Department of Education

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Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’