Department of Education

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Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Heather was awarded the 2019 FirstRand FNB Fund Scholarship for International Postgraduate study in Education

She completed her MA in Applied linguistics with distinction at the University of Johannesburg. After completing her MA research she began teaching in Johannesburg, during which she completed her PGCE part-time. Heather has come to Oxford after seven years of experience in foundation phase South African classrooms. Her research interests include improving the quality and fairness of assessments within the diverse linguistic environment of South African schools. She is also interested in improving the quality of teacher training within this complex multilingual context.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Abismrita has been exploring the field of education by stepping into multiple roles of that of a fieldworker, teacher and administrator. Her key areas of research are in alternative learning spaces especially the domain of craft and apprenticeship-based learning.

Abismrita has a bachelors and masters degree in Sociology from University of Delhi. She also holds a Masters  degree in Education and Development from the University of Sussex. She has worked as a teacher at alternative school in India under the Krishnamurti Foundation.

Publications

Chakravarty, A. (2018) Curricular Concerns and Practices in a Krishnamurti School. In Thapan, M. (ed) J. Krishnamurti and Educational Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. pp. 98-128

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Benjamin Hart is a DPhil student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of English Higher Education.

His research focusses on evaluation within a widening participation setting and his interests lie primarily in the field of higher education and the philosophy of education.

Following his B.A., and MSc in Sociology, Benjamin completed his MSc Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford. Prior to his DPhil, Benjamin worked in Evaluation at the University of Oxford

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.</