Department of Education

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Lecture Abstract

 

It is widely believed that digital disruption is transforming all aspects of economy and society. This disruption is seen to be driven by advances across a number of interdisciplinary fields and mutually reinforcing technologies such as, artificial intelligence, robotics, additive manufacturing, synthetic biology, and smart materials. Concerns about the impact of automation on employment, which has received a lot of media attention, has a longer history. This raises the question of what, if anything, is so significant or ‘revolutionary’ about today’s developments in digital innovation and what are their implications for the future of education, work and labour markets. There is a danger that debates about automation and the fourth industrial revolution exist in a ‘parallel universe’ to current economic realities, with a focus on the latest technological developments or robot victories over human intelligence. This talk will consider different interpretations of the fourth industrial revolution and the role of digital technologies in (re)shaping the future of education, skills and work. It will present a theory of ‘job scarcity’ rather than ‘labour scarcity’, which does not signal the end of work, but the need for a fundamental reassessment of current public policy.

 

About the speaker

 

Phillip Brown is a Distinguished Research Professor in the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University. He left school with little to show for it, before starting work as a craft apprentice at British Leyland’s car plant in Cowley, Oxford in the early 1970s. The realities of factory life at the time drove him to take-up evening classes, sparking a passion for the social sciences. He has since published many books and given presentations in over twenty countries. He has conducted extensive international research on globalisation, skills and the future of work, and is currently leading a six-country research programme examining digital transformation and the future of work, education and skills (in collaboration with the Research and Innovation Division, Institute of Adult Learning, Singapore). He recently chaired an Independent Review for the Welsh Government examining the impact of digital innovation for the economy and the future of work in Wales, UK. The final report was published September 2019. His latest book with Hugh Lauder and Sin Yi Cheung, The Death of Human Capital?: Its Failed Promise and How to Renew It in an Age of Disruption, will be published by Oxford University Press in May. 2020.

 

Sponsored by the Edge Foundation

Following the University’s 2019 Recognition of Distinction exercise, Therese Hopfenbeck and Niall Winters have been awarded the title of Professor and will deliver their inaugural lectures at Kellogg College on Wednesday 20 November.

Therese Hopfenbeck has been awarded the title of Professor of Educational Assessment and her lecture will be titled ‘Innovative Assessment and Self-Regulation for a World in Crisis’

Niall Winters has been awarded the title of Professor of Education and Technology and his lecture is entitled ‘Technology in Global Healthcare Training’

Find out more here.

School exclusions are on the rise and we are delighted to have a group of eminent speakers who will address the issues around exclusion for looked after and adopted children and consider how exclusions might be prevented.

SPEAKERS

Please note unfortunately Amanda Spielman, Ofsted Chief Inspector will NOT be speaking due to purdah rules prior to the forthcoming general election

Confirmed – Harry Daniels, Professor of Education, University of Oxford

Abstract: This brief talk will provide a background to central aspects of exclusion from school and an overview of a new four year project led by Professor Harry Daniels and Associate Professor Ian Thompson at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education. A team of researchers operating across Oxford, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Belfast, Reading and the London School of Economics (LSE) will further research into the impact of UK school exclusion after the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) awarded a grant of £2,550,850 to develop a multi-disciplinary understanding of the political economies and consequences of school exclusion across the UK. The research will lead to a greater understanding of the cost of exclusions at individual, institutional and system levels, as well as pupils’ rights, entitlements, protection and wellbeing, and the landscapes of exclusion across the UK’s four jurisdictions.

Confirmed – Alison Woodhead, Director of Public Affairs and Communications, Adoption UK

Abstract: Not all children have an equal start in life. But all children deserve an equal chance at school. For tens of thousands of adopted children in the UK, the reality of school is a daily struggle for survival. Many are failing academically as a result, and levels of exclusion are high. Through detailed surveys of families and teachers, interviews with schools and discussions with education experts, Adoption UK has identified significant gaps in understanding, empathy and resources that are preventing adopted children from having an equal chance to succeed at school.

Confirmed – Lisa Cherry, Author and Trainer

Abstract:One area that has received a lot of attention and focus in regard to looked after children has been education. Statistics have shown consistently that children living away from home under perform at every key stage within education. Looked after children are five times more likely to face a fixed term exclusion and twice as likely to experience a permanent exclusion (Department for Education, 2017). This study focuses on what impact there has been on education and employment on care experienced adults who left care in the 1970’s and 1980’s and were excluded from school.

The findings offer a narrative on education across the life course of those who have been looked after away from home and excluded from school that suggests a strong desire to engage with education into adulthood. Relationships and their impact upon the individual, negatively and positively, raise questions about impact on the participants but also the perceived understanding of impact that teachers and social workers have of their input. In conclusion, the data collected provides answers about impact and the journey that had been undertaken to recover a lost education. These findings are important as they inform further research. They offer a different narrative about what happens to people across the life course and enable some insights for educators about their opportunity for positive impact and the results that this can bring, that ultimately stay with a person throughout their life.

The evening will be chaired by the Rees Centre Director and Associate Professor, Dr Lisa Holmes.

Following the presentations, there will be a Q & A session with the audience. Please join us afterwards for a drinks reception to celebrate our inaugural annual lecture.

