Department of Education

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Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics
  • The Expression of Generality in Mathematics Textbooks
  • The Design and Use of Pedagogically Effective Tasks for Mathematics Learning
  • The Design and Use of Applets for plenary use in teaching mathematics
Current research projects
  • Learning to prove through constructing personal narratives (SSHRC Insight grant with Prof. Gila Hanna, University of Toronto)
  • Advisory panel for “Developing and trialling exemplar tasks that promote early number fluencies, strategies and number sense in Foundation Phase teaching in South Africa” (With Dr. Nicki Roberts)
  • Advisory panel for ” Strategies for ProfessionalDevelopment: Elementary In-service Teachers, Mathematical Abilities and Mathematics Classroom; University of Chile (with Prof. Patricio Felmer)
  • Advisory Panel for “The Role and Use of Examples in Learning to Prove” (with Amy Ellis, NRC-USA)

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Chris Hammond is a part-time doctoral student working under the supervision of Professor Simon Marginson.

He has an MA in Comparative Education from the UCL Institute of Education (UK) and a Master’s in Teaching from the University of Washington (USA). Chris’s primary research focuses on higher education internationalization and regional cooperation in the context of Northeast Asian international relations. He is also involved in a number of collaborative projects, including a study of the experiences and strategies of junior international academics at Japanese universities, a comparative study of universities as spaces for student activism, and a project comparing the global engagement of disaster science research institutes in Japan and the UK.

In addition to research, Chris has worked as a teacher at various levels in Japan and the USA, and as a manager of study abroad, international internships, and international volunteering at a university in the UK. Chris has spent the majority of his professional career as a teacher and researcher at universities in Japan.

Title of Thesis

Regional cooperation in Northeast Asia: comparing policy across institutions and disciplines in the higher education sector in Japan

Publications
Research papers (International peer-reviewed research journals) 

Hammond, C.D. (2019). Dynamics of higher education research collaboration and regional integration in Northeast Asia: a study of the A3 Foresight Program. Higher Education, Springer Netherlands. Published online February 7, 2019 at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10734-019-00363-x

Hammond, C.D. (2018).  Regional Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Comparing Policy Ideas across Institutions and Disciplines at Japanese Universities. (Graduate student research-in-progress), Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education10 (Winter), 46-48. http://ojed.org/index.php/jcihe/article/view/689

Hammond, C. D., & Keating, A. (2018). Global citizens or global workers? Comparing university programmes for global citizenship education in Japan and the UK. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education48(6), 915-934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2017.1369393

Hammond, C. D. (2016). Internationalization, nationalism, and global competitiveness: a comparison of approaches to higher education in China and Japan. Asia Pacific Education Review17(4), 555-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-016-9459-0

Research papers (journals of universities and research associations in Japan)

HAMMOND, C.D – “Dynamics of East Asia: Cultural Connections, Contested History, and the Rise of China” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 40, (in press), 2018. 

HAMMOND, C.D – “Corruption in the Classroom: The Dilemma of Public School Teachers in Cambodia Providing Private Tutoring to Their Own Students” The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, No. 39, February 6, 2018.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Planning for Improvement of Higher Education in Rural China: JICA’s Inland Higher Education Project”, The Journal of the Rikkyo University Language Center, 38, October 25, 2017.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “An Analysis of Dilemmas Impeding Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education”, Kwansei Gakuin University Social Sciences Review, February, 2013: 7-22.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Internationalization of higher education in Japan: Recent trends and challenges from a comparative perspective”, JASEC Bulletin, December, 2012: 47-54.

HAMMOND, C.D. – “Study abroad and the Japanese university: Challenges and opportunities for the coming decade.” JACET Kansai Journal, no. 11. March, 2009: 75-86.

John Mason was retired as Professor Emeritus from the Open University in 2009 where he had worked for 39.5 years. He continues an active interest in and concern for the teaching of mathematics in schools in each and every phase, from kindergarten to university.

He conducts numerous workshops for teachers in the UK and abroad, leads seminars, and presents plenary lectures, always stressing the dimension of lived-experience rather than theoretical stance.

Research

His principal focus is thinking about mathematical problems, and supporting others who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.  Other interests include the study of how authors have expressed to students their awareness of generality, especially in textbooks on the boundary between arithmetic and algebra, and ways of working on and with mental imagery in teaching mathematics.

He is perhaps best known for being the principal author of Thinking Mathematically (with a new augmented edition published in 2009), joint author of Mathematics as a Constructive Enterprise: learner generated examples with his wife, Prof. Anne Watson, for his uncompromisingly experiential stance to research methods in Researching Your Own Practice Using the Discipline of Noticing and for his contribution to practical suggestions for teachers such as Questions & Prompts for Mathematical Thinking, and Thinkers, both written with colleagues.

