Department of Education

Viewing archives for St Anne's College

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

David Andrich is Chapple Professor, Graduate School of Education, The University of Western Australia.

He obtained a bachelor degree in Mathematics and his Masters degree in Education from The University of Western Australia and his PhD from the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Susan Colver Rosenberger prize for the best research thesis in the Division of the Social Sciences. He returned to The University of Western Australia, and in 1985 was appointed Professor of Education at Murdoch University, also in Western Australia. In 2007 he returned to The University of Western Australia as the Chapple Professor of Education. In 1977 he spent 6 months as a Research Fellow at the Danish Institute for Educational Research working with Georg Rasch and he has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Trento in Italy for two periods. He has held major research grants from the Australian Research Council continuously since 1985 and has conducted commissioned government research at both the national and state levels. In 1990, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia for his contributions to measurement in the social sciences. He is especially known for his work in modern test theory, and in particular Rasch models for measurement, ranging in topics from the philosophy of measurement, through model exposition and interpretation, to software development. He has published in Educational, Psychological, Sociological and Statistical journals. He is the author of Rasch Models for Measurement (Sage) and coauthor of the software package Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMMLab).

Research

David Andrich’s current research in applying Rasch models for measurement is has two strands.

The first involves articulating a research and assessment paradigm that is different from the traditional in which statistical models are applied. In the traditional paradigm, the case for choosing any model to summarise data is that it fits the data at hand; in contrast, in applying the paradigm of Rasch models, the case for these models is that if the data fit the model, then, within a frame of reference, they provide invariance of comparisons of persons with respect to items, and vice versa. Then any misfit between the data and the chosen Rasch model is seen as an anomaly that needs to be explained by qualitatively by reference to the theory behind the construction of the instrument, and the operational aspects of its application. He argues that this approach improves the quality of social measurement, including in education, psychology, sociology, economics and in health outcomes. The second area of research is further articulating the implications of the Rasch models and development of complementary software, to better understand a range of anomalies, for example, how to identify guessing in multiple choice items, how to identify and handle response dependence between items, and mutldimensionality. He has also recently published the paper which shows how person location estimates can be obtained independently of all test parameters using the general unidimensional Rasch model in the case where each person has sat a multiple of tests, for example for selection for university entry. Andrich, D. (2010) Sufficiency and conditional estimation of person parameters in the polytomous Rasch model. Psychometrika. (Online First Publication).

Caitlin is a DPhil student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her DPhil study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol.

Jo-Anne previously held the position of Head of Research at the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, where she managed the research programme and was responsible for the standard-setting systems for public examinations. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen, Queen’s (Belfast) and Umea.  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospect