss of rigor—among scholarship, policy, and practice.

Automatic translation in bilingual processing (Public Seminar)

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09 March 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Xin Wang, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Environmental risk and promoting factors of educational achievement amongst black South African youth: an educational resilience approach

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09 March 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

FELL/Child Learning Research Groups seminar

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04 March 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Does being in care provide protection or increase risk? Understanding the outcomes of children in care (Public Seminar)

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02 March 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, Rees Centre for Research in Fostering and Education

Equitable progress? The role of school quality in shaping learning gaps: a comparative study of two developing countries (Ethiopia and Vietnam)

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02 March 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Everyday life inside a girls’ Madrassa: junctures and framings

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26 February 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly Abstract: This seminar will discuss ethnographic fieldwork conducted at a girls madrassa in Delhi, India. After one year in the field, Hem discusses her journey as a participant observer and challenges around negotiating ongoing access and working with young girls. The second part of her presentation will revolve around the portrait of one student and draws attention to some of the key motifs that emerged during fieldwork: everyday life changing moments, relationships, transitions, contesting dilemmas, competing choices, constraints and aspirations. She discusses how these motifs enabled her to provide an ethnographically rich and nuanced account of how girls’ understand, experience and embody their ongoing education.

Sentient schools: educational institutions as software-supported big data platforms and sensing environments

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25 February 2015 17:00 -
Seminar Roon G/H

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract: Along with imaginings of the future of the ‘smart city,’ an urban environment highly mediated and augmented by information and communication technologies, the idea of the ‘smart school’ is emerging as part of re-imaginings of the future of education. Various organizations and actors have begun to produce materials envisaging education as a smart, sensor-enabled, software-mediated, data-driven, and computationally-programmable social institution. This presentation will argue that smart schools are emerging ‘fabricated spaces’ being formed out of a mixture of technological fantasies and related technical developments. Such spaces are to be managed and governed through processes written in computer code and proceduralized in algorithms. By interrogating these fantasies of smart, sentient schools, it is possible to discern how particular educational futures are being fashioned, and how schools and students are to be governed. Drawing on a variety of materials, the presentation will survey the key features of emerging smart schools: ⎯ the seemingly ‘sentient’ infrastructures that underpin them
⎯ the constant flows of data smart schools depend on
⎯ students as nodes in ‘learning networks’ whose behaviours can be nudged and tweaked through network effects
⎯ sensor devices, including activity monitors, RFID tags and ID cards, to track and monitor student activities and movements
⎯ students as ‘computational operatives’ who must ‘learn to code’ in order to become ‘smart citizens’ in the digital governance of the smart city
⎯ techniques of dataveillance that enable student data to be used to anticipate their behaviours and pre-empt their futures Significantly, these features are characteristic of a new technocratic way of conceptualizing educational practices and spaces—related to an emerging style of ‘political computational thinking’—and of emerging modes of both ‘real-time’ and ‘future-tense’ digital education governance. About the Speaker Dr Ben Williamson is a lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Stirling. His research focuses on digital technologies and educational governance, with particular interests in the participation of think tanks, policy labs and third sector organizations in education policy, and in the emergence of new forms of technologically-mediated ‘digital education governance.’ This presentation will draw on the ESRC funded Code Acts in Education project that Ben is currently leading (http://codeactsineducation.wordpress.com/about/).

Factors contributing to mathematical achievement: conceptual and procedural knowledge in fractions skills

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25 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Good habits of the mind: investigating the normative role for intellectual virtue in mathematics education.

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24 February 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group in conjunction with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch) Abstract In educational philosophy, much has been written on virtue ethics and its role in moral education, with an emphasis on the moral virtues in the development of character. There is, moreover, a growing literature on the intellectual virtues in education, with emphasis placed predominantly on their role in critical thinking and the cultivation of dispositions essential to the education of critical thinkers. However, little has been written on how the intellectual virtues, as good habits of the mind, might apply to specific curriculum areas and the role they ought to play to foster intellectual engagement and, hence, excellent teaching and learning. In this seminar I start from an account of the intellectual virtues developed by Hugh Sockett (2012) in which he stresses the overall importance of truthfulness, accuracy, open-mindedness and impartiality. These virtues can be considered as the enabling traits that dispose one to think critically and to engage intellectually with one’s learning. In investigating how these virtues might apply to mathematics education, I consider the normative implications that flow from a commitment to the premise that their cultivation is a key attribute of intellectual engagement in that field.

Mathematics Education Reading Group

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24 February 2015 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Mathematics Education Research Group (MERG) Readings Yang, K-L., Hsu, H-Y., Lin, F-L., Chen, J-C., & Cheng, Y-H., (2015). Exploring the educative power of an experienced mathematics teacher educator-researcher  Educational Studies in Mathematics Lundin, Sverker (2012). Hating school,loving mathematics: On the ideological function of critique and reform in mathematics education. Educational Studies in Mathematics 80: 73-85

The Youth Initiative Programme: results of research into social exclusion

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24 February 2015 14:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Harry Daniels Speakers: Ted Cole, Harry Daniels, Rebecca Eynon, Lucinda Ferguson, Steve Strand, Ian Thompson and Naomi Webber Panel members (confirmed): John Coleman, Hilary Emery, Phillipa Stobbs and Klaus Wedell. It is impossible to ignore the existence of young people who are at risk of social exclusion i.e. not being able to access or contribute to what society can offer them. They present economic and social problems for society but they also, often tragically, experience limited life opportunities which do nothing to break the cycle of deprivation. The target group is far from homogeneous; disability, poverty and race intersect in different ways to restrict the opportunities available to them. The long-term intention is to establish an interdisciplinary Research Centre, in the Division of Social Sciences, which will focus on the lives of the most disadvantaged young people. The Centre’s approach will be to interpret problems of exclusion and under-performance as multi-faceted, requiring inter-disciplinary analyses and inter-professional responses at the level of both practice and policy. Social Sciences at Oxford are well-placed to undertake these analyses and present them in the relevant policy arena. Indeed it could be argued that focusing on the most needy should be a significant element in Oxford’s research profile. This symposium provides an overview of the research activities that were funded by anonymous donor and those that have developed from within this initiative. We are also very pleased to welcome a panel of key stakeholders in the field who will discuss possibilities for future direction in this field. For further information and a draft programme of this event, please contact Phil Richards

Education, language and the social brain (Public Seminar)

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23 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels (OSAT) Abstract: In recent years, researchers in evolutionary psychology and anthropology have proposed that we have evolved with “social brains” that enable us to manage complex social relationships. Research in neuroscience also encourages the view that humans have a distinctively social form of intelligence. I suggest that the concept of the social brain is potentially useful for understanding the dynamic, iterative relationship between individual thinking and social activity, and the role of language in mediating that relationship. This gives the concept educational relevance. However, I argue that its current conceptualization is too individualistic; it needs to be redefined to take account of the distinctive human capacity for thinking collectively. Vygotskian sociocultural theory and empirical research derived from it offer a useful basis for this reconceptualization, enabling a better understanding of the relationship between “intermental” activity and “intramental’ and hence the processes of teaching and learning. Finally, I consider the implications of this reconceptualization of the social brain for educational theory, research and practice. About the speaker: Neil Mercer is Professor of Education at the University of Cambridge, where he is also Chair of the Psychology and Education Group and Vice-President of the college Hughes Hall. Previously, he was Professor of Language and Communications at the Open University. He is a psychologist with particular interests in the development of children’s language and reasoning, classroom talk, and the application of digital technology in schools. His research with colleagues generated the Thinking Together practical approach to classroom pedagogy, and he has worked extensively with teachers, researchers and educational policy makers on improving talk for learning in schools. His most recent books are Exploring Talk in School (with Steve Hodgkinson) and Dialogue and the Development of Children’s Thinking and Interthinking: putting talk to work (both with Karen Littleton).

Perceptions of teacher self-efficacy in 14 OECD countries

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23 February 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

"Everyone's got a story": Exploring young people's learning experiences in a youth programme in South East England

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19 February 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James Relly, Director of Doctoral Studies This seminar will describe a qualitative, multi-method case study of a youth programme in inner city London and the south east, and the participation and educational experiences of young people in different youth centres, initiatives and group activities. The write-up of the research was structured as a Bildungsroman, literally meaning a novel or narrative account of youth, development and growth. A common thread describing 'development' from different perspectives was applied to analyse young people’s participation and learning experiences in the programme, youth workers’ life experiences and professional development, how the programme itself had appeared to progress and mature over time and my experience as a researcher over the course of the study.

Provision of parenting services in children's centres

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18 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

OSAT Reading Group

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18 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Reading: Neil Mercer (2013) The social brain, language, and goal-directed collective thinking: a social conception of cognition and its implications for understanding how we think, teach, and learn Educational Psychologist, 48:3, 148-168.

Discrete or continuous change: Can a dynamic representation facilitate development of reasoning in mathematics?

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17 February 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Jenni Ingram, Mathematics Education Research Group Abstract: In order to investigate how students develop the concept of inclusivity between classes of 2D shapes I used a Design Based Research method to develop and refine a task, based on a dynamic figure, which students dragged to generate different triangles and quadrilaterals. Pairs of 13 year old students and one whole teaching group worked with the dynamic figure whilst their dialogue and on-screen activity were recorded.  A number of themes emerged from the data, in particular the importance of symmetry in how the students generated the shapes. This was evident when students  dragged to maintain the symmetry (DMS) of the figure, a strategy with the potential to mediate the concept of a ‘dragging family’ of shapes. As such DMS is a ‘dragging utilisation scheme’ in the Vygotskyan sense. However, in order to move towards this understanding it is necessary that students perceive dragging activity on the figure as an action resulting in a continuously changing figure which morphs through an infinite number of shapes. I describe how I used an animation of the figure under DMS as the catalyst to move the students’ thinking towards the ‘dragging family’. My findings suggest that enabling students to view change through continuous rather than discrete representations helped to develop inclusive thinking.

Employer ownership of the skills agenda - what, who and how?

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17 February 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room D

Convener: Professor Ewart Keep, Director, SKOPE In order to register please contact Emma Miller at emma.miller@education.ox.ac.uk

Mobile learning in global health training: What about social justice? (Public Seminar)

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16 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract: Niall will discuss emerging findings from the ESRC/DFID-funded project "mCHW: a mobile learning intervention for community health workers” (http://www.mchw.org). The talk will present the background to the project and position his research at the intersection of education, health, technology and social justice. Niall will present his joint research with Anne Geniets on the framing of global health training with technology from a social justice perspective (Winters & Geniets, in submission). Critiquing ICT for development, he will set out to show how the design, development and implementation of training projects are radically altered when centred on a preferential option for the poor. He will  then discuss the social justice framing in the context of the mCHW project’s empirical work in Kenya, drawing out three key implications: (1) Designing and evaluation applications for the needs of the poor; (2) Redefining the nature of ‘appropriate technologies’ and (3) Implementing pragmatic solidarity, which means developing common cause with those in need in a very practical and realistic manner.    

Quantitative Methods Hub seminar

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16 February 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Nurturing resilience to risks: the role of high quality education

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11 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups  

Education in Sudan: past and present

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10 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Pavilion Room, St. Antony's College

Convener: David Johnson    

Late have I loved you: Beauty, truth and goodness in the design of learning: St Augustine as curriculum designer for the postmodern era?

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10 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch), jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum. Abstract This seminar will argue that current curriculum design in several school curriculum subjects lacks an ontology. By referring to subjects such as RE and Citizenship, and elements such as spiritual, moral and social development, I shall seek to establish that the epistemological foundations of these curriculum elements are weak, and require a stronger theoretical rationale based in a longstanding and complex understanding of human existence. Consulting the 5th-century  African philosopher, theologian and teacher St Augustine, and learning from his unofficial trinity of beauty, truth and goodness, I shall seek to sketch out a possible design theory for knowledge in the curriculum of our own era, an era both different from, and similar to his own. About the speaker Mark Chater is Director of Culham St Gabriel’s Trust, an educational charity supporting research, development and innovation in school-based Religious Education in the UK. A qualified teacher, Mark taught RE in British comprehensive schools for ten years before becoming a researcher and teacher trainer. He gained his Doctorate in 1997 with a thesis on the changing relationship between confessional and secular rationales for RE. For four years he was the national adviser for RE with the civil service. He is co-author of Teaching the Primary Curriculum, (2002), Developing Teaching Skills in the Primary School, (2007), Mole Under the Fence: Conversations with Fr Roland Walls, (2006) and Does Religious Education have a Future? (2013). He is working on Jesus Christ, Learning Teacher: Where theology meets pedagogy (due 2015). Numerous journal articles and official civil service documents have focused on the nature and purpose of RE, spirituality and values in education, school leadership, and the challenge of raising standards in RE. Mark is passionate about improving RE, resolving its longstanding weaknesses and working collaboratively across belief and national boundaries.

Evidence-informed educational practice for children in care

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10 February 2015 16:30 -
Webinar

Conveners: Alun Rees and Lucy Wawrzyniak, Visiting Research Fellows, the Rees Centre. For further information see the Rees Centre events page

The evidence-informed educational practice for children in care

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10 February 2015 16:30 -
Webinar

Convener: Professor Judy Sebba, Rees Centre for Research in Fostering and Education

Language development in internationally-adopted children: a special case of very early second language learning (Public Seminar)

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09 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics Research Group Abstract: Internationally-adopted children are a special case of very early second language acquisition – they discontinue acquisition of the birth language at adoption at which time they learn and use only the second language. They raise a number of important and interesting issues with respect to language learning and loss: “Is a very early acquired ‘second language’ acquired like a first or like a second language?; “What are the underlying explanations for differences in early second language versus first language acquisition?”; “Is a first language completely lost when exposure to and use of that language terminates?”.  In this talk, I will present longitudinal behavioral results of a 10-year longitudinal study of internationally-adopted children from China in comparison to matched monolingual control children indicating that they differ from monolinguals. I will also present data suggesting that gaps in their acquisition of their “second first language” is related to underlying lags in verbal memory. Finally, some recent fMRI data will be presented that reveal whether they actually entirely lose their birth language and whether the adopted language is processed in the same way as that of native-speaking monolinguals.

Modelling time-lags and instability of primary school students’ learning experiences

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09 February 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Expanding the possible: people and technologies

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04 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract:  Within this presentation Rosamund will draw on sociocultural theory in order to argue that human action is mediated by social, institutional and cultural factors, which include the technologies that have been invented by humans in order to transform our abilities to achieve and perform.  She will argue that if digital technologies are available resources, then it is important that young people learn how to convert these resources into what Sen calls capabilities, that is, opportunities that can be realised in action.  She will suggest that one of the roles of schools is to teach young people to convert digital resources into capabilities, and argue that teachers are constrained from doing this by the school system. About the Speaker:  Rosamund Sutherland  is Professor of Education at the University of Bristol and was formerly Head of the Graduate School of Education. Her research has been concerned with teaching and learning in schools with a particular emphasis on mathematics education and the role of digital technologies in learning. In 2013 she published Education and Social Justice in a Digital Age, in which she challenges policy and practice by presenting a coherent argument about the ways in which the school system should change in order to address issues of education and social justice.    

Project report reception: teaching mathematical reasoning - probability and problem solving in primary school

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04 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Examining three interdependent transitional processes as mediating child language brokering in schools.

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04 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstract After migrating to a new country children often learn the local country language faster than their parents. Consequently, increasing numbers of children and young people contribute to family life by interpreting and translating for family members and peers/friends. They may do more than literal word-for-word translation by also acting as cultural and linguistic mediators between their families and professionals, like teachers, and as such, can be termed child language brokers (CLBs). This presentation will report on a study supported by the Nuffield Foundation that collected data from teachers, and young adults who acted as language brokers in school as children (Ex-CLBs), to examine their perspectives and develop evidence-based guidance on this activity. As well as providing an overview of some of the key findings, this presentation will look at the theoretical concept of transition as three interdependent mediational processes (Zittoun, 2008). The three processes will be (i) identity processes, (ii) knowledge acquisition and (iii) sense-making. This will lead to an exploration of CLB’s positioning of their brokering practice in relation to teachers, the school context, parents and peers. About the speakers Dr. Sarah Crafter is a Senior Research Officer in the Thomas Coram Research Unit at UCL Institute of Education, University of London. Her broad areas of interest are around children and young people’s identity development and constructions of childhood in culturally diverse settings. Her work is underpinned by sociocultural theorising. As well as studying in the area of child language brokering, her research has encompassed children’s work, young caring, home-school mathematics and constructions of children’s mental health spaces. ​

Lost decades in Japan's education: impacts of the narrative of 'playing catchup with the West'

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03 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Pavilion Room, St. Antony's College

Convener: David Johnson    

Modalities and mechanisms of effective school inspections (Public Seminar)

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02 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar room A

Convener: Professor Pam Sammons, Families, Effective Learning & Literacy Research Group    

Is this the right room for an argument?

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02 February 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Integrating learning and supervision of Community Health Volunteers in Kenya to improve health of communities through mobile phone technology

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29 January 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Niall Winters and Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract:  This talk will explore from a Kenyan perspective the process and the challenges of developing and implementing a mobile health learning intervention – the mCHW project (http://www.mchw.org) - in two marginalized communities in Kenya. Since the launch of the Kenyan Government’s Community Strategy in 2006, Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) have become a pillar to the provision of primary health services such as health education in Kenya. CHVs’ practices range from treating common ailments and injuries to making referrals and raising awareness in the community about health issues. Continuous training and support through supervision of these first-line providers of health is paramount to improving the quality of care provided, and integration of these elements especially for marginalised groups is critical. The overarching aim of the mCHW project is to understand the role of mobile interventions in the training and supervision of CHVs working with marginalised communities in Kenya with a special focus on child development - a training priority identified by the CHVs in both communities. Unlike many mobile learning tools, the mCHW project’s REFER mobile app that uses the MDAT (Malawi Development Assessment Tool) protocol to support referral decision making by CHVs was collaboratively designed by CHVs and their supervisors to assess and refer developmentally challenged under-5 children for specialised care. In the talk, we will present the process of developing and implementing this mobile learning tool to integrate learning and supervision of the CHVs in both communities, and will illustrate how the intervention has resulted in changes of practice.

FELL/Child Learning Research Groups seminar

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28 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Design matters? The effects of new schools on students', teachers' and parents' actions and perceptions

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28 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson, (OSAT)

Why civic education matters for democratic transition: A discussion about the cultivation of liberal knowledge and values in Iran and other repressive regimes

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27 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Pavilion Room, St. Antony's College

Convener: David Johnson    

From critical thinking to intellectual virtue

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27 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch), jointly hosted with the Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum. Abstract Philosophy prides itself on its ability to teach students how to think. In teaching students 'critical thinking', philosophy believes that it serves the academy by straightening out students' thinking. It is for this reason that large (often first-year) courses in critical thinking (or 'reasoning', 'argumentation' or 'informal logic') are often presented as service courses across the university. Evidence whether such courses work, however, is mixed. While high performance on a standard critical thinking course can show mastery of specific critical thinking skills, it does not necessarily demonstrate critical thinking in life in general or - importantly - whether students are inclined to think critically in their lives outside the classroom. With this in mind, the critical thinking movement has begun to study critical thinking behaviours or dispositions in addition to ability at critical thinking. In this talk I discuss what it means to be 'disposed to think critically'. While the field is heading in the right direction, I hold that a focus on dispositions or behaviours is still insufficient to capture what we really expect of students' personal growth towards becoming critical thinkers. Rather than critical thinking skills (and the inclination to apply these skills), I shall hold that students need to develop a number of intellectual virtues. I will sketch what the study of intellectual virtue can contribute in this area and will show how the study of critical thinking should shift focus from studying skills to studying the people who have them. About the speaker Ben Kotzee is Lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Birmingham. He works on applying insights from contemporary epistemology to questions regarding intellectual character development. He has written on the epistemic aims of education and on the nature and development of expertise; he is the editor of Education and the Growth of Knowledge: perspectives from social and virtue epistemology (Wiley Blackwell, 2014).

