Department of Education

Viewing archives for Wolfson College

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Peter is a developmental psychologist. His research is about children’s perception and their logical reasoning.

His first degree was in Psychology at Cambridge University (1961).  He did his PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London (1963) and continued working there until 1967 when he went to Oxford University as a university lecturer in the Department of Experimental Psychology and the tutorial fellow in Psychology at St John’s College. In 1980 Peter was appointed the Watts Professor of Psychology in the same department and a Professorial Fellow in Wolfson College. He retired from his position as the Watts Professor in 2004 and is now a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education in Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College.

Peter was given the British Psychology Society’s President’s Award in 1984 and was elected to the Academia Europaea in 1990. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991.

In 1991 Peter received the APPORT International Award for “contributions to Psychology and co-operation with Portuguese Psychology”. In 1999 he was given the award for Outstanding Scientific Contribution by the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. He was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2013.

Peter was the founding editor from 1982 to 1986 of the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. He was also the editor of Cognitive Development from 2000-2005.

Research

Peter’s PhD research (1963) was on children and adults with learning difficulties. Soon after that, he spent a post-doctoral  year (1964) in the University of Geneva working with Prof. Piaget and his colleagues.

In 1967 Peter began a series of experiments on children’s perceptual and logical abilities, which led to his first book Perception and Understanding in Young Children (1974) and to a very controversial article in Nature, written with Tom Trabasso, on children’s transitive inferences in 1971.

Around that time Peter began working on children learning to read and, together with his colleague Lynette Bradley, created a novel design which they called the ‘reading age control match’ to establish for the first time that many dyslexic children are remarkably insensitive to the sounds that make up words (i.e. to phonology). With the same kind of phonological awareness tasks Lynette and Peter went on to conduct a large-scale longitudinal study, combined with an intervention study, which was also a completely new design at the time, to test the causal hypothesis that children’s phonological awareness has a pervasive and powerful effect on the progress that they make in reading and spelling. This was published in a much-cited article in Nature in 1983. Peter and Lynette also wrote two books on the subject of phonology and reading.

Soon after that, Peter began to work with Terezinha Nunes on another form of linguistic awareness, the awareness of morphemes, and its relation to reading. This research also involved combinations of longitudinal research and intervention, and it has shown that morphemic awareness is also a powerful determinant in learning to read, particularly later on in the school years.

Terezinha and Peter have also been doing research on children’s mathematics, and in particular on children’s ability to reason about quantitative relations. They persuaded the ALSPAC research team to include measures of children’s additive and multiplicative reasoning in their very large-scale study and that allowed them to plot the longitudinal relationships between these measures and the children’s success in key stage assessments at 11- and 14-years in a large number of children. The study found a vey strong predictive relation between the children’s reasoning and their subsequent success in the key stage assessments of mathematics.

This interest in children’s understanding of quantitative relations led naturally to research on what are called intensive quantities i.e. quantities like density and probability, that are based on a proportional relationship between two other quantities. Recently Terezinha and Peter were invited by the Nuffield Foundation to write a report on Children’s Understanding of Probability (now available on the Nuffield Foundation website). They followed this with an intervention study of children learning about probability in a project directed by Terezinha Nunes and her research team consisting of Peter, Deborah Evans, Laura Gottardis and Emmanouela Terlektsi.  This project was with 10-year-old children and involved two 15-session intervention studies in both of which one group learned about probability and another about mathematical problems solving. These studies established that it is possible for children of this age to learn how to solve probability problems.

Peter’s reason for coming to the Oxford Department of Education was his work with Terezinha Nunes. Peter has also been able to participate in some of the classes in the MSc in Education, Child Development and Education Pathway. His contacts with the Mathematics Education group in the department have also been very useful.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve t