Department of Education

Viewing archives for St Antony's College

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange stud