The death of human capital: why there are no exceptions (Public Seminar)

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26 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels (OSAT) Abstract: Human capital theory has dominated the understanding of the relationship of education to work. It has retained plausibility until now due to the social context in which it was articulated. But that context has now changed, radically. It is now exposed as a fundamentally flawed account of the education-economy relationship, theoretically and empirically. This seminar will explain why that is the case and how we move forward with a new account. About the speaker: Hugh Lauder is Professor of Education and Political Economy at the University of Bath and Acting Director, The Institute for Policy Research.  Hugh studied at the University of London, (The Institute of Education) and gained his Doctorate at the University of Canterbury (NZ). He was formerly Dean of Education at Victoria University of Wellington. He specialises in the relationship of education to the economy and for over 10 years has worked on comparative studies of national skill strategies. More recently he has worked on the global skill strategies of multinational companies with Phillip Brown. He is Editor of the Journal of Education and Work.

Poverty and children’s vocabulary development in Ethiopia

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26 January 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Effectiveness of iPad technology in supporting early learning: Critical evidence base

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21 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Roon G

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract
: In this talk Nicola will describe an exciting programme of research that is exploring the use of innovative mobile technology to support the acquisition of basic skills (numeracy, literacy, English) by primary school children in Malawi and the UK. Nicola is carrying out this work in partnership with the charities onebillion (https://onebillion.org.uk/) and Voluntary Service Overseas. It addresses the ‘grand challenges’ concerning education and disadvantage, notably those outlined in the 2015 Millennium Development goals for Malawi. It will describe the innovative mobile technology interventions developed by onebillion and will discuss the evaluation studies designed and conducted to assess their effectiveness. The focus will be particularly on vulnerable children and how these interventions can support their particular learning needs. The results of these studies provide the critical evidence base that is required prior to scale up. Nicola will conclude by considering the implications of this research for practitioners and policy makers. About the Speaker: Dr Nicola Pitchford is an Associate Professor in the School of Psychology at The University of Nottingham, UK. Her research expertise lies in the field of developmental neuropsychology, more specifically how the cognitive processes that underpin scholastic progression develop over childhood. Nicola works at the interface of theory and practice. She collaborates with academics from different disciplines (e.g. psychology, medicine, education) and works with practitioners and professionals from a diverse range of fields (e.g. neurologists, neonatologists, oncologists, nurses, educators, companies, charities, non-government organisations, and government officials). Nicola’s most recent research is exploring the use of innovative mobile technology to support the acquisition of basic skills (numeracy, literacy, English) by primary school children in Malawi and the UK. This exciting programme of work is being carried out in partnership with the charities onebillion (https://onebillion.org.uk/) and Voluntary Service Overseas. The evaluation studies she has designed and conducted, both in Malawi and the UK, have led to global interest following BBC coverage, as her research formed the subject of a BBC Click documentary that was also released on BBC Worldwide News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-29063614). Nicola is also Guest Editor for open access scientific journal, Frontiers in Psychology, which is currently publishing a collection of papers reporting on “Using technology to revolutionise learning: Assessment, intervention, evaluation and historical perspectives” (http://journal.frontiersin.org/ResearchTopic/2611). http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/psychology/people/nicola.pitchford

OSAT Reading Group

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21 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Reading Shotter, G. (1993) The Social Negotiation of Semiotic Meaning. New Ideas in Psychology, 11:10: 61-75.

FELL/Child Learning Research Groups seminar

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21 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Too pale and stale: the politics of prescribed texts in the teaching of culturally diverse students in Australia and England

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20 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Pavilion Room, St. Antony's College

Convener: David Johnson    

Am I a critical realist?

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20 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (Oxford branch) Abstract The paper arises from the recent invitation of Roy Bhaskar ('A Critical Introduction to Contemporary Philosophy') to address his international conference on Critical Realism. Since I did not know what a critical realist is, I was puzzled as to what to say. Hence, this paper is an attempt to find out what critical realism is and whether I am one. Unfortunately Roy has since died and therefore can no longer give judgment. I therefore leave open to the audience to decide whether I should be let into that distinguished club. About the speaker Director of Dept. of Educational Studies, 1989-2003; Lead Director of Nuffield Review 14-19 Education and Training 2003-2009; 'Life and Death of Secondary Education for All', 2013; Third and much rewritten edition of 'Philosophy of Educational Research', 2014; Paperback edition of 'John Dewey; philosopher of education for the 21st century', 2014.

Production tasks underestimate the grammatical abilities of sequential bilingual children (Public Seminar)

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19 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Victoria Murphy, Applied Linguistics Research Group

How to measure PhD students’ conceptions of academic writing and are they related to well-being?

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19 January 2015 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Former FELL interns return to present their research projects

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10 December 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Toddlers' transition to early childhood education and care: the role of security of attachment and caregiver interaction

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03 December 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

Thinking beyond the straits of reason

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02 December 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Liam Gearon and Dr Alis Oancea, Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

Knowledge, learning, pedagogy and practice: using Activity Theory to explore partnership in parenting services

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02 December 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstract This seminar is based on findings from a year-long ethnographic study of a residential parenting service in Sydney. Up to ten families stay at Karitane every week, for help in addressing challenges relating to parenting children from birth to 4 years of age. The service has adopted the Family Partnership Model (FPM), an approach that emphasises joint expertise, mutual respect, negotiation and power sharing between professionals and parents. Rather than solving problems for families, partnership promotes strengths-based approaches to build confidence and resilience in families, who are often from complex disadvantaged backgrounds. My analysis frames partnership in terms of workplace learning and parenting pedagogies: staff learn about and with families, and positive change in families is realised through pedagogic processes. Drawing on activity theory, I will explore: (1) the ZPD in relation to pitching the level of challenge and appropriate immediate and longer-term goals in working with families; (2) ‘nano-pedagogies’, in-the-moment interactions that draw on professional expertise, remain faithful to partnership, and which contribute to lasting positive change (3) relational agency, particularly as traced through handovers between staff, highlighting the collaboration underpinning emergent understandings of how best to support and challenge parents during their stay, and what will work for them when they return home. In doing so I bring Activity Theory into connection with (other) practice theories that highlight knowing as an emergent, material and embodied accomplishment, and learning as establishing, maintaining, repairing and restoring connectedness in action. Through this I trace how professionals work with knowledge that is incomplete, contingent, and uncertain. About the Speaker Nick Hopwood is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Technology, Sydney. He completed his postgraduate research at Oxford’s Department of Education, focusing on geography and environmental education in secondary schools. He then worked on the Next Generation of Social Scientists research programme, drawing on Activity Theory to understand doctoral education with a particular emphasis on workplace learning relationships and embodiment. Since joining UTS he has been focused on partnerships between professionals and parents (see abstract above), and on simulation pedagogies in university settings.

Profiling STEM Enrichment Programmes

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02 December 2014 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Judith Hillier, Science Education Research, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Reconceptualising the primary MFL 'diet': an early start to French literacy

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02 December 2014 13:30 -
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Xin Wang, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Contrasting the dynamics of English and Finnish education policy-making (Public seminar)

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01 December 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar room A

Convener: Professor Jenny Ozga, Europeanisation Abstract: The presentation aims to understand and contrast the dynamics in English and Finnish education policy-making. Dynamics are understood as patterns of interaction between the main policy actors embedded in the socio-historical contexts in the two countries. Data is drawn from 16 theme interviews with key policymakers in England complemented with a body of official documents. The Finnish data is based on earlier research projects, their results and policymaker theme interview data used in them. The English education policy-making on the surface level reflects a rather reactionary dynamics, following earlier theories of policy entrepreneurs seizing opportunities. On a deeper level, policy-making is guided by an institutional structure created over the course of history: centralisation of power to the Department for Education and a shift of balance in consulting from formal or professional organisations to think tanks and political advisors, and the ascendancy of Ofsted as a political actor in education policy. Finnish education policy-making dynamics is restricted by radical municipal autonomy, consensus-supporting decision-making system, and a bureaucratic tradition all which buffer against rapid changes and result in a continuity of the comprehensive school. In policy-making, the relations of the English actors are conflictual whereas in Finland they are consensual. In both context there seemed to be a governance gap between the central and local administration. The difference in the processes of centralisation seemed to explain change potential. The main difference in dynamics is the fluidity of the education institutions, particularly school types. In England, the changing political emphasis has changed the basic organisation of schooling, while in Finland changes took place inside the comprehensive school institute. About the Speaker: Dr Jaakko Kauko is Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Helsinki, currently working on the Finnish Research Council-funded project Transnational Dynamics in Quality Assurance and Evaluation Politics of Basic Education in Brazil, China and Russia (BCR) 2014–2017 and as Team leader of Team 1 in  the Nordic Centre of Excellence Justice through Education (JustEd), part of the NordForsk programme “Education for tomorrow“. He was a Visiting Fellow in the Department of Education, Oxford 2012-13 and is currently a Visiting Fellow at IASH (The Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities) University of Edinburgh.

