Department of Education

Viewing archives for St Stephen's House

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Upon finishing her undergraduate degree in English Linguistics at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and gaining the highest GPA award for three consecutive years, Hala started working as a Teaching Assistant at the same Institution.

She then received a scholarship from King Abdulaziz University to pursue her Masters education at the University of Leeds in the UK, which she was awarded with Distinction. She is currently completing a DPhil in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford, also funded by King Abdulaziz University.

Hala’s research interests lie in the area of second language reading, particularly in relation to the lower-level processes involved in reading, and predictors of reading comprehension ability.

Publications
  • Alghamdi, H. (2014, March) An imbalanced form-meaning link: the case of Saudi EFL learners. Paper presented at the 20th international TESOL Arabia conference. Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, January) Arab ESL readers’ ‘vowel blindness’: a critical review. Paper presented at the 8th SSC conference. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. (2015, September) The Psycholinguistic Grain Size Theory revisited: the role of context in Arabic reading. Paper presented at the 5th UK Orthography annual meeting. University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H. and Woore, R (2018, September) The contribution of second language decoding proficiency to second language reading comprehension. Paper presented at the British Association for Applied Linguistics 51st Annual conference. University of York St. John, York, United Kingdom.
  • Alghamdi, H., Woore, R, and Alahmadi, B (2019, August). The Relative Importance of five predictors of L2 reading comprehension: evidence from Dominance analysis and Relative Weight Analysis. Paper presented at EUROSLA 29th Annual conference. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
  • Alghamdi, H (2020, January) Can L2 decoding proficiency predict L2 reading comprehension performance? Paper accepted for presentation at ELT Saudi 2020 conference and expo. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-6