 

ABOUT THE REES CENTRE

The Rees Centre is located within the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Established in 2012, the Centre produces research evidence to inform policy and practice in the areas of children’s social care and education. We aim to improve the life chances and particularly the educational outcomes of those who are, or have been supported by children’s social care services, with a focus on children in need (including those in care), adoptive and special guardianship families and care experienced adults. The primary audiences for the Centre’s work are children’s social care practitioners and managers, foster carers, adopters, guardians, schools, virtual schools, health, the judiciary, therapeutic services, policymakers and other researchers. We often work in partnership with others and have well-established relationships across the sector with both statutory and third sector organisations as well as the care-experienced community.

ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

In 2019, the University of Oxford’s Department of Education celebrates the 100th year since the passing of a statute creating what was known in 1919 as the University Department for the Training of Teachers. To celebrate our centenary a year-long series of activities will be delivered to address some of the department’s top initiatives for 2019, answer some of the big questions facing education today and to reveal the advancements the department has made to the study of and research in the field of education. Join us as we mark our 100th year and discover more about our anniversary here.

In this presentation, Professor Fernando Reimers will draw on the research findings of the Global Education Innovation Initiative focusing on how teacher professional development prepares teachers to cultivate cognitive and socio-emotional skills on their students.

These findings are the subject of the recently published book Preparing Teachers to Educate Whole Students, a cross-national comparative study examining teacher professional development programs in Chile, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, Singapore and the United States.  The Global Education Innovation Initiative (GEII) is a research and practice collaborative Professor Reimers leads with the aim of strengthening public education, so schools can better prepare students with the competencies necessary to participate, civically and economically, in societies which are rapidly changing as a result of technological advancements and of globalization.

Fernando M. Reimers is the Ford Foundation Professor of the Practice of International Education and Director of the Global Education Innovation Initiative and of the International Education Policy Masters Program at Harvard University. An expert in the field of Global Education, his research and teaching focus on understanding how to educate children and youth so they can thrive in the 21st century.

ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

In 2019, the University of Oxford’s Department of Education celebrates the 100th year since the passing of a statute creating what was known in 1919 as the University Department for the Training of Teachers. To celebrate our centenary a year-long series of activities will be delivered to address some of the department’s top initiatives for 2019, answer some of the big questions facing education today and to reveal the advancements the department has made to the study of and research in the field of education. Join us as we mark our 100th year and discover more about our anniversary here.

To receive more event details from the Department of Education, join our mailing list.

Professor Nancy Perry will present on ‘Using formative assessment as a catalyst for self-regulated learning.’

Abstract

Self-regulated learning (SRL) describes proactive and productive approaches to learning that enable learners to respond flexibly and adaptively to wide ranging environmental demands to meet personal and social learning goals. Efforts to support students’ SRL pair well with 21st-century learning goals and assessment for learning (AfL) goals. In 1988, Terrance J. Crooks emphasized how classroom assessment practices guide students’ judgements about what is important to learn. Importantly, he stressed how skills and attitudes educators commonly value can be undermined when instruction and assessment practices aren’t consistent. Therefore, our efforts to support teachers to help their students develop as self-regulating learners focus on assessments for self-regulated learning (AfSRL). In this talk, I describe research that both advances knowledge and improves practice concerning SRL. Specifically, I describe collaborations with primary school teachers to design and implement curriculum-linked, formative assessments that prompt and assess children’s use of SRL processes. Particular attention is given to the nature of the teacher-researcher collaborations (i.e., using participatory research methodologies) and how they advance researchers’ and teachers’ understandings about SRL and how to support it. Examples from our project illuminate what assessments can reveal about students’ SRL and how assessments can catalyze teaching and learning toward this essential 21st-century learning goal.

OUCEA Director Therese N. Hopfenbeck will give a response before opening up for a Q&A session with the audience.

Registration: Registration is free and open to all. Please click here to book your ticket.

The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception served in the Mallett Gallery.

 

About the Department of Education

In 2019, the University of Oxford’s Department of Education celebrates the 100th year since the passing of a statute creating what was known in 1919 as the University Department for the Training of Teachers. To celebrate our centenary a year-long series of activities will be delivered to address some of the department’s top initiatives for 2019, answer some of the big questions facing education today and to reveal the advancements the department has made to the study of and research in the field of education. Join us as we mark our 100th year and discover more about our anniversary here.

To receive more event details from the Department of Education, join our mailing list.

The Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance (SKOPE) at the University of Oxford Department of Education is hosting its first Annual SKOPE Lecture, delivered by Professor Ken Mayhew on 24 January 2019 at Green Templeton College, Oxford.

The event will be chaired by Lord Baker of Dorking, who will also be providing a response to the lecture.

Tea and light refreshments will be served at 4:30pm, with the lecture starting promptly at 5pm. We would then like to invite the audience to a drinks reception at 6:00pm.

This event is being sponsored by the Edge Foundation, is free to attend and open to all.

When interested in estimating the proportion of scale variance due to a latent variable common to all of a scale’s indicators, the vast majority of applied researchers believe that Cronbach’s alpha is the index of choice.

Whereas many methodologists are aware of problems with using Cronbach’s alpha for this purpose, few seem to be aware that there is a better alternative to Cronbach’s alpha.  In this talk, I will discuss the importance of the proportion of scale variance due to a latent variable common to all of a scale’s indicators and the central problem with Cronbach’s alpha for estimating this important parameter.  In addition, an alternative to Cronbach’s alpha – coefficient omega hierarchical – will be introduced and shown to overcome the positive bias often inherent in Cronbach’s alpha.  Finally, I will present the results of simulations testing the accuracy of several different methods for estimating omega hierarchical and conclude with recommendations regarding how to estimate omega hierarchical.