Monitoring school performance: a multilevel value-added modelling alternative to England’s ‘expected progress’ measure

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01 December 2014 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract Since 1992, the UK Government has published so-called ‘school league tables’ summarizing the average educational attainment and progress made by pupils in each state-funded secondary school in England. In 2011 the Government made ‘expected progress’ their new headline measure of school progress. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the data underlying the Government’s 2013 tables, in order to statistically critique expected progress and contrast it with the multilevel ‘value-added’ modelling approach.

Students’ self-efficacy beliefs in mathematics: Design and instruments for classroom observations

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27 November 2014 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Gabriel Stylianides, Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Book reading with young children in the 21st century: new formats, old questions?

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26 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstract Semiotic mediation has long been a central focus of sociocultural psychology and allied approaches under the cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) paradigm. It has also been studied in sociolinguistics within the tradition of systemic functional linguistics (SFL) (Halliday, 1978). In these two domains, the mediational, transformative functions of signs are highlighted. Although scholarship has alluded to the methodological implications of Peircean semiotics for CHAT (Edwards, 2007; Holland & Lachicotte Jr., 2007; Prawat, 1999; Valsiner & van der Veer, 2000), there has been scant attention to the cyclical, generative properties of signs identified by Peirce. The ever-changing and evolving landscape of human interactions with the world necessitates a more nuanced understanding of communicative and representational acts. This provides a rationale for sociolinguists and sociocultural theorists to forge ahead with the notion of multimodality by exploring new vistas for the centrality of semiotic mediation in sociolinguistic and sociocultural studies beyond linguistic imperialism. This seminar is based on recent research into the co-articulation of Peirce and Vygotsky on signs (Ma, 2014). It sets out with an overview of conceptual plurality and variance within sociolinguistic and sociocultural perspectives on semiotic mediation. These perspectives advocate for a paradigmatic shift in emphasis from the SFL tradition to the multimodal framework for communication and representation. Arguably, they will continue to complement and interact, configuring a new synthesis through dialectical relationships. Premised on this, the Peirce-Vygotsky synergy is introduced as an analytical approach to the multimodality of semiotic mediation. Following a discussion of its theoretical basis, the logical fusion of deduction and abduction is explained as authorising this synergy. Through the interplay of words and images exhibited in mother-child shared reading of storybooks, the seminar exemplifies how this synergy can afford a nuanced semiotic account of meaning making, interspersed with insights from the notion of “intersemiotic complementarity” (Royce, 2007). Exploratory as it is, this seminar seeks to inform current debates on the methodological relevance of Peircean semiotics for CHAT by bringing the confluence of Peirce and Vygotsky to bear on the study of communication and representation. References Edwards, A. (2007). An interesting resemblance: Vygotsky, Mead, and American pragmatism. In H. Daniels, M. Cole & J. V. Wertsch (Eds.), The Cambridge companion to Vygotsky (pp. 77-100). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Halliday, M. A. K. (1978). Language as social semiotic: The social interpretation of language and meaning. London, UK: Arnold. Holland, D. & Lachicotte Jr., W. (2007). Vygotsky, Mead, and the new sociocultural studies of identity. In H. Daniels, M. Cole & J. V. Wertsch (Eds.), The Cambridge companion to Vygotsky (pp. 102-135). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Ma, J. (2014). The synergy of Peirce and Vygotsky as an analytical approach to the multimodality of semiotic mediation. Mind, Culture, and Activity. Prawat, R. S. (1999). Social constructivism and the process‐content distinction as viewed by Vygotsky and the pragmatists. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 6(4), 255-273. Royce, T. D. (2007). Intersemiotic complementarity: A framework for multimodal discourse analysis. In T. D. Royce & W. L. Bowcher (Eds.), New directions in the analysis of multimodal discourse (pp. 63-109). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Valsiner, J. & van der Veer, R. (2000). The social mind: Construction of the idea. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. About the Speaker James Ma is a linguist. He received a PhD from the University of Bristol and subsequent postdoctoral training from the University of Oxford. His academic interests are in cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), post-structuralism, semiotics, critical discourse analysis (CDA), and a priori research methodology.

Sign action: towards an ontological affinity of Peirce and Vygotsky on semiotic mediation

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26 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Abstract Semiotic mediation has long been a central focus of sociocultural psychology and allied approaches under the cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) paradigm. It has also been studied in sociolinguistics within the tradition of systemic functional linguistics (SFL) (Halliday, 1978). In these two domains, the mediational, transformative functions of signs are highlighted. Although scholarship has alluded to the methodological implications of Peircean semiotics for CHAT (Edwards, 2007; Holland & Lachicotte Jr., 2007; Prawat, 1999; Valsiner & van der Veer, 2000), there has been scant attention to the cyclical, generative properties of signs identified by Peirce. The ever-changing and evolving landscape of human interactions with the world necessitates a more nuanced understanding of communicative and representational acts. This provides a rationale for sociolinguists and sociocultural theorists to forge ahead with the notion of multimodality by exploring new vistas for the centrality of semiotic mediation in sociolinguistic and sociocultural studies beyond linguistic imperialism. This seminar is based on recent research into the co-articulation of Peirce and Vygotsky on signs (Ma, 2014). It sets out with an overview of conceptual plurality and variance within sociolinguistic and sociocultural perspectives on semiotic mediation. These perspectives advocate for a paradigmatic shift in emphasis from the SFL tradition to the multimodal framework for communication and representation. Arguably, they will continue to complement and interact, configuring a new synthesis through dialectical relationships. Premised on this, the Peirce-Vygotsky synergy is introduced as an analytical approach to the multimodality of semiotic mediation. Following a discussion of its theoretical basis, the logical fusion of deduction and abduction is explained as authorising this synergy. Through the interplay of words and images exhibited in mother-child shared reading of storybooks, the seminar exemplifies how this synergy can afford a nuanced semiotic account of meaning making, interspersed with insights from the notion of “intersemiotic complementarity” (Royce, 2007). Exploratory as it is, this seminar seeks to inform current debates on the methodological relevance of Peircean semiotics for CHAT by bringing the confluence of Peirce and Vygotsky to bear on the study of communication and representation. References Edwards, A. (2007). An interesting resemblance: Vygotsky, Mead, and American pragmatism. In H. Daniels, M. Cole & J. V. Wertsch (Eds.), The Cambridge companion to Vygotsky (pp. 77-100). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Halliday, M. A. K. (1978). Language as social semiotic: The social interpretation of language and meaning. London, UK: Arnold. Holland, D. & Lachicotte Jr., W. (2007). Vygotsky, Mead, and the new sociocultural studies of identity. In H. Daniels, M. Cole & J. V. Wertsch (Eds.), The Cambridge companion to Vygotsky (pp. 102-135). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Ma, J. (2014). The synergy of Peirce and Vygotsky as an analytical approach to the multimodality of semiotic mediation. Mind, Culture, and Activity. Prawat, R. S. (1999). Social constructivism and the process‐content distinction as viewed by Vygotsky and the pragmatists. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 6(4), 255-273. Royce, T. D. (2007). Intersemiotic complementarity: A framework for multimodal discourse analysis. In T. D. Royce & W. L. Bowcher (Eds.), New directions in the analysis of multimodal discourse (pp. 63-109). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Valsiner, J. & van der Veer, R. (2000). The social mind: Construction of the idea. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. About the Speaker James Ma is a linguist. He received a PhD from the University of Bristol and subsequent postdoctoral training from the University of Oxford. His academic interests are in cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), post-structuralism, semiotics, critical discourse analysis (CDA), and a priori research methodology.

On the nature of antitheism: an exploratory study of anti-Christian prejudice in English secondary schools

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25 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lorraine Foreman-Peck and Dr Alis Oancea, Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Abstract The French philosopher Jacques Maritain used the term “antitheism” to describe atheism that is positive and absolute in its hostility towards God. Recently, it has been used as an epithet by atheists, most famously by the New Atheist Christopher Hitchens. According to Maritain, an antitheist is someone who rejects the possibility of God and wishes the idea of God to be banished from the intellectual, public and political spheres. Some have claimed that antitheism is not a prejudice like anti-Semitism or Islamophobia. They argue that as prejudice must involve an element of irrationality, and hostility to the idea of God and the influence of the Christian Church in society is rational, it follows that antitheism is not a prejudice. This view is endorsed by the New Atheists, and has been articulated by those critical of the role of Christian groups in public life who see opposition towards the beliefs, values and influence of Christianity not as a prejudice but a right of free thinkers in a liberal society. This paper considers these arguments and suggests that contrary to them, antitheism bears conceptual similarities to other forms of religious prejudice. This philosophical argument is supported by a sociological analysis of the reported experiences of Christian adolescents in English secondary schools. About the speaker Daniel Moulin is a Research Fellow in the Institute of Culture and Society in the University of Navarra, Spain. He has published articles in the British Educational Research Journal, The Oxford Review of Education, and the British Journal of Religious Education. He completed his Economic and Social Research Council funded doctorate at Oxford University Department of Education and Harris Manchester College. He was awarded a boursier d´excellence scholarship in the Autonomous Faculty of Protestant Theology in the University of Geneva in 2013, and the Carmen Blacker Prize for the Study of Religion by Somerville College in 2012. His introduction to the educational thought of Leo Tolstoy is published in paperback by Bloomsbury this autumn.

