Department of Education

Viewing archives for Green Templeton College

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Lucy is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research will focus on looking at how the Service Pupil Premium, a form of government funding, can better support the educational needs and experience of service children (those with military backgrounds) in English state schools.

Prior to her DPhil, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge.

She is passionate about improving the life experiences and outcomes of disadvantaged children and is a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Brad is currently completing his doctoral thesis. He aims to demonstrate that phonological skills can transfer between languages.

Brad developed an innovative programme teaching children phonics in either English or Cantonese. Without any further teaching, children were able to acquire the phonological skills in another language. The successful training results provide strong evidence that phonological skills are transferable across languages. Children develop the phonological skills for a new language by transferring their previous learning, instead of acquiring the skills anew.

In Brad’s research, he tailor-made a set of toys and storybooks for children to enjoy the learning experience. He has also constructed and validated a phonological test that measures children’s phonological awareness of English and Cantonese in parallel. Over 180+ kindergarteners have been individually trained and assessed by Brad using his teaching and assessment materials.

Brad is interested in research related to language development in early childhood. He is specialised in intervention studies using randomised controlled trial design and quantitative methods (e.g. structural equation modelling).

Brad holds a BEd in English Education (First Class Honours) from The University of Hong Kong and an MSc in Child Development and Education (Distinction) from The University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral study, he has worked for NGOs serving underprivileged students.

Title of Thesis

Cross-linguistic transfer of phonological awareness in Chinese Children Receiving English Instruction: An Intervention Study

Publications

Chan, YWB., & Gao, X. (2014). Pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of newly arrived children from Mainland China. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 140-154.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted