Department of Education

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Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested, stretched and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based in a University of Oslo study of how elementary school teachers of shy and withdrawn children work successfully with them. This research is funded by the Research Council of Norway. The research team has been awarded further Research Council funding for a study to start in 2021. The new project will examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school and will be the first to take the perspectives of shy children in school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, will draw on a study of within workplace transitions as older workers learn to work with new technologies.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (in preparation for 2021) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (in preparation for 2022) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224.
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working Relationally with Networks of Support Within Schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk.
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (in press) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal.
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (in press) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

The focus of Nuzha’s current research is on undergraduates, debt and employability—by looking at undergraduates in universities in both Scotland and England, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, she will explore the extent to which fee-paying and debt-aversion influence educational and vocational choices and attitudes; specifically, learning, employability attitudes and identity.

In particular, it seeks to highlight the ways in which these issues are affected by SES and type of university.  Her research interests are higher education, the labour market, learner identity and social exclusion.

She holds a Grand Union DTP ESRC Studentship in conjunction with The Edge Foundation.

Velda Elliott is Associate Professor of English and Literacy Education. She is a curriculum tutor for the English PGCE and MSc in Learning and Teaching.

She is also Director of Doctoral Research, in which role she leads doctoral training in the department. She is co-convenor of the Qualitative Methods Hub.

Velda was an English teacher in state schools in Yorkshire before undertaking doctoral research in OUCEA, gaining her doctorate in 2011. She has previously led the PGCE in English with Drama at the University of Warwick and been a Lecturer in English in Education at the University of York.

Velda researches in the fields of English in Education and Educational Assessment. Within the field of English, her work considers both what it means to be ‘good’ at English and what English, media and drama education are ‘good for’. Some of her work considers the ways in which English education relates to political priorities and desires. She is particularly interested in what knowledge looks like in the subject of English.

She contributes regularly to professional publications such as NATE’s Teaching English magazine. Velda also researches at the intersection of English literature and education, looking in particular at Shakespeare and ways in which his work is refigured in educational contexts. She works on the ways in which literary criticism is available to and used by teachers and students in secondary schools; she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers and regularly blogs about research articles on A level texts, making critical material available to schools who do not have access to academic journals. In assessment Velda is particularly interested in the way in which markers, especially examiners, make decisions, and the values and identities they espouse in doing so. She led the EEF review of the literature on written marking A Marked Improvement?

Velda was awarded the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017 for her contribution to the field of English in Education.

Anay is passionate about education for first generation learners in remote rural and tribal India.

He loves sports, conversation about philosophy and spirituality, and flowers.

He hopes to transform the teacher education system in India after completing his DPhil at Oxford.

Title of Thesis

The Role of teachers in differentiated education in South India

Publications

Nangalia, A. (2016). The Role of English in Wastepicker Communities in Bangalore: A Grounded Theory AND Design and Implementation of English Language Teaching Program. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Eleanor Rawling, MBE, is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Department of Education and an independent researcher and consultant, specialising in curriculum policy and curriculum change, particularly in relation to geography.

After attaining a degree in geography and a PGCE (1967-72) at the University of Oxford, she taught in a secondary school and worked on two curriculum development projects: The Schools Council Geography 16-19 Project at the University of London Institute of Education (1976-85), and The Geography, Schools and Industry Project at the University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies (1987-91). In 1991, Eleanor was made a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Department of Educational Studies and also became President of the Geographical Association (1991-2) and Chair of the Council of British Geography (1993-5). She was awarded MBE in 1995 for services to geographical education.

From 1993-2005, Eleanor was Professional Officer for Geography with the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, during which time, she also maintained her research activity and publications via links with the Oxford Department. A Leverhulme Research Fellowship 1999-2000 allowed her to take a sabbatical from QCA to carry out a study of the impact of curriculum policy on school geography, and the resulting book Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 (published by the Geographical Association) has been widely cited both in and beyond the geography education world. This was followed by a BERA publication Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geography Education. Eleanor’s contribution to policy studies was recognised by the award of the Royal Geographical Society’s prestigious Back Award for contributions to geography and education policy in 2003.

Since 2005, Eleanor has undertaken consultancy work for numerous organisations, including the Welsh Assembly Government’s Curriculum Design Team working on the Donaldson Review of the Curriculum, and the Department for Education (England), working on National Curriculum, GCSE and A level geography. She has edited the academic journal Geography, played key roles in both the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association and been an active member of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo), producing academic papers and chapters. She has given papers at a number of international conferences, including Brisbane, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Toronto, New York and most recently Boston in 2017.