Applied Linguistics Seminar

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25 November 2014 13:30 -
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Xin Wang, Applied Linguistics Research Group

Are there some questions that can't be answered? The limits of research in teacher education (Public seminar)

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24 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar room A

Convener: Professor Harry Daniels, Director of Research Abstract: This year will see the publication of no fewer than four high-profile reports into different aspects of teacher education (BERA-RSA, UUK, IFS/Nuffield, DFE Carter Review). Clearly a lot of questions are being asked and a wide range of evidence is being marshalled, although each of them is limited in different ways by their particular terms of reference, and by the perceptions of institutional bias that might colour the ways in which they are interpreted.  However, even if all such potential bias could be eliminated, there remain doubts about the capacity of even the highest-quality research to answer the fundamental question driving any investigation into the effectiveness of teacher education – its impact on student outcomes. Drawing on their paper commissioned for the BERA-RSA Inquiry into the role of research in teacher education, and on their previous longitudinal research into the nature of beginning teachers’ learning, Katharine Burn and Trevor Mutton will explore some of the reasons for this apparent impasse and consider the range of ways in which teacher education researchers and practitioners might respond. About the Speakers: Katharine Burn is an Associate Professor of Education at the University of Oxford, where she teaches on the PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching. Her research interests focus on history education and on teachers’ professional learning in various settings. She is Chair of the Secondary Committee of the Historical Association and an editor of the professional journal, Teaching History.   Trevor Mutton is an Associate Professor of Education and Director of the PGCE programme at the University of Oxford. He teaches on the MSc programme in Learning and Teaching and his research focuses primarily on the professional learning of beginning teachers. He is a member of the UCET Executive Committee.

School effects on Chilean children’s achievement growth in language and mathematics: an accelerated growth curve model

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24 November 2014 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract The present study investigates school effects on student achievement growth in Chile. In order to do so the shape and predictors of primary students’ achievement trajectories in language (Spanish) and mathematics are examined and the magnitude of school effects is estimated using a contextual value-added approach. The study’s data sets were obtained by linking data from Chilean assessment programmes and administrative records and feature an accelerated longitudinal design comprising students in 4 overlapping cohorts, together spanning Grades 3 to 8 (N = 24,458 students in 157 schools). Results indicate non-linear upward growth on student achievement in primary school and significant individual differences in achievement status and, to a lesser extent, in rate of development over time. Differences in growth were related to student gender, age and, in language only, to school compositional effects. School effects on students’ growth trajectories were found to be sizeable and larger than those in previous studies using similar model specifications and outcomes in industrialised economies.

OSAT Reading Group

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19 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT) Reading: Arja Haapasaari, Yrjö Engeström & Hannele Kerosuo (2014): The emergence of learners’ transformative agency in a Change Laboratory intervention, Journal of Education and Work. Published online April 1st 2014.

How do we know that someone knows how?

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18 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Lorraine Foreman-Peck and Dr Alis Oancea, Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum in association with the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Abstract This paper considers how professional knowledge should be assessed. The intellectualist arguments of Bengson and Moffett, which suggest that someone’s giving an account of how to F should suffice for attributing to them knowledge of how to F are set out. The arguments fail to show that there is no necessary distinction between two kinds of know-how, namely the ability to F and knowing that w is a way to F, such that the latter is more fundamental. The consequences of this failure for our understanding of professional assessment are then considered. The issue of the assessment of tacit knowledge is then addressed. It is concluded that there is no context-dependent codifiable or articulable propositional knowledge of how to F which could be substituted for being able to F and that therefore tacit knowledge can only be assessed in performance. The parallel with Gettier cases is reviewed and it is concluded that the provenance of accounts of and justifications for the attribution of know-how are not matters of indifference to its assessment. Finally, the question of evaluability or what Ryle would have called the applicability of intelligence epithets is discussed in relation to its relevance to our procedures for assessing practical knowledge. Once again, it was concluded that excellent performance is necessary to attribute excellence in know-how. About the speaker Christopher Winch is Professor of Educational Philosophy and Policy in the Department of Education and Professional Studies, King's College, London. He has taught in primary, further and higher education. He is the author of 'Dimensions of Expertise' (Continuum 2010) and a forthcoming book on teacher know-how.

Listening comprehension strategies during ESL classroom interaction

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18 November 2014 13:30 -
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Xin Wang, Applied Linguistics Research Group

The rise and rise of testing and use of assessment data in Australia (Public seminar)

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17 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar room A

Convener: Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Educational Assessment Abstract: In 2008 testing became high stakes in Australia and since that time we have witnessed the rise of a major industry with the emergence of readily available practice tests for purchase, increased provision of online resources and burgeoning tutoring services focused on National Assessment Program – Literacy And Numeracy (NAPLAN) style tests.  This presentation will critically examine the emergent issues for students, schools, parents and systems and will argue for a more balanced approach of formative and summative assessment with greater professional and system level understanding of the validity of the primary and secondary uses of assessment data.  Empirical evidence is drawn from two recent studies of how assessment data is used by schools and systems for the purposes of accountability and improvement.  One study is an Australian Research Council Linkage project entitled “Ethical Leadership: A collaborative investigation of equity-driven evidence-based school reform” and the other draws on the largest collection and analysis of research data on multiple facets of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education in state schools.  From the evidence of these studies it is concluded that the misuses of assessment data derive from interpretations that cannot be justified because there is too much inference, the interpretation is based on unreliable results or simplistic readings.  Key emergent issues relate to the current evaluation system and whether the major assessment instruments actually assess what constituent communities, governments and the public deem to be of value.  With the requirement for greater effectiveness, equity and quality in education to meet economic, social and political demands major tensions and pressures have arisen.  These will be critically examined. Where there has been some success in the use of assessment data and methods that address some of these demands these are articulated and presented as a way forward in this particular high stakes context.

The effects of cross-group friendships in South African classrooms: a longitudinal study into the mediators of the relationship between intergroup contact and wider attitude generalization using structural equation modelling

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17 November 2014 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract Societies nowadays are becoming increasingly diverse. Within these diversifying societies, however, individuals tend to segregate towards others that are like themselves. It is often at school where children come into contact for the first time with others who are different to themselves in terms of race, religion, or nationality. Given that schools are charged with preparing students to meet, live, and function in society with fellow citizens from diverse backgrounds, it becomes important to understand the effect, and the extent of the effect, that interracial mixing can have on intergroup attitudes, especially in places that have experienced conflict, such as South Africa. In this presentation, I explore the role that intergroup contact with one outgroup can have on reducing prejudice towards other outgroups—known as the secondary transfer effect of contact—using a three-wave longitudinal structural equation model with latent variables amongst South African secondary school students. Furthermore, I tested if these effects of intergroup contact, and the processes (mediators) by which they work, are the same for economic majority (i.e., White South African) and economic minority (i.e., Mixed-race South African) students. The results indicate that, while there is evidence for the secondary transfer effect of contact, the role that socio-historical factors play in shaping our intergroup contact experiences cannot be overlooked.

Quality and Inequality: Do disadvantaged three and four year olds experience lower quality early years provision?

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12 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

A study of the relationships between informal second language contact, vocabulary-related strategic behaviour and vocabulary gain in a study-abroad context.

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11 November 2014 13:30 -
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Xin Wang, Applied Linguistics Research Group

The use of research in policy making, reviews and the work of government (Public seminar)

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10 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar room A

Convener: Professor Pamela Sammons, FELL About the speaker:  Ray Shostak is Honorary Norman Fellow at the Department of Education.  Previously he was the Head of the Prime Minister’s Delivery Unit, Director General Performance Management and member of the Board of Her Majesty’s Treasury from 2007 – 2011. Ray was awarded a CBE for services to education by HM Queen in 2005.

Can a comparison of the different patterns of attainment in English and mathematics contribute to a more nuanced understanding of school effectiveness?

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10 November 2014 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract Initial exploration of the different effects of predictors on attainment in mathematics and English at the school level revealed that there were differences in their explanatory power. These differences are masked when attainment at GCSE is considered as ‘5 A*-C including English and maths’. Publically available school level data can tell us only so much, however; initial work with the NPD also reveals similar patterns of differences at pupil level. In this session different models will be offered for discussion in order to explore school effectiveness for particular groups of students in the two subjects.

An introduction to Vygotsky Part 2: the headlines

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05 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT)

An intervention study on the structure of Chinese writing system for L2 learners of Chinese

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05 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

An evidence-based evaluation of bilingual teaching (CLIL) programmes in Germany: results from the large-scale longitudinal study DENOCS

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04 November 2014 13:30 -
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Xin Wang, Applied Linguistics Research Group Abstract Reliable large-scale studies on CLIL are rare (e.g. Pérez-Cañado, 2012) and thus its benefits in comparison to mainstream education are yet to be confirmed. Moreover, the uniqueness of every educational system, societal contexts and the diverging implementations of CLIL render it difficult to transfer research results. Two additional issues further complicate evaluations of CLIL in Germany: The selective nature of German CLIL programmes and two extra English lessons as a preparation for future CLIL pupils. In cross-sectional studies, it remains unclear to what extent the observed differences between CLIL and non-CLIL pupils already existed a priori, a circumstance which might have skewed research results in previous studies that were designed to prove the benefits of CLIL. DENOCS (Development of North-Rhine Westphalian CLIL Students) is a longitudinal quasi-experimental study with 1,398 secondary pupils that measured, inter alia, students’ general language proficiency in English (with high-quality C-tests), academic self-concept, subject-related interest (scales on a questionnaire) and out-of-school exposure to English. 50 classes were tested right before CLIL commenced (year 6, M age=11.9) and then again after one and two years of CLIL; the first control group consisted of non-CLIL students from CLIL schools (negatively selected pupils), the second one comprised regular/mainstream students from schools without any CLIL provision (unselected pupils). Statistical analyses show that before the first CLIL lesson pupils in these strands clearly outperform both non-CLIL control groups (H(2)=8.66, p<.000, effect sizes range from large to medium: 1.20 ≤ Cohen’s d ≤ .54; see Rumlich, 2013). A structural equation model (Χ²(10)=17.76, p=.06; CFI=.99; TLI=.97; RMSEA=.03, .00 < 90% CI < .05; SRMR=.01; R²=.61) of the development of pupils’ proficiency, academic self-concept and subject-related interest over two years indicates that there are no (general lang. prof./interest) or just very small (self-concept) effects of CLIL when prior differences are taken into account and pupils’ development is evaluated on the basis of an unselected control group. Yet, when using the incorrectly specified regression models of previous studies on the same data (without controlling for initial differences, without unbiased control group), one incorrectly finds substantial CLIL effects. These results provide important evidence for the suspected selection and preparation effects – leading to considerable bias in cross-sectional evaluations – and have led to an overestimation of the benefits of CLIL in many of the studies conducted in Germany so far. In my talk, the implications of these findings as well as potential explanations will be discussed critically in the broader context of CLIL research. References Pérez-Cañado, M. L. (2012). CLIL research in Europe: past, present, and future. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 15(3), 315–341. doi:10.1080/13670050.2011. 630064. Rumlich, D. (2013). Students’ general English proficiency prior to CLIL: Empirical evidence for substantial differences between prospective CLIL and non-CLIL students in Germany. In S. Breidbach & B. Viebrock (Eds.), Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) in Europe: Research perspectives on policy and practice (pp. 181-201). Frankfurt am Main: Lang. About the speaker Dominik Rumlich works as a junior researcher and lecturer at the university of Duisburg-Essen in Germany. His areas of expertise are CLIL, assessment, individual learner characteristics, and quantitative research (methods). He is currently involved in multiple research projects and in charge of a multi-method study on "The school book 2.0". His large-scale PhD project DENOCS will provide the backbone for his PhD thesis with the provisionary title "Evaluating the effects of bilingual education: German CLIL students' foreign language development and their affective-motivational dispositions". His thesis will presumably be completed by the end of 2014.

Effects of pre-school education on outcomes at age 16 and predicted lifetime earnings: findings from the mixed method EPPSE study (Public seminar)

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03 November 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar room A

Convener: Professor Harry Daniels, Director of Research Abstract: The Effective Pre-school, Primary and Secondary (EPPSE) project followed 3,000 children from early childhood to age 16.  Its latest findings from age 16 show that their GCSE results and social development were influenced by what happened to them as young children as well as their experiences in primary and secondary school.   In addition to GCSE results and social behaviours,  the latest report included findings on aspirations, mental wellbeing,  engagement in risky behaviours, and post 16 destinations, including NEET. Key findings: • Attending a pre-school had a positive influence on GCSE results, total scores as well as grades in  English and mathematics • Higher quality pre-school improved GCSE scores, English and maths grades and social behaviours.  Children who had attended higher quality pre-school settings also showed more self-regulation and lower levels of hyperactivity at age 16. The quality of pre-school was especially important for children whose parents had low qualification levels • Attending pre-school, particularly for a longer period, or attending settings of higher quality, predicted a greater likelihood of following an academic pathway (4 or more A/AS levels) post 16. • Based on GCSE scores, economists at the Institute of Fiscal Studies were able to predict the monetary benefits to individuals and benefits to the Exchequer. Pre-school attendance was associated with a benefit of around £27,000 for an individual over a life time.  This is the first European study to place a monetary value on attendance at pre-school. • In secondary schools where teachers had a strong focus on learning, trusting relationships with students and gave more feedback on work, students had both better GCSE outcomes and social development. • Regardless of background, the majority of students had high aspirations, aiming at professional jobs and most wanted to attend university. There were strong gender differences in career choices, with girls who had done poorly in GCSEs lowering their sights more than boys with similar attainment. • Girls also reported lower levels of well-being than boys. The findings from 7 separate reports and a composite final report are available from http://eppe.ioe.ac.uk The study was funded by the Department for Education (1997 – 2014) and was led the by: Professors Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish and Pam Sammons at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, and Professor Iram Siraj and Brenda Taggart at the Institute of Education, London. About the speakers: Professor Pam Sammons is Course Director for the MSc in Education: Research Design and Methodology at the Department of Education in Oxford. Previously she was co-director of the EdD in Educational Leadership at the School of Education in Nottingham and a Professor of Education at the Institute of Education, University of London and Coordinating Director of its International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (1999-2004). She has been involved in educational research for the last 30 years with a special focus on the topics of school effectiveness and improvement, leadership and equity in education. She has a particular interest in the evaluation of education policy initiatives including both formative and summative approaches. Professor Kathy Sylva is Professor of Educational Psychology at the Department of Education in Oxford. She is one of the leaders of the DCSF research on effective provision of pre-school and primary education and on the evaluations of the Transformation Fund and the Early Learning Partnership Project. After earning a PhD at Harvard University Kathy moved to Oxford where she taught Psychology while serving on the Oxford Pre-school Research Group which was led by Jerome Bruner. Her book Childwatching at Playgroup and Nursery School broke new ground by questioning an unbridled ‘free play’ ideology.She was Specialist Advisor to the House of Commons Select Committee on Education and Employment during their Inquiry into Early Education (2001). She serves on Government advisory committees concerned with national assessment, evaluation of programmes such as Sure Start, and curriculum for children 0-7 years (2003, 2005-6, 2008). She advised the Scottish Parliament in 2005-6 on Early Years; and in 2006 she advised the Government on the teaching of phonics She has been given honorary doctorates by the Open University and Oxford Brookes University. She is an Elected Fellow of the British Psychological Society and in 2008 she was awarded an OBE for services to children and families.

Cumulative educational inequalities over life-course: Social origins and life-long learning in Britain

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03 November 2014 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room B

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract In the UK policy agenda much importance is attached – and with good empirical support – to pre-school programmes for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. But there is far less consensus on the effectiveness of later-life interventions, in particular through various programmes of post-school training. In this paper I will shed some light on this matter. My main objective is to study the role of later-life qualifications – ‘life-long learning’ – in inter-generational social mobility. More specifically, I investigate to what extent individuals acquire qualifications in their later lives and how this form of educational attainment is related to social origins. Especially important here are questions of how far such attainment compensates for or builds on earlier levels of attainment, and how far it serves to narrow or to maintain or even to widen educational inequalities associated with social origins. To address the research questions, I use data from two British birth cohort studies – covering individuals born in 1958 and 1970 – and apply longitudinal research methods.

Size matters and matters of size: understanding massive online teaching

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30 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Isis Training Room, IT Services, 13 Banbury Road

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group Abstract:  Nitin Parmar leads transformation in technology enhanced practice at the University of Bath where he is based within the e-Learning team in the Learning & Teaching Enhancement Office. This presentation will describe the positive impact of team-based curriculum development within the context of MOOC development for the FutureLearn platform. Nitin will explore the differing nature of collaborative working practices, the mix of educational development orientations which were used, the importance of context and the disciplinary differences and cultures which enabled momentum within cross-institutional project working. Through the analysis of quantitative and qualitative data collected from the MOOC learners, Nitin will also critically reflect upon the role of the lead educator within MOOCs and discuss how the differing approaches to course development can encourage learner engagement.

Farewell to Anne Edwards: Contributions to Theory and Research

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30 October 2014 16:00 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT)

Snapshots of emotional wellbeing of the younger children in day-care groups

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29 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups

How professionals learn: patterns of self-regulation

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28 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G/H

Convener: Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group

Drawing a line between autonomy and individualism: practices of teacher induction and continuing professional development of teachers in Finland

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28 October 2014 16:00 -
Seminar Room E

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract The induction phase initiating a teaching career is a challenge in Finland, as well as in many other countries. In some countries, policy makers seem to borrow neoliberal models from other countries in rather straightforward ways with sudden policy changes and unexpected consequences, which has been realized, for instance, in Sweden. (Geeraets, Tynjälä, Markkanen,  Pennanen, Heikkinen & Gijbels 2014.) In this presentation, the social-political preconditions of practices of teacher learning and development are addressed. The theoretical insights offered by this presentation are rooted in the theory of practice architectures. This theoretical framework is based on a multi-perspective approach on practice.  Practices can be studied as (1) performance, work, activities and activity systems, (2) from the perspective of meaning and discourse, and (3) in terms of power, solidarity. Thus, with regard to ‘practice architectures’, we will study practices with regard to the (1) material-economic (‘doings’), (2) the cultural-discursive (‘sayings’), and (3) the social-political preconditions (‘relatings’) (Kemmis & Heikkinen, 2012; Kemmis, Heikkinen, Fransson, Aspfors & Edwards-Groves 2014; see also Nicolini 2013). The social-political dimension enables us to study also elements of power and solidarity which enable and constrain our everyday practices and go beyond material-economic and cultural-discursive considerations.  One of the most important element of the cultural-discursive preconditions of practices of teacher learning and development is that of professional autonomy.