Publications

See http://www.pmtheta.com/jhm-publications.html for full list

2019
  • 2019 Mason, J. (2019). Evolution of a Task Domain. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education. p1-21.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40751-018-0046-3
2018
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Commentary – Doing is not the same as thinking or construing. In A. Kajander & E. Chernoff (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Secondary School Mathematics: Canadian perspectives in an international context. Springer DOI 978-3-319-92390-1_39
  • 2018 Mason, J. Watson, A. Venkat, H. & Askew, M. (2018). Multiple Formats for Multiplication.Mathematics Teaching262 p21-22.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological Exploration in Mathematics Education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Educating Awareness Through Mediated Action.In D. Hewitt, A. Coles & J. Ingram (Eds.). On Teaching and Learning Mathematics with Awareness. p71-76. Derby: ATM.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Tensions between Teacher and Student Attention. Wikiletter. maths4maryams.org/mathed/wikiletter/
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. p63-91. London: Trentham Books.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Combining Geometrical Transformations: a meta-mathematical narrative. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p21-52. Switzerland: Springer International.
  • 2018 Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018). A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives.
    In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (Eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice. p73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest, (Ed). Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. Springer.
  • ​2018 Mason, J. (2018). How Early is Too Early for Thinking Algebraically?. In C. Kieran (ed.) Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5- to 12-Year Olds: the global evolution of an emerging field of research and practice. ICME13 Springer.
  • 2018 Mason, J. (2018). Scoping Generality: an essential component of mathematical thinking by and for all. In M. Stein. (Ed.) A Life’s Time for Mathematics Education and Problem Solving: festschrift on the occasion of Andras Ambrus’ 75th birthday. Münster: WTM.​
2017
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Structuring Structural Awareness: a commentary on chapter 13. In M. Bussi & X. Sun. Building the Foundation: whole numbers in the primary grades (ICME Study 23). New York: Springer.
  • 2017 Mason, J. & Metz, M. (in press). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Eligio (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Introduction to Part II: Variation as a Pedagogical Perspective for Classroom Instruction in China. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense. p107-p109.
  • 2017 Mason, J. (2017). Issues in Variation Theory and How It Could Inform Pedagogical Choices. In R. Huang & Y. Lee. (Eds.). Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation: Confucian heritage meets western theories. Rotterdam: Sense p407-p438.
2016
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). When is a Problem? “When” is Actually the Problem! In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & J. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p263-285.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Reaction: Problem Posing and Solving Today. In P. Felmer, E. Pehkonen & K. Kilpatrick (Eds.). Posing and Solving Mathematical problems: advances and new perspectives. Switzerland: Springer. p109-113.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding gaps between competence and performance—a commentary. In S. Blömeke & J. Star (Eds.) Perception, Interpretation and Decision Making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance. ZDM, 48 (1-2) p219-226.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Pedagogical Mathematics for Student Exploration of Threshold Concepts. In R. Göller, R. Biehler, R. Hochmuth, H-G. Rück (Eds). Didactics of Mathematics in Higher Education as a Scientific Discipline. KHDM-Report 05-2016. p224-231.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Overcoming the Algebra Barrier: being particular about the general, and generally looking beyond the particular, in homage to Mary Boole. In S. Stewart (Ed.) And the Rest is Just Algebra. Springer p97-117.
  • 2016 Mason, J. (2016). Probing Beneath the Surface of Experience. In J. Wilhelm (Ed.) Teacher Noticing.
  • 2016 Mason, J. & Hanna, G. (2016). Values in Caring for Proof. In B. Larvor (Ed.) Mathematical Cultures: the London meetings 2012-2014. Trends in the History of Science. Switzerland: Birkhauser (Springer International) p239-258.
2015
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE
  • 2015 Mason, J. (submitted). Mathematics Education: down to earth, pie in the sky or suspended animation? JMTE 
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Bringing Reflection to the Fore Using Narrative Construction. Open Paper Comment on Eirini Geraniou & Manolis Mavrikis “Building Bridges To Algebra Through A Constructionist Learning Environment” in C. Kynagos & G. Futschek (Eds.) Consructivist Foundations 10 (3) p334-335.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Being Mathematical With and In-Front-Of Learners. Mathematics Teaching. ???
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). On Being Stuck On A Mathematical Problem: what does it mean to have something come-to-mind? LUMAT: 3(1) p101-121.
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). “When is a Problem?” ‘when’ is actually the problem!. Proceedings of conference on problem Solving, Santiago Chile Dec. 2013; submitted as chapter for proceedings
  • 2015 Mason, J. (2015). Developing & Using an Applet to Enrich Students’ Concept Image of Rational Polynomials. Teaching Mathematics and its Applications. doi: 10.1093/teamat/hrv004
  • 2015 Skilling, K. & Mason, J. (2015). Spaces of Values: what is available to be adopted by students. In O. Helenius (Ed.). Proceedings of MADIF 9. p137-147.
  • Mason, J. (2015). When is a Problem? Contribution in Honour of Jeremy Kilpatrick. In E. Silver & C. Keitel-Kreidt, (Eds.) Pursuing Excellence in Mathematics Education: essays in honor of Jeremy Kilpatrick. Mathematics Education Library. London: Springer.
Research topics
  • The role and structure of attention and intention in teaching,learning and doing mathematics<