Current research

Eleanor’s current research and writing focuses on curriculum policy, curriculum change and curriculum development. Significant work (2012- present) includes:

  • lead writer and consultant for the Department of Education (England) on Geography National Curriculum and GCSE criteria;
  • lead writer, consultant and member of Advanced Level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) for Geography;
  • consultant to the Welsh Assembly Government’s curriculum design and development team developing a curriculum framework for Wales and working on the Humanities AoLE;
  • research and updating of ‘ Changing the Subject; the impact of policy on school geography’
  • contribution to a seminar in Boston (2017) on learning progressions as international member of a US project Transformative Research in Geography Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Centre for Research in Geography Education (Texas State University)
  • founder member and active contributor to the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo)

Eleanor’s recent research has also extended into the area of cultural geography, in particular the dynamics of self and place, geography’s links with literature and poetry and the implications of these developments for geography education. Since 2011, she has published a book about the poet, Ivor Gurney (Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place), two chapters examining the role and challenge of place in school geography (2011 and 2018), an article in the new journal GeoHumanities (2016) and a paper in the US Journal of Geography (2018).

Publications (since 2000)
  • 2018 Reflections on Progression in Learning about Place in Journal of Geography, Vol 117 pp128-132
  • 2018 Place in Geography: Change and Challenge in Debates in Geography Education 2nd edition ed. Lambert D and Jones M, London, Routledge
  • 2016 The Geography Curriculum 5-19; What Does it All Mean? Teaching Geography Vol 41 (11) pp 6-9
  • 2016 Walking into Clarity; the dynamics of self and place in the poetry of Ivor Gurney GeoHumanities Vol 2 (2) pp 509-522
  • 2015 Curriculum Reform and Examination Change for Geography 14-19, Geography Vol 100, Pt 3 pp 164-168,
  • 2011 Ivor Gurney’s Gloucestershire; exploring poetry and place, Stroud, Glos, The History Press
  • 2011 Reading and Writing Place, a chapter in Geographical Education for the 21st Century ed G.Butt,, London, Continuum
  • 2011 Organic public geographies: ‘making the connection’. In Antipode (online journal) Vol 43, no.4. Authors: Harriet Hawkins et al incl.Eleanor Rawling
  • 2008 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Teaching Geography Vol 33 no 3, Autumn 2008
  • 2007 Planning Your Key Stage 3 Curriculum, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2007 Taking a ‘Cultural Turn’. Teaching Geography Vol 32 no.1 Spring 2007
  • 2006 Changing the Subject; what’s it got to do with me? In Handbook for Secondary Geography Teachers, Sheffield, Geographical Association.
  • 2006 A Cultural Turn for School Geography? The experience of one pilot course for 14-16 year olds in England. Proceedings of the Symposium of the International Geographical Union’s Commission on Geographical Education, Brisbane, IGU-CGE June 2006
  • 2005 School Geography and the Process of Curriculum Change, Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training website, www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk
  • 2004 Managing Curriculum Change 14-19; A Case Study from England, in Symposium Proceedings of International Geographic Union Commission on Geographical Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
  • 2004 School Geography in England – National Updates Section in Geographical Education; Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World edited by Kent A, Rawling E and Robinson A, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and Internationl Geographical Union-Commission on Geographical Education
  • 2004 Geographical Education: Expanding Horizons in a Shrinking World jointly edited with A Kent and A Robinson, and author of one chapter, Scottish Association of Geography Teachers and International geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education, Glasgow
  • 2003 Acting the Part or Watching the Action; issues arising from undertaking participant research in a policy setting in Issues for Research in Geographical Education (Research Fora 3,4,5,6) edited by Ashley Kent and Andrew Powell, University of London and IGU Publications, London
  • 2003 Connecting Policy and Practice; Research in Geographical Education, The BERA Professional User Review Series, British Educational Research Association, Nottingham
  • 2002 Meeting the Key Stage 3 Challenge Teaching Geography Vol 27 (2) April 2002(jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2002 School Geography in England 1991-2001 in Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools; An OU Reader Routledge Falmer, London
  • 2001 Changing the Subject; the impact of national policy on school geography 1980-2000 , Geographical Association, Sheffield.
  • 2001 The Politics and Practicalities of Curriculum Change 1991-2000 arising from a study of school geography in England, British Journal of Educational Studies Vol 49 (2) June 2001 137-158
  • 2001 The Rises and Falls of School Geography Teaching Geography Vol 26 (3) July 2001 108-111 (jointly authored with J Westaway)
  • 2000 ‘The International Network for Teaching and Learning: Developing Links with School Education, Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol 24 (2) 277-284, jointly authored with S. Bednarz (Texas, USA), S Burkill (Devon, UK), J. Lidstone (Queensland, Australia).
  • 2000 ‘School Geography 5-16; Issues for Debate, in Issues in Geography Teaching ed T. Binns and C. Fisher, Routledge/Falmer p6-22
  • 2000 ‘School Geography: Does it Have a Future?’ Geographical Education (journal of the Australian Geography Teachers’ Association) Vol 13.
  • 2000 ‘Understanding Teacher Supply in Geography’ A Special Report for the Teacher Training Agency and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), arising from a conference held in April 1999.
  • 2000‘National Curriculum Geography: New Opportunities for Curriculum Development’, in Reflective Practice in the Teaching of Geography ed Ashley Kent, Sage Publications, London pp 99-112
  • 2000 Ideology, Politics and Curriculum Change: Reflections on School Geography 2000 Geography Vol 85 (3) 209-220

 

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo. She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction and is a member of its editorial board. She sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the r