Use of students’ first language in English language teaching: Asian perspectives

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28 October 2014 13:30 -
Seminar Room K/L

Convener: Dr Xin Wang, Applied Linguistics Research Group Abstract During the 20th century, it was commonly assumed that the best way to teach English as a foreign language was through the exclusive use of English as the medium of instruction. Recently, scholars have challenged this view, but there is still a tendency for many educational policy-makers in schools and universities to insist on ‘English only’, and decry the classroom use of the first languages of learners and teachers. Observational data from a recent volume of case studies (Barnard & McLellan, 2014) clearly show that switching between the first and target languages is a common practice across a wide range of university English classrooms in Asian contexts. In some cases, this codeswitching occurred more or less spontaneously and at random. Often, however, teachers in these studies alternated between languages in a principled and systematic way. This presentation presents and discusses brief extracts from interviews with teachers, where they explained the rationale behind their use of the students’ first language Thus codeswitching is both normal and can be pedagogically justified. The presentation will conclude with suggesting how teachers can reflect on their use of language(s) in their own classrooms by recording, listening to, and systematically analysing data. About the speaker Dr. Barnard is an associate professor at the University of Waikato, where he teaches MA courses in applied linguistics and supervises PhD students. Before taking up his post in 1995, he worked in Europe and the Middle East as a teacher, teacher trainer, director of studies and English Language Adviser to Ministries of Education. His recent research and publication interests include classroom interaction (Barnard & Torres-Guzman 2009), teacher cognition (Barnard & Burns 2012), and codeswitching (Barnard & McLellan 2014). He has presented papers on these, and other, topics at many international conferences and invited professorships, and is at present leading an international project exploring teachers’ beliefs and practices regarding language learner autonomy in several Asian contexts (Barnard & Li 2015).

English language policy and educational planning: issues and concerns in Asian contexts (Public seminar)

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27 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar room A

Convener: Professor Ernesto Macaro, Applied Linguistics Research Group Abstract: This presentation discusses a number of current issues and concerns relating to English Language policies with particular attention to educational contexts in Asia. It begins with identifying the goals of a language policy. It is then suggested that, to be effective, a language policy needs to take into consideration the contexts in which the implementation is intended. There follow examples of language policies in specific contexts, each of which begins with a brief sociolinguistic sketch and ends with some questions about the wisdom of current policies: the choice of official languages (Timor Leste); the curricular aims of English as a Foreign Language (Vietnam); the early introduction of English as a foreign language (Korea); ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ English speaking teachers (Japan); English as the medium of instruction in primary schools (Malaysia) and in universities (Thailand). The presentation concludes by emphasising the need for further research that takes into account the influence of sociocultural factors in the specific contexts where policies are to be implemented. It also argues for a reconsideration of the tendency of educational language policies to be imposed on, rather than negotiated with, key stakeholders, chief among which are the teachers who have to interpret and implement the policies. About the speaker: Dr Barnard is an associate professor at the University of Waikato, where he teaches MA courses in applied linguistics and supervises PhD students. Before taking up his post in 1995, he worked in Europe and the Middle East as a teacher, teacher trainer, director of studies and English Language Adviser to Ministries of Education. His recent research and publication interests include classroom interaction (Barnard & Torres-Guzman 2009), teacher cognition (Barnard & Burns 2012), and codeswitching (Barnard & McLellan 2014). He has presented papers on these, and other, topics at many international conferences and invited professorships, and is at present leading an international project exploring teachers’ beliefs and practices regarding language learner autonomy in several Asian contexts (Barnard & Li 2015).

Are there distinctive clusters of higher and lower status universities in the UK? THIS SEMINAR IS POSTPONED UNTIL TRINITY TERM 2015

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27 October 2014 12:15 - 13:45

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract In this paper I analyse publicly available data on the research activity, teaching environment, economic resources, academic selectivity and social mix of UK universities to explore how the differentiation of UK universities is structured. In 1992 the binary divide between universities and polytechnics was dismantled to create a nominally unitary system of higher education for the UK. However, the following year saw the publication of the first UK university rankings, and the year after that saw the formation of the Russell Group of self-proclaimed "leading" universities. This paper asks whether UK universities are spread out along a fine-grained linear hierarchy of the sort brought to mind by university rankings, or whether there are distinctive clusters of higher and lower status universities as suggested by the existence of university mission groups such as the Russell Group. In particular the paper asks whether the Russell Group of universities can be said to form a distinctive cluster of leading universities.

FELL/Children Learning Joint Seminar

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22 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Rooms K/L

Conveners: Professor Terezinha Nunes and Professor Kathy Sylva, Children Learning and FELL Research Groups Students’ perceived teacher support and motivation toward learning: insights from teacher-student interactions in Montessori classrooms, Hanako Shimamura, Department of Education Let’s Think through Science: the effects of the programme on cognitive development and scientific understanding in children aged 8-9, Jennifer McGowan-Smyth, Department of Education

Exploring cardinality by constructing infinite processes

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21 October 2014 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room G

Convener:Dr Rebecca Eynon, Learning and New Technologies Research Group (Joint Seminar with the Mathematics Research Group) Abstract I will present the design and implementation of computer programming activities aimed at introducing young students (9–13 years old) to the idea of infinity, and in particular, to the cardinality of infinite sets. I will focus on a subset of the work in which students explored concepts of cardinality of infinite sets by interpreting and constructing ToonTalk computer programs. Our hypothesis is that via carefully designed computational explorations within an appropriately constructed medium, infinity can be approached in a learnable way that does not sacrifice the rigour necessary for mathematical understanding of the concept,and at the same time contributes to introducing the real spirit of mathematics to the school setting. Time permitting I will also present similar work on exploring the convergence of infinite series. Based upon the paper Ken Kahn, Evgenia Sendova, Ana Isabel Sacristan, and Richard Noss, Young Students Exploring Cardinality by Constructing Infinite Processes, Technology, Knowledge and Learning Journal, May 2011 About the speaker Ken Kahn is a senior researcher at the University of Oxford IT Services leading the Modelling4All project that combines ideas of accessible modelling within a web 2.0 community. He is the designer and developer of ToonTalk, a programming system for children that provides concrete analogues of advanced computational abstractions with a video game look and feel. He piloted a One Laptop per Child project in West Papua.

Progression, knowledge and assessment in the curriculum: Who's interested in the sociology of knowledge now? (Public Seminar)

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20 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar room A

Convener: Dr Alis Oancea, Religion, Philosophy and Education Forum Abstract: Using tools from ethnography and Bernstein's concept of pedagogic discourse, this paper will consider the relationships between progression, knowledge and assessment as they have been instantiated in the literacy curriculum at two particular moments in time: at the beginning of the 19th century as elementary schools began to be founded; and under the education reform agendas of both Coalition and New Labour governments since 1997.  The different logics at work will be the focus for discussion, with a broader set of questions raised about the role of a sociology of knowledge in tackling the urgent problems facing practitioners now. About the speaker: Gemma Moss is Professor of Education at the Institute of Education, University of London.  Her main research interests include literacy policy; gender and literacy; the shifting relationships between policy makers, practitioners and stakeholders that are re-shaping the literacy curriculum; and the use of research evidence to support policy and practice.  She specialises in the use of qualitative methods in policy evaluation, and innovative mixed methods research designs. Her most recent research has opened up new questions in the sociology of knowledge by reviewing the design and use of literacy attainment data in different periods in the past.

Tackling the remaining attainment gap between students with and without immigrant background: an investigation into the equivalence of SES constructs

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20 October 2014 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract In England, as in many European countries, students with immigrant background exhibit lower educational attainment than those without immigrant background. Family socioeconomic status (SES) helps explain differences in educational attainment but a gap remains that differs in size for students from different immigrant backgrounds. While the explanatory repertoire for the remaining gap is broad, it has been neglected to comprehensively investigate whether family SES constructs are equivalent across students with and without immigrant background. Using data from the first wave of the CILS4EU study for England (n=4,315), the paper applies exploratory structural equation modelling (ESEM) to evaluate measurement invariance of family background constructs across students without and with immigrant background, specifically Pakistani/Bangladeshi immigrant background. Results suggest differences in the structure of family SES indicators across groups and in their association with educational attainment. A complementary set of variables is suggested to enhance family SES indicators. Findings are relevant to researchers investigating educational inequalities related to immigrant background.

The cultivation of critical literacy in secondary schools: insights from UK policy and international practice

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16 October 2014 16:00 -
Seminar Room E

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract Although ‘critical literacy’ appears in a number of UK educational policy documents, its meaning is contested resulting in professional disengagement and patchy provision (Reid 2012). This seminar will summarise current scholarship on critical literacy as a cross-curricular skill and will provide an overview of its interpretation in UK educational policy. The results of a comparative research study conducted in Australia and New Zealand will be shared, outlining innovative practical approaches which prioritise critical literacy in the classroom. Particular mention will be made of Victoria's vocational education pathway, Dunedin's 'critical literacy learning community' and New South Wales' oracy continuum. Critical literacy deserves more attention in UK classrooms - come along to find out why! About the speaker Dr Arlene Holmes-Henderson is a post-doctoral researcher in the Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford, working on the Classics in Communities project. She completed the PGCE in Classics at Trinity College, Cambridge and taught Latin, Greek and Classical Studies in secondary schools in Scotland and England for eight years before completing her Doctorate in Classics Education. She has diverse interests in both Classics and Education: her thesis was titled, 'A defence of Classical rhetoric in Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence'. This work argued that Classics (and rhetoric in particular) has much to offer the teaching and learning of literacy, critical literacy critical thinking and responsible citizenship. Arlene has recently returned to Oxford from two international collaborations: one as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hawaii, and the other as  Churchill Fellow at the Universities of Auckland, Otago, Melbourne and Sydney.

An Introduction to Vygotsky

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15 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room G

Conveners: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Ian Thompson (OSAT)

Department of Education Research Poster Conference

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13 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Rooms A, B, G & H

Contact the Research Secretary for further information

Standards of evidence: inching towards a theory of ‘what works’ in intervention

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13 October 2014 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room J

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub Abstract For decades the randomised control trial (RCT) has been the gold standard of evidence on effectiveness, especially for researchers who wish to claim a causal relation between an intervention and outcomes for participants. However, there are many research designs that do not meet the rigorous standards of an RCT but which can, nonetheless, provide limited evidence for effectiveness. This seminar will present the recently published Early Intervention Foundation (EIF) scale for evaluating evidence on effective interventions or services. Rankings go from 4 (shown to be consistently effective through multiple RCTs), through to 2 (potentially effective on basis on pre- post studies or non-randomised comparisons), and to 0 (no logic or theoretical model, or empirical evidence). There is also a ‘negative’ category for those interventions which trial evidence shows to be ineffective or harmful. The EIF scale for ranking evidence will be illustrated with 4 studies on the SPOKES programme (Supporting Parents on Kids’ Education). This is a group based programme in which parents take part in a variety of activities over the course of one term aimed at improving their children’s literacy. All activities are aimed at supporting children’s reading along with their motivation and confidence. Early evaluations, mostly in New Zealand, took the form of case studies or small-scale comparisons with non-randomised groups. These seemed successful. The second study took the form of an Efficacy Trial with full randomisation (Scott et al., 2010; Sylva et al., 2008) and showed positive effects of training parents to support children’s reading at home. The third study was a large scale Effectiveness Trial in the ‘real world’. This showed differential effects for different arms of the trial (Scott, Sylva, Kallitsoglou, & Ford, 2014) on measures of reading and also behaviour. Finally, the design of the fourth trial (Sylva et al., 2013) will be described. This (on-going) trial includes a sample of more than 700 children whose parents have been randomised to treatment or control. The sample is drawn from more than 40 schools and is an ‘intention to treat’ design with randomisation within school. Outcome measures include standardised literacy tests for children, as well as interviews with parents and videos of them listening to their children read at home. Does the programme ‘work’? For some outcomes, the answer is yes. References: - Scott, S., Sylva, K., Doolan, M., Price, J., Jacobs, B., Crook, C., & Landau, S. (2010). Randomised controlled trial of parent groups for child antisocial behaviour targeting multiple risk factors: the SPOKES project. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 51(1), 48–57. - Scott, S., Sylva, K., Kallitsoglou, A., & Ford, T. (2014). Which type of parenting programme best improves child behaviour and reading? (pp. 1–44). London, UK: Nuffield Foundation. - Sylva, K., Archer, A., Roberts, F., & Ebbens, A. (2013, November). Conducting research in schools: What are the challenges? The developer’s perspective. Paper presented at the Institute of Education. London, UK. - Sylva, K., Scott, S., Totsika, V., Ereky-Stevens, K., & Crook, C. (2008). Training parents to help their children read: a randomized control trial. The British Journal of Educational Psychology, 78(Pt 3), 435–55.

Fear of freedom?! Ambivalences and patterns of success in implementing research-based learning and teaching methods in teacher education. Interim results

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09 October 2014 14:00 -
Seminar Room C

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract This paper presents initial results and experiences of the implementation of research-based learning and teaching methods in teacher training at the Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg/Germany since October 2011. By this concept, we mean, on the one hand, the close integration of (genuine) university research and teaching, and on the other, the autonomous design, implementation and presentation of self-selected student research work. The aim of this "research-teaching" approach is, firstly, to provide the students with key theoretical and methodological empirical research skills and to initiate critical and reflective thinking processes. The actual research work on a real object of investigation is carried out in relatively autonomous student research groups. A main goal of this process is to establish a research habitus, based both on the individual acquisition of knowledge and on the ability to transfer research-based teaching methods in the future (teaching at school). Specifically, this paper asks to what extent these assumptions are feasible under the conditions of modularised study structures, which resistors and ambivalences show up and what effects can be achieved in teacher training with this concept.  

The Rt Revd John Pritchard, Bishop of Oxford, reflects on his time as the Church of England’s lead bishop on education

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07 October 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: Dr Alis Oancea, Dr Liam Gearon and Revd Dr John Gay, Religion Philosophy and Education Research Forum Abstract With 25% of primary and 6% of secondary schools being Church of England ones, for over three years the Bishop of Oxford has been in regular negotiation with central government on education issues. Described by the Guardian as ‘a deft politician who intends to make the best of government policies even though he may not agree with them’, he has never been afraid to speak his mind on issues such as collective worship, church school admission policies and religious education.  The inevitable headlines followed, such as -    ‘Bishop says’: Religious education wrecked by Gove’ (Times 20.07.13) -    ‘The Church’s educational mission should not be about collecting nice Christians into safe places’ (BBC 22.04.11) -   ‘Compulsory Christian school assembly should be scrapped’ (Telegraph 7.07.14)

Young people, mental health and school

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24 June 2014 16:00 - 18:00
Green Templeton College, Woodstock Rd, OX2 6HG (please call at the lodge for directions)

Revised teacher education syllabus at the University of Oslo: an example from English subject didactics

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24 June 2014 14:00 -
Seminar Room C

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract The Department of Teacher Education and School Research at the University of Oslo is Norway's leading academic environment in the fields of Subject Didactics, Educational Leadership and school based research and development. The main task for The Department is to qualify teachers and school leaders for work in Norwegian schools. The Teacher Education Programme gives qualifications for work as a teacher in upper primary and secondary school as well as in adult education. The programme is offered both as a full-time study programme over two terms and as a part-time study programme over three terms. The two major components of the programme are classroom practice and educational and didactic theory. Classroom practice normally takes place at one of the Department`s Partner Schools. Over the last few years, the department has developed integrated teacher education programmes. By integration we mean a coherent study design where scientific subjects, school subjects, pedagogy, subject didactics, theory and practice constitute a whole as a basis for teaching as a profession. In this presentation, I will explain how this integration has been planned and conducted in English subject didactics; how pedagogy and didactics have been integrated, and how the lectures are integrated with the seminars in the second semester. The aim has been to prepare the student teachers for teaching, avoiding the “practice shock” and providing education that might help the student teachers orient themselves towards extended professionality, valuing theories underpinning pedagogy, and adopting a rationally-based approach to teaching, rather than restricted professionals concerned mainly with the practicalities of day-to-day teaching, as argued by Hoyle (1975). About the speaker Lisbeth M Brevik is a PhD candidate at the University of Oslo, Department of Teacher Education and School Research, Oslo, Norway. She lectures on the teacher education programme, and is responsible for English subject didactics. She is a recognised student at the University of Oxford, Department of Education, Trinity term 2014. Supervisor: Anne Edwards.

Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools

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23 June 2014 17:15 -
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Oxford Education Deanery Download the report

At-risk youth, resilience, and academic outcomes

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23 June 2014 12:15 - 13:45
Seminar Room J, 28 Norham Gardens

Conveners: Professor Steve Strand, Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg and Dr James Hall, Quantitative Methods Hub

Qualitative research discussion group

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19 June 2014 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Susan James, Director of Doctoral Studies Jaimie will distribute three journal articles that all use the same methodological approach in different contexts for discussion during the seminar.

One-day workshop on Models for diary data

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19 June 2014 09:00 - 15:00
Manor Road, Oxford

Convener: Dr Lars Malmberg, Quantitative Hub Contact: Thomas Day for further information and registration Abstract Diary studies have long been used in family research. The traditional method of diary studies is one daily report over an extended period of time. The advantages of diaries are (1) the closeness in time between an event and the report of the event, thus minimising retrospection bias, (2) the collection of multiple reports over an extended period of time, (3) the possibility of the diary to function as a self-monitoring tool, a key element of self-regulation, and (4) the possibilities to use these in intervention designs. Paper and pencil versions and electronic versions of diaries appear to work equally well with participants. Importantly, diary data allows us to model processes within individuals over time. Intervention designs can be incorporated using interrupted time-series models. Such models have been used in intervention studies with primary school children’s understanding of mathematics and university students’ self-regulation of learning. Early models of multivariate time-series of individual cases can be incorporated into multiple-group models. In this one-day workshop we will cover state-of-the-art models for diary data, including descriptive analysis, multilevel designs, univariate and multivariate time-series designs. We will provide overviews of principles of research designs (e.g., research questions and hypotheses for diary data, and examples of diaries), data integrity and interpretation (data quality control, problems with aggregation, descriptives) and inferential methods (e.g., ARIMA, intervention analysis, dynamic relationships). The instructors Bernhard Schmitz,  Prof. Dr., holds a full professorship at the  department of educational psychology of the University of Technology Darmstadt. He earned his doctoral degree at the Free University of Berlin, Germany and his habilitation at the University of Technology Berlin, Germany. He worked at the Max-Planck-Institute for Human Development in Berlin. His research deals with self-regulation, diaries and time-series analyses. He published numerous articles and books about time-series and self-regulation. He is member of the editorial board of Metacognition and Learning and Learning and Instruction. Docent, Dr. Lars-Erik Malmberg, Associate Professor, Department of Education, University of Oxford, UK. Lars-Erik Malmberg, Dr, is University Lecture in Quantitative Methods in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford, and Docent in Quantitative Methods at the Faculty of Education, Åbo Akademi University in Finland, and is associate editor of the Journal of Learning and Instruction. He investigates substantive educational research questions using state-of-the-art quantitative modelling, including multilevel and structural equation models. His recent research is on intraperson (situation-specific) aspects of students’ learning and teachers’ mastery experiences, stemming from two projects: the Learning Every Lesson (LEL) and Teaching Every Lesson (TEL) studies. Worked examples Bernhard Schmitz’s worked example deals with a sample of 361 students in grade 5 who worked with diaries for a period of 6 weeks. The students were trained with respect to self-regulated learning. Analyses of trends, intervention analyses and multivariate time -series will be demonstrated. Lars Malmberg’s worked example of a diary study of teacher education students during practicum, and the Learning Every Lesson (LEL) study consisting 300+ students who completed the Learning Experience Questionnaire between 2 to 34 times during a week of school, including self-reports of e.g., effort exertion and competence beliefs. W